Winter Camping Questions - ClubTread Community

User Tag List

 25Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of (permalink) Old 01-09-2017, 02:57 AM Thread Starter
Scaling New Heights
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 78
Default Winter Camping Questions

We are new to winter camping, although we get out quite a bit. We really enjoy the snow camping we have done, but nothing beats experience, we would like some input on making the overnights a little warmer on a budget, and any other practical helpful hints to make winter camping easier. Thanks so much in advance
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_7518.jpg
Views:	139
Size:	1.17 MB
ID:	189578  

activegirl49 is offline  
Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of (permalink) Old 01-09-2017, 03:17 AM
Hittin' the Trails
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 41
Default

Do not underestimate the value of a good sleeping pad. The warmest of sleeping bags will not be comfortable if cold is pouring in from the ground (your body compresses the sleeping bag against the pad).
There are ways to cheat if you have lousy gear, such as sleeping with extra clothes, a warm water bottle at the feet.
I find that these cheats don't compare to a quality sleeping pad and sleeping bag. I spent the big bucks for a down filled mat and won't go back to the cheap foams I suffered with in my youth. Obviously any three season tent with mesh will be cold as the wind will blast right through.
I find even in very cold conditions, the combination of down mat and -30 down sleeping bag allows me to keep the tent open to the stars on a good weather day. My Bibler hanging stove is also great at creating a luxurious winter experience (with proper ventilation to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning).

Hope this helps.
alpalmer and activegirl49 like this.
junglesavage is offline  
post #3 of (permalink) Old 01-09-2017, 04:36 AM
Hittin' the Trails
 
bruno-leveque's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Vancouver, BC
Interest: Photography, Hiking, Mountain Bike, Camping, Snowshoeing
Posts: 7
Default

I'm still quite new to Winter Camping and refining my setup too... Having a bottle of hot water in my sleeping bag definitely help but usually doesn't length the full night (4/5h).

Lately I added a survival blanket inside my tent to insulate the ground. My Sleeping bag is a 0įC and I didn't want to invest in a heavy and pricey winter sleeping bag. Having in a great sleeping pad also helped a lot!

I also recently ordered a liner which is supposed to help but I still have to try it in proper conditions.

Finally something that can play a lot is simply the spot where you choose to pitch your tent: try to find a spot where you are protected from the wind and exposed to the sun in the morning, or build a snow shield/wall around your tent.

Hope that helps! Have fun!
alpalmer and activegirl49 like this.

Outdoor Adventurer based in Vancouver, BC
http://photography.bruno-leveque.com/
bruno-leveque is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of (permalink) Old 01-09-2017, 11:50 AM
Off the Beaten Path
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: ALBANY, OR, USA.
Interest: SEA KAYAKING HIKING FISHING
Posts: 801
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bruno-leveque View Post

I also recently ordered a liner which is supposed to help but I still have to try it in proper conditions.

Hope that helps! Have fun!
I would be interested in hearing how your Thermolite Liner works out. I have tried a couple of different liners, including a marino wool liner, and have been somewhat disappointed with the weight to performance factors. Liners definitely help to keep the bag cleaner but haven't help me make one bag more versatile.
activegirl49 likes this.
alpalmer is offline  
post #5 of (permalink) Old 01-09-2017, 01:25 PM
Headed for the Mountains
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Burns Lake, BC, .
Posts: 286
Default

Of course the best gear you can afford will usually help you move in the right direction.

Overbuild your sleeping pad. I use an exped mat and I also throw my sitting pad, backpack, extra clothing, etc.. underneath the pad for an extra bit of performance.

Eat properly. Setting yourself up with a long energy burn (fat) for the evening is another way to sleep warmer.
Stay away from alcohol. It's a strike against being comfortable. (for everyone)

Mild exercise just before bed will save your body a lot of heat energy as your sleeping system taps some to bring itself up to temperature.

And now wait for it... us a pee bottle.

edit to add... have separate dry clothing just for sleeping, and if the trail permits use a pulk to bring some luxuries along.
activegirl49 likes this.

Last edited by Canoeheadted; 01-09-2017 at 03:46 PM. Reason: afterthought
Canoeheadted is offline  
post #6 of (permalink) Old 01-09-2017, 02:37 PM
Headed for the Mountains
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Calgary
Posts: 144
Default

Bruno, I don’t think your pad is thick enough for camping on snow or somewhere towards -10. Did you try this already? I see you are young and strong and for a night this can be done for sure, but R-value 3.2 is not winter - even though it's said it's suitable.


The Thermolite: I wouldn’t buy it again, so, now that it’s here, well: it adds perhaps a bit of warmth, but my experience is: if your bag isn’t suitable for the cold the liner won’t do the rest… no, you can’t just summate the degrees together and it’s for sure far away from the announced whatever adding degree… besides it develops a strange smell quite easily (even though wearing long quite fresh clothes) and it’s electrostatic.
It’s quite flexible so you don’t feel cramped in it – but the old fleece blanket gives more warmth, well, weighing a bit more (I think it's something like 600 g), it just doesn’t stay in place so I would try a cheap fleece liner with zipper for opening as a blanket if you don’t want to spend a lot of money for occasional winter fun.

And unfortunately I must say that aluminum blankets don't insulate the ground or I just can't feel a substantial difference.
activegirl49 likes this.

Last edited by Kokanee75; 01-09-2017 at 02:58 PM.
Kokanee75 is offline  
post #7 of (permalink) Old 01-09-2017, 05:04 PM
Headed for the Mountains
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: vancouver, bc, Canada.
Posts: 196
Default

Get a -20 bag. The difference between say a -12C and a -20C is that you will wake up cold in the middle of the night in the less warm bag and sleep until dawn cozily in the warmer one. Some people need even warmer than -20C. Another solution is to zip two bags together (good for couples). That way you can get away with two -12C bags. An alternative to a single -20C bag might be a -12C bag with a cover.

Also four season tents are warmer than three season ones because they do not have mesh walls.
alpalmer and activegirl49 like this.
jefffski is offline  
post #8 of (permalink) Old 01-10-2017, 05:06 AM
Hittin' the Trails
 
bruno-leveque's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Vancouver, BC
Interest: Photography, Hiking, Mountain Bike, Camping, Snowshoeing
Posts: 7
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kokanee75 View Post
Bruno, I donít think your pad is thick enough for camping on snow or somewhere towards -10. Did you try this already? I see you are young and strong and for a night this can be done for sure, but R-value 3.2 is not winter - even though it's said it's suitable.
I actually tried it one overnight on Thunderbird Ridge by -15 and it wasn't that bad. After yeah I imagine there is still better but before that I was using a basic summer sleeping pad and I clearly saw the difference. Also I'm not necessarily looking (yet) for the most comfortable experience while winter camping. I'm more trying to find a good compromise between comfort and what I can actually carry in my 50L backpack (and also without having to spend thousands of dollars in winter equipment). Also I'm doing quite a lot of photography which means that I usually carry a tripod, my DSLR and a couple of lenses... and my nights are usually quite short since I'm spending a good part of the night or the early morning playing with my camera

As for the liner, I'm not naive and read a couple of review about it, I'm not expecting to get 15 more degrees with it but I think it should be a good compromise... I should be able to test it soon.
activegirl49 likes this.

Outdoor Adventurer based in Vancouver, BC
http://photography.bruno-leveque.com/
bruno-leveque is offline  
post #9 of (permalink) Old 01-10-2017, 10:19 PM
Scaling New Heights
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Burnaby, BC, Canada.
Posts: 51
Default

I do have some good gear for winter, but my suggestion instead of investing in a lot of extra gear is to carry enough fuel to boil water to put in a Nalgene bottle inside your sleeping bag. I find it makes a huge difference and enables me to fall right asleep. I usually need a bio break in the middle of the night so I wake up and toss out the bottle when I get up. If it's below -10 I just light the stove and reheat the water (4 min) so I can fall back asleep until sunrise. My experience is that no matter how much I spend on good gear, nothing is as pleasing and comfortable as that warm bottle inside my bag.

I usually reheat everyone else's bottle at the same time if they hear me and they toss them out of their tent... lol

Also - if you don't have a good sitting pad then fold up some cardboard in your pack so you're not sitting on snow when you're outside your tent. That actually works well.
activegirl49 likes this.

Last edited by dmack; 01-10-2017 at 10:28 PM.
dmack is offline  
post #10 of (permalink) Old 01-12-2017, 02:07 AM Thread Starter
Scaling New Heights
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 78
Default

I really appreciate everyone's suggestions and advice! Thank you so much! We are going to try the thermolite pads combined with our inflatable thermarests. Also adding another sleeping bag over top and perhaps a lightweight tarp as well. We do have a great 4 season tent we are really happy with. It's the MEC northfield 2.5 .


Thanks again and we'll keep you posted on what works for us!
activegirl49 is offline  
post #11 of (permalink) Old 01-12-2017, 03:18 AM
Headed for the Mountains
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Calgary
Posts: 144
Default

Wow, you are carrying a lot. I think a wider synthetic sleeping bag over the other is a good idea.
Then I would try a reindeer/caribou fur skin perhaps in combination with some kind of foam mattress - or/and your existing ones.
activegirl49 likes this.

Last edited by Kokanee75; 01-12-2017 at 03:28 AM.
Kokanee75 is offline  
post #12 of (permalink) Old 01-13-2017, 05:00 PM
Hittin' the Trails
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: , , .
Posts: 17
Default

I am planning to use TWO lightweight down sleeping bags, each rated 0 C, one inside another, to sleep in -10 to -20 temperatures. For pads, I am planning to use one inflatable Klymit Inertia ultralight pad (no warmth added) on the ground, and top it with a light foam pad, to keep me off the cold ground. And sleep with a couple of layers on.
activegirl49 likes this.
echino is offline  
post #13 of (permalink) Old 01-13-2017, 05:29 PM
Off the Beaten Path
 
kellymcdonald78's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Interest: Hiking, Backpacking, Skiing, Space History
Posts: 723
Default

You could also build a quinziee or snowshelter. MUCH warmer sleeping in one vs. a tent (or better yet an ACC cabin)
alpalmer and activegirl49 like this.
kellymcdonald78 is offline  
post #14 of (permalink) Old 01-13-2017, 07:36 PM
Headed for the Mountains
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Calgary
Posts: 144
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by echino View Post
I am planning to use TWO lightweight down sleeping bags, each rated 0 C, one inside another, to sleep in -10 to -20 temperatures. For pads, I am planning to use one inflatable Klymit Inertia ultralight pad (no warmth added) on the ground, and top it with a light foam pad, to keep me off the cold ground. And sleep with a couple of layers on.
I'm looking forward to your trip report.
Kokanee75 is offline  
post #15 of (permalink) Old 01-21-2017, 08:51 PM
Hittin' the Trails
 
Archive's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Surrey, BC
Posts: 21
Default

I don't have a desire to ever sleep in a tent again other than backyarding with the niece and nephew. Get a hammock and never look back. Guaranteed 1st turns.
Attached Images
   
Archive is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome
 

Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.1