Sore Knee's - What Do You Do? - Page 2 - ClubTread Community

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post #16 of (permalink) Old 06-28-2016, 08:20 PM
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Originally Posted by grousegrinder View Post
I was in Kintec and they sold me a knee brace called Incredibrace that supposedly runners are swearing by. 3 hikes later, my descending is surprisingly better and the brakes not nearly so sore!
Thanks for that. Coincidental to this thread is yet another diagnosis of small meniscus tear at my doctor's office today. Damn :-( .... I shall pop in to Kintec and see if there's anything useful for such things.

In the meantime, a visit to the Physio that fixed my hip and a whole lotta VITAMIN I as in Ibuprofen, is in order.
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post #17 of (permalink) Old 06-28-2016, 11:19 PM Thread Starter
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Wow kintec looks like a great store! I have never heard of it before. I think I will check them out and see what they have to offer. Are the staff there fairly knowledgable/helpful?

Also again thanks for all the tips I think I will be putting a bit of everything into practice for my next hike in two weeks
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post #18 of (permalink) Old 06-28-2016, 11:24 PM
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Originally Posted by woodenshoes View Post
wow. All these suggestions with physio and or training. Don't ever underestimate drugs. My concoction for affected knees is a combination of ibuprofen & naproxen. Works like a dream!
Of course. It's far better to prevent pain than to cover it up. Drugging it is a great way to deal with symptoms, but if you can avoid getting them in the future, that's much better.
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post #19 of (permalink) Old 06-29-2016, 04:41 AM
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I believe that almost every staff person is trained in kinesiology. Yes, they can tell you a lot about how to cure what ails you!
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post #20 of (permalink) Old 06-29-2016, 05:02 AM
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Originally Posted by Rachelo View Post
Of course. It's far better to prevent pain than to cover it up. Drugging it is a great way to deal with symptoms, but if you can avoid getting them in the future, that's much better.

Could not agree more. When you need drug to help, there is already some sort of damage & body reacts.

As a rule in life I try to stay away from any sort of drugs. That having said, someone once gave me a tip that after very long day -- i.e 40km, 1500+ of altitude, etc. I'd be less stiff & recover faster if I take Advil while driving back. It makes sense as Advil is anti-inflammatory. I found out it works even better with bit of caffeine. Still use it very sporadically.

One more vote for hiking poles too.
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post #21 of (permalink) Old 06-29-2016, 10:35 AM
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Could not agree more. When you need drug to help, there is already some sort of damage & body reacts.

One more vote for hiking poles too.
The sooner inflammation is dealt with the better but reliance on medication indicates chronic inflammation. That's harmful. Chronic inflammation disrupts healing, from what I've been told and experienced. Aside from preventive measures such as hiking poles, knee straps, physiotherapy exercises etc. I find the post-hike joint/cartilage issues are best treated with Ibuprofen and alternating ice+heat. If a hike involving a steep descent is on the menu I usually keep an ice pack in my jeep cooler. Getting the joint to cool down right away is vital to recovery, i've found.

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post #22 of (permalink) Old 07-07-2016, 07:45 PM
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Default KT Tape and Genutrain wrap

Just a quick note about two knee support products I tried this past week, while on a steady climbing hike (which typically means a painful descent). These are KT pro support tape, which I bought on Amazon.ca. The other is a the Bauerfeind Genutrain knee support which I bought at Kintec in North Vancouver.

Both worked quite well to keep knee cap tracking in place and significantly reduce pain from yet another meniscus tear I now have in my right knee. The KT tape product is easy to apply once the technique from the video is mastered. This tape is also amazingly durable, lasting through the hike, several showers, and a few days of activity. Very nice.

The Genutrain wrap did a great job of neutralizing cartilage and knee cap pain, especially on the dreaded downhill hike.

Here's a pic, taken near the summit of Mt Elphinstone
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Last edited by xj6response; 07-07-2016 at 07:46 PM. Reason: words
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post #23 of (permalink) Old 07-07-2016, 10:59 PM
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Default Hiking Poles

I find that they do help on downhills but I hate how my hands get sticky. I have rubber grips. Some say that cork grips do not get sticky
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post #24 of (permalink) Old 07-08-2016, 01:24 AM
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I find that they do help on downhills but I hate how my hands get sticky. I have rubber grips. Some say that cork grips do not get sticky
bought new poles over the winter which have cork grips. I do not notice any stickiness at all. Just have to guard the cork from being chewed on by porcupines.
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post #25 of (permalink) Old 04-12-2017, 11:52 PM
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Default Hey Sarah

You're experiencing a normal worn and tear injury as many hikers like myself have experience over the past few years.


Especially the fact that I love several days of backpacking trip with my friends & especially the gorgeous scenery where you see just vast of mountain tops


Here's what I've used for my past knee injury <link removed> I also had a great experience with their customer service . Super nice and patience guys I tell ya!


Don't let your injury stop you for a longer lasting years that you may have
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post #26 of (permalink) Old 04-13-2017, 04:55 PM
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I have another alternative but it would require a great deal more personal investment than poles (although poles are a good thing too). After decades of active use my 55+ knees were shot and following two years of physio, gait analysis, shoes and inserts, knee bands, etc etc., surgery was proposed The recovery stats are terrible however. Besides infection risk, only 15% actually regain full pre-injury function while the rest are lucky to just mitigate further deterioration and then only for a limited number of years.

Long story short, I discovered barefoot running. Actually, gave up the barefoot part after one summer but it was critical for learning a neutral foot strike which I now apply to running, walking, and hiking. The pain and discomfort and now gone and, as a side benefit, endurance has increased significantly. I'll give a short sales pitch but there is much on the 'net and some good books. Your foot was designed to strike the ground on the padded balls, not the boney heel. Re-learning a natural gait, where you take advantage of leverage designed into our feet and legs rather than circumventing this system by crashing down on your heels, could be the means to eliminating many related injuries to bones, joints, ligaments, and muscles of the foot and leg. Do I sound like an evangelist? You betcha!

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post #27 of (permalink) Old 04-13-2017, 10:03 PM
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Because NSAIDs also increase the risk for stroke and myocardial infarction (MI)...
This is half true. Aspirin (aka acetylsalicylic acid/ASA), is an NSAID and is actually a highly successful drug in the treatment and prevention of heart attacks. It works by reducing the ability of platelets to stick together and clot. The situation with other NSAIDS is more complicated. It seems to be the case that COX-2 selective inhibitors tend to have the opposite effect (VIOXX is a famous example of this), and there is conflicting evidence regarding some of the other traditional NSAIDs like Ibuprofen. For the most part, though, the risk/benefit is a lot higher for people already at risk for heart attacks. The situation with strokes is a little complicated, since ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes have roughly opposite pathophysiologies, so what helps with one form will may do harm with the other. Generally speaking, a little bit of aspirin or ibuprofen isn't going to cause more than maybe an ulcer if you're unlucky.
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post #28 of (permalink) Old 04-14-2017, 12:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Trail Talk View Post
I have another alternative but it would require a great deal more personal investment than poles (although poles are a good thing too). After decades of active use my 55+ knees were shot and following two years of physio, gait analysis, shoes and inserts, knee bands, etc etc., surgery was proposed
Long story short, I discovered barefoot running.
Interesting you say that, a podiatrist I was seeing told me that many foot and knee problems arise because of the way modern running shoes and boots are built these days. The toe angle is always turned upward some 15 degrees or so. This causes the fat pad in the ball of the foot to get displaced and leads to neuromas and eventual compensation causing knee and hp trouble. I now do a counter-stretch to bend the toes back under the foot.

As an aside I completed, earlier this year, an intensive course of physio at UBC orthopedics unit where they insert needles into ligament nodes etc., among other things, creating sharp reactions in the muscles and ligaments (this is not acupuncture and it is not pleasant). Curiously I went there for assessment of knee pain but the orthopedic specialist said he thought this pain was having its genesis in my hip, where i was also having problems. The treatment was very successful and seems to have released many 'stuck' ligaments in the hip and completely eliminated the knee pain. I've added a daily series of gentle knee step ups using a stair, to keep building knee strength. So far so good.

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post #29 of (permalink) Old 04-14-2017, 04:22 PM
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Originally Posted by xj6response View Post
Interesting you say that, a podiatrist I was seeing told me that many foot and knee problems arise because of the way modern running shoes and boots are built these days.
Minimalist running shoes are becoming popular along with growth of natural/neutral/forefoot running. They are characterized by minimal thickness in the sole and minimal to zero lift of the heel vs toe. MEC, for example, puts sole thickness and heel lift right on the display card for running shoes. I'll accept up to 4mm of heel lift but no more. Few shoes offer this construction, and I'm not aware of any boot brands. A raised heel doesn't stop you from achieving a forefoot gait, but makes it harder.
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