Is Anyone Concerned - Page 2 - ClubTread Community

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post #16 of (permalink) Old 10-10-2015, 01:46 AM
Off the Beaten Path
 
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x2 on the signage, a small amount of money would prevent a lot of these searches. Even the main trails on Seymour have many unmarked junctions that are confusing-silly.
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post #17 of (permalink) Old 10-10-2015, 01:56 AM
High on the Mountain Top
 
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I"m not concerned about these bone heads at all.
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post #18 of (permalink) Old 10-10-2015, 02:00 AM
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http://mountainclubs.org/trail-marke...e-to-navigate/




85 cents per piece? DAMN! that seems pretty pricey to me?
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post #19 of (permalink) Old 10-10-2015, 10:20 AM
High on the Mountain Top
 
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Yes. I am quite concerned for the volunteers who use their own vacation time, risk injury, and experience physical and mental fatigue, while not getting paid for it!

As for getting lost on a marked obvious trail in mid-daylight. Oh boy. Either the people were completely incompetent, or they intentionally went really far off trail in order to have nookie in the woods.
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post #20 of (permalink) Old 10-10-2015, 12:51 PM
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The problem with putting up more trail signs is people taking them down, which I think has been an issue in the past. Regular trail users would rather keep the environment 'natural'. If there's a way around that, it's a great idea.

In recent interviews, NSR hasn't raised the time/energy spent on rescues as an issue, it's the funding. While more education re: the outdoors could eventually decrease calls, their immediate problem is funding.
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post #21 of (permalink) Old 10-10-2015, 03:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ashi View Post
The problem with putting up more trail signs is people taking them down, which I think has been an issue in the past. Regular trail users would rather keep the environment 'natural'. If there's a way around that, it's a great idea.

In recent interviews, NSR hasn't raised the time/energy spent on rescues as an issue, it's the funding. While more education re: the outdoors could eventually decrease calls, their immediate problem is funding.
spray painted symbols. cemented poles.

hiking in europe and US trails are very clearly marked with no issues.
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post #22 of (permalink) Old 10-10-2015, 03:48 PM
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Originally Posted by kore View Post
Could we prevent people from getting lost with better trail signage? I am mostly referring to those orange markers placed on the trees. Markers that many times simply vanish…… So you start looking for them (and easily go off course because there is nothing to flag you). Maybe if you are lucky you see another marker again. The ‘best’ part is that another trail intersects your trail and guess what, it is using the same orange markers.

And talking about flagging, I found myself many times following the pink coloured ribbons only to get to a junction and find there is no pink ribbon anymore, but lots of reds, greens and blues. Now which way do you go?

I have hiked in Europe where it is virtually impossible to get lost. First of all they are using paint to mark the trails (so no one can just remove the orange markers). Then the paint is placed each 50 meters max. In a whiteout I can clearly see the signage. And do I have to mention that each trail has its own distinct sign? Trail A has a blue stripe against white background, trail B has a red cross, trail C has a red dot surrounded by white, and so on. So when you hit the junction you can clearly see where you are going and what other trails are around you.

It still baffles me that we don’t have some similar practices over here.


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Originally Posted by lowclimber View Post
spray painted symbols. cemented poles.

hiking in europe and US trails are very clearly marked with no issues.
And it's an entirely different experience lacking a lot of the wilderness people come her to enjoy.
I don't *want* to be hiking on European-style trails that have placards or paint every few metres. I don't need big signs at every junction. I really don't want the only trails to be signed and maintained big trails.

I'd be all for well-signing some busy popular trails that are always full of people, and where people get lost. Having a few really obvious loops for the people who don't have the skills for anything else is great.
But the last thing I'd ever want to see is our mountains turned into a sterilized European hiking network with no wildness left in it.
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post #23 of (permalink) Old 10-10-2015, 04:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachelo View Post
And it's an entirely different experience lacking a lot of the wilderness people come her to enjoy.
I don't *want* to be hiking on European-style trails that have placards or paint every few metres. I don't need big signs at every junction. I really don't want the only trails to be signed and maintained big trails.

I'd be all for well-signing some busy popular trails that are always full of people, and where people get lost. Having a few really obvious loops for the people who don't have the skills for anything else is great.
But the last thing I'd ever want to see is our mountains turned into a sterilized European hiking network with no wildness left in it.
Yes, I have no objection and support good markings and signage for popular trails (Grouse Grind, Pump Peak, Joffre Lake). Small side trails? No, not needed, unless trail name is just scribbled on the existing flagging.
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post #24 of (permalink) Old 10-10-2015, 05:34 PM
Headed for the Mountains
 
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Originally Posted by guntis View Post
Yes, I have no objection and support good markings and signage for popular trails (Grouse Grind, Pump Peak, Joffre Lake). Small side trails? No, not needed, unless trail name is just scribbled on the existing flagging.
Completely agree with both of you. GVRD "City limit" hikes for sure!

Giant arrow markers, maps, not just GG trail but all the other 'unknown' ones. People are curious; they will try to discover on their own and put themselves at risk.

Joffre has already been transformed into a euro-hike since I was there 10+ years ago.

I love the BC wilderness as well and it should remain wild
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post #25 of (permalink) Old 10-10-2015, 06:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dlofting View Post
....about the number of rescues that NSR and other groups have had to do in the last few months ? It seems like a lot of the people being rescued are just not prepared to be in the backcountry....no flashlights or headlamps, no bivy sacks, improper footwear, no warm clothing. Is there something we, as knowledgable hikers, can be doing to help this ? Do you talk to people you see going into the North Shore mountains unprepared ?
I'm afraid the SAR makes it way too easy for many of the dumb asses stuck out there. They should at least give out some lessons. For example, approach them with the chopper, drop a couple sandwiches, a t-shirt, and 3 matches. Then come back in a week to retreive them, while they educate themselves.
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post #26 of (permalink) Old 10-16-2015, 04:03 PM
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I have to admit, I checked in on this thread to see what Arnold had said.
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post #27 of (permalink) Old 10-26-2015, 12:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ashi View Post
The problem with putting up more trail signs is people taking them down, which I think has been an issue in the past. Regular trail users would rather keep the environment 'natural'. If there's a way around that, it's a great idea.

In recent interviews, NSR hasn't raised the time/energy spent on rescues as an issue, it's the funding. While more education re: the outdoors could eventually decrease calls, their immediate problem is funding.
NSR absolutely has raised the time/energy spent on calls as an issue.


All the extra work is taking it's toll on rescuers, says Danks.

"People are getting injured, and they're very tired from being out all night and then going to work in the morning.

"We're really hoping something can change because at this rate, it's not sustainable going forward," Danks said.


http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/britis...kers-1.3245774



The North Shore Rescue team has raised concerns that their volunteers have been overwhelmed by a spike in the number of rescues this summer and fall, and are talking to the provincial government about options for bolstering support for the all-volunteer organization.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/britis...ight-1.3256748



"As you know, we are all volunteers, and we do have other lives, if you can believe it," said Haigh. "It's been crazy more recently and I really do not understand why."

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/britis...kend-1.3217415



The pace during the past two months for the North Shore Rescue (NSR) team has been relentless, and admittedly, the elite squad made up entirely of volunteers, is exhausted.

“We’ve been so incredibly busy this year our members are having a hard time responding to all these calls,” NSR team leader Mike Danks says.

“Because we’ve been so busy, we’ll be doing a couple of nights a week on calls and then going to our day jobs. It takes a toll.”


http://globalnews.ca/news/2246336/no...-to-the-limit/



After a record-setting year of missions into the backcountry, North Shore Rescue members say they are in need of a rescue themselves.

Team members have collectively spent about 4,500 hours volunteering on rescue missions so far this year, Danks said. If you add in training and maintenance hours, that number is closer 20,000.


http://www.nsnews.com/news/north-sho...imit-1.2072784
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