What are some hiking options I have for a 1.5 day hike, - ClubTread Community

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post #1 of (permalink) Old 08-23-2015, 05:42 PM Thread Starter
Scaling New Heights
 
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Default What are some hiking options I have for a 1.5 day hike,

Since I still don't have a fully developed knowledge of the available mountains we have here, I'm asking you guys. I find pre written guides aren't that useful, whereas people here are considerably more effective at suggesting good routes and hikes.

So I just have the 1 day off this week from work. I get off monday at 5. Looking to head out after that, camp and then continue on the next day. What's a fun and high elevation hike and possibly scramble that I could get into. minimum 2k elevation! Unless it has fantastic other attributes that makeup for the smaller peak.

some ideas circulating around my mind are:

- mt wedge

- mt currey

- mt webb and macdonald


*edit- is wedge possible this time of the year without crampons? And should I bring an ice axe? Since I'd rather wear hiking boots than mountaineering boots

Last edited by Num3n; 08-23-2015 at 05:50 PM.
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post #2 of (permalink) Old 08-23-2015, 08:14 PM
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I find pre written guides aren't that useful, whereas people here are considerably more effective at suggesting good routes and hikes
Just take a chance on a route from a guidebook. Not all the routes in the guidebook are 5 stars, but then who enjoys type 1 fun? You're eventually going to get sandbagged anyways, so do something that stokes you.

the scramble up wedge is a chosspile by the west ridge apparently, just a heads up.

Cassiope and Saxifrage are cool option. Google them.
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post #3 of (permalink) Old 08-24-2015, 05:42 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by trail_blazer3 View Post
Just take a chance on a route from a guidebook. Not all the routes in the guidebook are 5 stars, but then who enjoys type 1 fun? You're eventually going to get sandbagged anyways, so do something that stokes you.

the scramble up wedge is a chosspile by the west ridge apparently, just a heads up.

Cassiope and Saxifrage are cool option. Google them.

Wise words my friend. I won't know my limits until I do something beyond my skill level
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post #4 of (permalink) Old 08-24-2015, 10:30 AM
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Are you looking only at Whistler area? Almost in the Sea to Sky corridor is the HSCT, a long dayhike that can be stretched with peak-bagging on the way.
If not, consider heading to Elsay Lake on the normal trail, camp there or up at Vicar lakes, then summit Bishop before returning the Elsay Ridge route. Don't know the stats, but it's a pretty good day. Add Elsay if you want, or if that day doesn't cut it reverse the route, sleeping on Elsay Ridge then returning via Bishop and the Lower Elsay trail. Both are sub-alpine, but with enough up and down to compensate fully for the lack of true peaks.
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post #5 of (permalink) Old 08-24-2015, 12:53 PM
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There is a small library's worth of information in the Trip Reports section of this forum. Take some time and read through some of the reports.
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post #6 of (permalink) Old 08-24-2015, 01:37 PM Thread Starter
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There is a small library's worth of information in the Trip Reports section of this forum. Take some time and read through some of the reports.

I know and I've been looking through them but there's a lot to sift through. However i'm making my way slowly haha.
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post #7 of (permalink) Old 08-24-2015, 02:07 PM
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It's all about the adventure.

For example, a good adventure and workout with lots of elevation is doing what alexcanuck suggested

If that's is too easy, park at deep cove and hike up.

If that's too easy, bike in from where you live.

Just an example.
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post #8 of (permalink) Old 08-24-2015, 02:12 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by trail_blazer3 View Post
It's all about the adventure.

For example, a good adventure and workout with lots of elevation is doing what alexcanuck suggested

If that's is too easy, park at deep cove and hike up.

If that's too easy, bike in from where you live.

Just an example.
Everyone is different but yes I know what you mean. For the moment I'm focused on finding my route up the west ridge (despite the shitty nature of it) of Wedge mountain. I want to draw it on google earth but I can't really discern what the route should be. And I refuse to go in blind and try to just find my way up. That's a very bad and ill conceived idea.

And unfortunately I cannot find a single trip report that gives a good description of it. Not even on bivouac or CT.
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post #9 of (permalink) Old 08-24-2015, 02:30 PM
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google earth is great for general ideas of where things are, but total crap for detailed route finding. It's a system that builds a model taken from digital elevation models with satellite images overlain on that. The detailed micro-terrain that makes route finding challenging is lost. GE is great for overall route stats and idea of big picture items, but small critical details are smoothed out in the model, and the satellite images don't have enough detail.

John Clarke used to check aerial images, which have more detail, for critical route finding prior to his big trips. They are available for free for the public at the UBC Archives (last I checked, about early 2014).

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And I refuse to go in blind and try to just find my way up. That's a very bad and ill conceived idea
It's not a very bad and ill conceived idea as long as you have your wits about you, and are good at making decisions on the mountain. That's how first ascentionists do things. As much beta is gathered as possible, but it's rarely a complete picture. Decision making is often times as critical as other skills.

Last edited by trail_blazer3; 08-24-2015 at 02:32 PM.
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post #10 of (permalink) Old 08-24-2015, 02:37 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by trail_blazer3 View Post
google earth is great for general ideas of where things are, but total crap for detailed route finding. It's a system that builds a model taken from digital elevation models with satellite images overlain on that. The detailed micro-terrain that makes route finding challenging is lost. GE is great for overall route stats and idea of big picture items, but small critical details are smoothed out in the model, and the satellite images don't have enough detail.

John Clarke used to check aerial images, which have more detail, for critical route finding prior to his big trips. They are available for free for the public at the UBC Archives (last I checked, about early 2014).



It's not a very bad and ill conceived idea as long as you have your wits about you, and are good at making decisions on the mountain. That's how first ascentionists do things. As much beta is gathered as possible, but it's rarely a complete picture. Decision making is often times as critical as other skills.

So essentially you are unaware of any route info and unable to find any that I could use for the west ridge?
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post #11 of (permalink) Old 08-24-2015, 02:41 PM
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So essentially you are unaware of any route info and unable to find any that I could use for the west ridge?
Google.

https://forums.clubtread.com/27-briti...tain-solo.html

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On to the Ridge proper. Horrible. Uneven boulder field on steep terrain for over 2000ft. Everything you touched moved, shifted, and had a potential to break you leg/ankle/knee... It was just horrible. No other way to put it. It was really dry up there. No snow at all.
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post #12 of (permalink) Old 08-24-2015, 02:42 PM Thread Starter
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already read that. It's not clear. It's more just his experience with the route
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post #13 of (permalink) Old 08-24-2015, 02:49 PM
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already read that. It's not clear. It's more just his experience with the route
If you're looking for step-by-step beta for a scrambling route, I'm not sure you're going to find any for this part of the world. Go out, have an adventure, and if it gets too intense/scary, you turn around. Even the best mountaineers have had to make that decision.

Furthermore, if you're willfully ignoring someone else's experience on the route, that can also be considered a very bad and ill conceived idea.... Just saying

Last edited by trail_blazer3; 08-24-2015 at 02:55 PM.
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post #14 of (permalink) Old 08-24-2015, 04:08 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by trail_blazer3 View Post
If you're looking for step-by-step beta for a scrambling route, I'm not sure you're going to find any for this part of the world. Go out, have an adventure, and if it gets too intense/scary, you turn around. Even the best mountaineers have had to make that decision.

Furthermore, if you're willfully ignoring someone else's experience on the route, that can also be considered a very bad and ill conceived idea.... Just saying

I'm calling you out right now. You are being an absolutely pretentious asshole to me for some unknown reason and not only is it annoying but it shows your character. I have been nothing but respectful in every single post I have made here, and yet you seem to be incapable of behaving at any level higher than snobby conceited arrogance.

In the future, either a) change how you speak to people which may be beyond you, or b) please refrain from responding to my posts as clearly you find me aggravating, and I feel the same towards yourself.
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post #15 of (permalink) Old 08-24-2015, 04:21 PM
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my apologies if you've taken it that way
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