Open letter to NSMBA re: trail bridge at BMN/4 - Page 2 - ClubTread Community

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post #16 of (permalink) Old 04-29-2014, 02:21 PM Thread Starter
RGB
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thedude: As I wrote in my OP:
Quote:
quote:The odds of a biker and hiker meeting at the same time on the bridge are small, but even one serious collision would be too much. Yes, most bikers coming down the trail would do a quick visual check of the bridge before starting on it, and would wait for any hiker on it, but some might not.
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post #17 of (permalink) Old 04-29-2014, 02:39 PM
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by RGB

shinsplints: 90% of all trails on the north shore were originally hiking trails or skid roads left over from old logging roads.

You mentioned Boogieman, which was built by mountain bikers, it was this class of trail that I was referring too.

I wasn't talking about the old skid roads like TNT which are not mountain bike primary. If you were to look at the trails from Seymour to Cypress Sea Level to the top of the 'alpine' then ya, most of those are hiking trails or old skid roads. The trails in the lower mountains that have been built in the last 20-25 years, were built by mountain bikers. This includes Boogieman.
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post #18 of (permalink) Old 04-29-2014, 10:35 PM
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by RGB
I was responding to Arnold, whose comments I see now are those of a troll, they are so far off the mark.
Oh, so my comments didn't agree with your views or didn't come along as nice to your ears as you would have liked, for that I'm now a troll. How logical.

It doesn't even matter who built these trails first. Fact is they are advanced mountain biking trails today, where it is very advisable to not mix uphill hikers with downhill bikers. Even if there is a possibility for both parties to pass each other safely, the biker will always need to slow down to make sure shit doesn't happen by accident, which in turn takes away a lot from the experience going down, and effort biker spent getting up the trail. For the hiker, of course, it makes no difference to stop for a few moments and then continue on his way. Building bridges to make it more accessible to hikers, will simply promote hiking on these trails. What for? Find yourself a hiking only trail and all problems are solved. I'm sure you won't have trouble finding those.
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post #19 of (permalink) Old 04-30-2014, 12:33 AM
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Squamish is riddled with these narrow bridges. I run them but also bike them, before getting target fixation on a stump and falling off the side.

Trailrunners and bikers use them all the time. If bikers are killing trailrunners they are doing a good job of burying the bodies before anyone finds out. Actually, maybe that's why I see new rollers popping up on pumptracks from time to time... hmm.

While we have the NSMBAs ear, I find berms really inconsiderate for hikers. I have to run at a pretty fast pace to generate the required centripetal force to make those corners, it can get tiring when the berms are stacked one after the other.

I suggest one of two options:
- LeeL builds concrete overpasses at all berms
- LeeL demolishes all berms and replaces them with a water feature of some kind.

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post #20 of (permalink) Old 04-30-2014, 01:41 AM
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I checked NSMBA forum and noticed you didn't post your open letter there or I couldn't find it at least. That might be a bit more appropriate.

I don't believe I've seen this bridge but from your pictures it looks like a hiker could hop off the bridge in quite a few locations briefly to let a biker pass.



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post #21 of (permalink) Old 04-30-2014, 09:19 AM
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What is the problem here....

I am on the North Shore trails 3-4 times a week hiking with two dogs and have yet to have a problem with any of the bikers. As a group they are completely respectful and generally stop just to say hello and usually inquire where we are off to. When I am on "mountain bike" trails I make it a point to stay out of the bikers way. In case of the bridge in question I am sure I would just hop off. My dogs don't use the trails in any case.

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post #22 of (permalink) Old 04-30-2014, 09:20 AM
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by leimrod

Squamish is riddled with these narrow bridges. I run them but also bike them, before getting target fixation on a stump and falling off the side.

Trailrunners and bikers use them all the time. If bikers are killing trailrunners they are doing a good job of burying the bodies before anyone finds out. Actually, maybe that's why I see new rollers popping up on pumptracks from time to time... hmm.

While we have the NSMBAs ear, I find berms really inconsiderate for hikers. I have to run at a pretty fast pace to generate the required centripetal force to make those corners, it can get tiring when the berms are stacked one after the other.

I suggest one of two options:
- LeeL builds concrete overpasses at all berms
- LeeL demolishes all berms and replaces them with a water feature of some kind.

ha - people love leaving green bags of poop surprise (probably from their dogs - I never check what's inside) near berms
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post #23 of (permalink) Old 04-30-2014, 10:50 AM
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by CL

What is the problem here....
In case of the bridge in question I am sure I would just hop off.
If you hop off the main bridge section, you hop a few feet down and into a bog.

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post #24 of (permalink) Old 04-30-2014, 11:31 AM
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I hike and bike trails around my home all the time, including some steep downhill bike trails that have been built over old hiking trails.

I have never had an encounter where there's been a collision... on these kinds of trails; I actually find the more dangerous trails are the easy consumer trails in Lost Lake Park that are surfaced with crush and bikers and runners and hikers wander obliviously along...

I have had a collision with a bear who had the temerity to be using my running trail and came around a low-viz corner about the same speed as I did. We both survived the incident...

It makes sense to me that any users of trails on public land understand the habits and behaviours of other users and use that as a responsible considered approach. Perhaps everyone can enjoy the fresh air then...
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post #25 of (permalink) Old 04-30-2014, 12:55 PM
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Apparently bridges lead to trolls.
Good lesson for the goats.
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post #26 of (permalink) Old 04-30-2014, 01:29 PM
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by msulkers

I hike and bike trails around my home all the time, including some steep downhill bike trails that have been built over old hiking trails.

I have never had an encounter where there's been a collision... on these kinds of trails; I actually find the more dangerous trails are the easy consumer trails in Lost Lake Park that are surfaced with crush and bikers and runners and hikers wander obliviously along...

I have had a collision with a bear who had the temerity to be using my running trail and came around a low-viz corner about the same speed as I did. We both survived the incident...

It makes sense to me that any users of trails on public land understand the habits and behaviours of other users and use that as a responsible considered approach. Perhaps everyone can enjoy the fresh air then...
hear hear, I don't remember the last time I had a 'user conflict' on a singletrack trail in this province. everyone seems to get along pretty well and respect each other for the most part.
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post #27 of (permalink) Old 04-30-2014, 02:05 PM
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Quote:
quote:Apparently bridges lead to trolls.
Good lesson for the goats.
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post #28 of (permalink) Old 05-01-2014, 09:11 PM
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Quote:
quote:I am on the North Shore trails 3-4 times a week hiking with two dogs and have yet to have a problem with any of the bikers. As a group they are completely respectful and generally stop just to say hello and usually inquire where we are off to. When I am on "mountain bike" trails I make it a point to stay out of the bikers way.
Same for me. I stay off the trails that are "mountain bike only" and have never had a problem on the others. I do move off the trail for bikers as it's easier for me to do that (as opposed to the biker)
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post #29 of (permalink) Old 05-01-2014, 10:38 PM
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A big objection to the motorbikes that occasionally illegally use those trails. (Ask me about the time I grabbed some *******'s spark plug wire and ran.)

Other than that, little conflict experienced or perceived.
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post #30 of (permalink) Old 05-02-2014, 09:45 AM
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I've never hiked the trail in question but from the posted pictures the "bridge" looks more like what I would call a mountain bike ramp. These are often built so bikers can cross gullys/depressions or just experience a bit of a challenge. My point is that I see these structures as designed for mountain bikes, not hikers. Hikers can use them but do so at their own risk, in my opinion.
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