What's the deal with Coast Range bugs? - ClubTread Community

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post #1 of (permalink) Old 08-18-2010, 05:47 PM Thread Starter
Hittin' the Trails
 
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Default What's the deal with Coast Range bugs?

I live in Whistler and some of the bugs are starting to get annoying. I've been stung by a wasp in the last week.
Some friends came back a day early from Birkenhead lake because the bugs were so bad.
Reports from Anderson Lake is that they are swarming.
Now I'm out and about in the wilderness most of the year and was wondering if there are any rules of thumb to predict bugs. Weather, location, time of year, etc.
I hear stories in Pemberton where people don't even make it past the 3rd hole on the golf course before running from the mosquitoes.
I'm originally from Ontario and Algonquin park is known that you just don't go there in June cause it's so harsh. Worst I've seen here was up on Metal Dome a few years ago, bad enough to make you go psycho. I've never seen that since and would avoid planning a camping trip if I know the bugs are bad enough.

So, in general, what are some of the rules regarding bugs on the west coast?

Location: is it worse as you go further north i.e. North of Pemby? Is it because snow pack melts earlier?

Temperatures/weather/elevation: do they die down after a cold snap? Dry spells versus rainy spells? Valley versus sub-alpine, alpine. Year to year variations?

time of year: seems August is when things start getting bad. I haven't noticed any bugs really so far this year.

Bug types: black flies, horse flies, deer flies, mosquitoes, etc.
I've noticed in Vancouver the other day this small house fly looking insect but with a stinger probe thingy and when it starts drilling, ouch! Some kind of west coast deer fly?
It's too fast to swat.

Any words of wisdom would be appreciated.
I try to practice good bug etiquette, light colors, 30% deet, long sleeves (when it's not too hot), unscented soaps, etc. I have a bug net but never really needed it.







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post #2 of (permalink) Old 08-18-2010, 05:55 PM
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I was up in Singing pass Monday night and I have the most bites I have had in years. They were terrible yesterday am and I am covered in little welts. It was too warm to wear long sleeves etc but fall is around the corner...
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post #3 of (permalink) Old 08-18-2010, 06:09 PM
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I think it's just the late summer. Snow is still melting up high and therefore bugs are still hatching. That said. You think the heat wave would take care of some so maybe they are becoming more resilient or having longer lifespans.

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post #4 of (permalink) Old 08-18-2010, 06:31 PM
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It's called "Global Warming" and all of us humans are to blame for it...
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post #5 of (permalink) Old 08-18-2010, 06:43 PM
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If its to warm and the bugs are out in force put another layer on and sweat! the sweat will cool you down. Add your bug jacket over top of your long sleeve moisture wicking shirt always wear pants even when its 35 degrees and spray your bug net and pants with bug spray to keep it from soking into your cloths. Always wear a round brimmed hat. I have seen thousands of Misquotes swarming and as long as you have your gear on your all good.
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post #6 of (permalink) Old 08-18-2010, 07:00 PM
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It is mainly seasonal with bugs, and that depends on available breeding ground, i.e. such as stagnant pools and puddles remaining after rain and/or snow melt. During July encountered harsh swarms of mosquitoes on the Coquihalla Lake Ridge bushwhack, and found a number of pools and small ponds right on top of the ridge. On Yak a week later, there was almost no bugs since it was steep, rocky, and well drained sand without any pools, just running water.

Last Saturday, got the worst bitten day of my life with mosquitoes.... Ross Lake area, especially 5 km south and up the lower stretches of the Skyline II are swarmed with clouds of angry mean mosquitoes.

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post #7 of (permalink) Old 08-18-2010, 07:04 PM
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Bug are very good where I live in the Peace region of Alberta. I bought a mosquito trap and haven't had to use it much as the mosies are not showing up in the usual numbers. It has been very dry for quite some time now and is likely the reason why. We had a very dry winter, relatively dry spring and very dry summer. The last 2 or so years have been much dryer here than normal. Strange because areas to the south and north have received plenty more moisture.
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post #8 of (permalink) Old 08-18-2010, 07:11 PM
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IMO, the heavy snowpack from the winter means that it's still melting. All that moisture provides a healthy environment for the buggers to breed. As the nights get colder in the alpine (September), the bugs will ease off and mosquitos will start hibernating until next summer.
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post #9 of (permalink) Old 08-18-2010, 07:35 PM
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by guntis

IMO, the heavy snowpack from the winter means that it's still melting. All that moisture provides a healthy environment for the buggers to breed. As the nights get colder in the alpine (September), the bugs will ease off and mosquitos will start hibernating until next summer.
+1 bugs are about 2 months late this year actually, so they are jamming as much annoyance as possible into the three weeks they have left to live!
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post #10 of (permalink) Old 08-18-2010, 08:19 PM
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I wear long sleeves (and pants) even when it's hot. Works well as sun protection too. Combine with a bug net or some bug spray for your head/hands and you are set for most any conditions.
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post #11 of (permalink) Old 08-18-2010, 11:05 PM
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The flies have been pretty bad lately, but the mossies are mellow this year.
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post #12 of (permalink) Old 08-19-2010, 12:26 AM
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They friken love ME,that's what's with them!!!
I agree with the large snowpack theory,it's still spring up there this year.But it also means the flowers are spectacular!!! It's like they all know," we've only got a few weeks this year,go nut's!!!" [)]
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post #13 of (permalink) Old 08-21-2010, 03:09 PM Thread Starter
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"Mosquitoes, like all insects, are cold-blooded creatures. As a result, they are incapable of regulating body heat, and their temperature is essentially the same as their surroundings. Mosquitoes function best at 80o F, become lethargic at 60o F, and cannot function below 50o F. In tropical areas, mosquitoes are active year round. In temperate climates, mosquitoes become inactive with the onset of cool weather and enter hibernation to live through the winter."

http://www.mosquitocontroltrap.com/mosquito_faq
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post #14 of (permalink) Old 08-21-2010, 08:46 PM
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by OK Jack

It's called "Global Warming" and all of us humans are to blame for it...
oh please. it's just the usual behaviour before a La Nina winter.
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post #15 of (permalink) Old 08-21-2010, 11:22 PM
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Global Swarming perhaps?
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