Olympic National Park - Ozette Loop - Day3 - ClubTread Community

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post #1 of (permalink) Old 05-29-2003, 12:50 PM Thread Starter
 
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Default Olympic National Park - Ozette Loop - Day3

Day 3
Mark is trying to get me out of the tent. I grumble and try to snuggle further down into my sleeping bag. I am not ready to face the world yet this morning. But soon it becomes apparent that the world is not going to let me hide away. I drag myself out of the tent, eat my oatmeal, and sip hot chocolate. I have to put sunglasses on, my eyes are being light sensitive. Great, I don't need a headache to hike out with! The pain never comes to the foreground though. Maybe it's my surroundings. The sparkling water and fresh ocean breeze might be convinsing my body to play nice. I can only hope it has a lasting effect. A dow and fawn walk down the beach past our camp. It takes to long to get the camera and once I have it, my eyes refuse to wake up enough to focus, making the all manual camera impossible to use. Darn!
We are a bit slow to get camp taken down and packed up. I get my tasks done and while Mark does his I go out on the beach for some personal yoga. This includes skipping stones, stretching, a few traditional poses, and just plopping my tush on the sand and closing my eyes...letting my ears tell me of my surroundings. This seems to do the trick and I finally find myself ready to face the day of heading home. A tough time for me on most trips.
We are packed and heading up the hill away from the beach. I have to stop one last time and stare out at the brilliant blue water edged with white surf. I try to imprint this scene, and the sounds and smells that go with it, into my mind, to save for later when I am needing this tranquility and can't reach it in person. I take one last deep breath and head into the forest.
Mark and I are counting the stairs on our way out...curious if what we had been told was accurate. By the time we are back at the split of the loop we are shaking our heads and apologizing to our knees. One hundred steps was a cruel joke...we counted 795 in a three mile trail section!
When we get close to the parking lot we are aproached by a group of backpackers. They are seeking a little trail magic. They have just completed the beach section from Rialto to Sandpoint and are hoping tofind a lift back to there one and only car at the far trailhead. We are heading the opposie direction once we hit hwy 101. We offer to take someone that far if they don't find a better offer. But as Mark and I are walking towards our car, my mind turns to my hopes to do sections of the PCT this summer and how I may very well be hoping for some trail magic myself. Give a little ....get a little. I drop my pack at the car and walk back to tell the hikers that we will take someome to Rilato, it's really not that far out of the way. They are overwhelmed with delight, for a moment I think I may get hugged by all of them at once. I feel wonderful we are doing this for them.
Mark and I munch a little while we chat with these folks. It turns out to be a small world. They all at one point lived in Eugene Oregon at the same time I did. One woman is interested in my ideas about the pct. As we talk I feel we are kindred spirits.
One of the men goes with us and we talk the whole way, swapping stories. He tells about the women that I had felt had as adventurous a soul as I. I shake my head in wonder as it becomes more and more apparent that she really is a kindred spirit. This women lived in a snow cave in Colorado for a whole winter, she has biked to South America, she has done her best to make the most of life. Just as I get excited at the prospect of getting to know her further, I find out she is moving to New York in a few weeks. And yet we lived within a few blocks of each other for years and didn't know each other. I have to trust that if our paths are suppose to cross again, they will. For now, I will have to continue to wonder at my ill luck in finding other women who share my feelings about the oudoors. Mark sees my disapointmentand gives me an encouraging smile. He knows I don't mind that most of our friends are men and that in the most part I get along with guys better, but he also knows I hope to someday find some women friends who will share my adventures. K-sera-sera.
I notice a large owl perched on a branch right next to the road as we zip by. And the camera is buried in the back of the car! Darn! (Again!)
As we are heading across the water towards seattle we are escorted by two fully armed coast guard boats. A little nerve racking, especially since there are people at the gun stations.
Back home I revel in a long shower and then immediately grab up the hiking guides and maps, plop on the couch, and start dreaming of adventures to come.



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post #2 of (permalink) Old 05-29-2003, 01:03 PM
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Great story! I'm totally inspired! Last night at dinner I was taking photos of HB's map and book description of the hike. I think I might hike in and camp in the same spot for two nights. Then dayhike out in each direction. Need to check with Nat to see when she'd be game.

Here's a couple closeups of that area:



BTW, I didn't realize that stone skipping was part of the sun salutation. <img src=icon_smile_wink.gif border=0 align=middle>





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post #3 of (permalink) Old 05-29-2003, 01:08 PM Thread Starter
 
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i am glad i could inspire!

My choice for a base camp would be sand point. I just love the beach south of there to yellow banks. It also seemed a bit less crowded and camps were a bit more spread out and private.

maybe i should start a new fad of yoga...specifically designed for the beach enviroment? LOL!

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post #4 of (permalink) Old 05-29-2003, 01:26 PM
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Hmmm interesting... Now I have a debate. HB was telling me the sand north of the Indian reservation land is really nice too. So which offers the best campground? We'll likely only be spending two nights.





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post #5 of (permalink) Old 05-29-2003, 07:40 PM
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Otter, I truly enjoyed reading your trip reports.

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post #6 of (permalink) Old 05-29-2003, 11:00 PM Thread Starter
 
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Nancy - Thankyou very much. I guess I treat them as a bit more than trip reports, which can make them more lengthy and a bit more personal than some may care for, but I am trying to capture my experiences and feelings in these stories, for myself and my family. I am just pleased that i can also share them with fellow outdoor enthusiasts and have them be appreciated. Thankyou again for the compliment.

Jhamlin- Some reasons I prefer Sand Point Camp: The campsites them selves are more seperated from the beach, making them more private. I did not feel the crowds as much at sand point because people were more spread out. Sand Point has a sandy cove like beach to the north and to the south a ways there are the rocky beaches full of colorful pebbles that I spoke of in my story. The surf was also closer to shore here for more time and so it's pounding and constant rush of soothing noise was more easily heard.

Cape Alava has it's own charms. It is far more open and sandy. The campsites are more open to the beach, taking away privacy but adding light. The area is far more meadowy and has springs all around it seeping out of the ground. I noticed more abundance of wildlife here, but that also could have had something to do with the fact that it was sunny when we were at Capa Alava verses raining the day at Sand Point. The islands offshore protected the beach more, resulting in less driftwood and very little pounding surf but also for calmer waters with the tidepools extending a bit further.

You can have fires at Alava but not at Sandpoint. However you can only burn driftwood and it is very sparse.



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post #7 of (permalink) Old 05-30-2003, 08:20 AM
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Hmmm interesting! I'm trying to recall the photos that HB shared with me now... I just mentioned it to Natalie and she sounds interested. Now I just need to work out the details. <img src=icon_smile_big.gif border=0 align=middle>





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post #8 of (permalink) Old 12-24-2003, 02:27 PM
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Tash - here's a few more as requested...



I'd also recommend picking up the map. I think you'll find its worth its weight in gold. I think mine was &lt; $10. (Trails Illustrated map)



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