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post #1 of (permalink) Old 02-22-2014, 02:33 PM Thread Starter
Hittin' the Trails
 
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Default GPS Purchase

Not to jump off of the post by Tess, but I am trying (as well) to narrow down what to buy for a GPS. I have been holding off for awhile due to cost and not doing to much "exploration" in the past. However, I am now at the place of wanting to buy. I do a lot of hiking, fishing, hunting, and FSR exploration. I am wanting something that could accommodate these type of activities. I have done a ton of research, yet there is a lot on the market and I am unsure where to settle. A couple of things I am looking for...

1) Good price/value
2) Large space for uploading detailed maps
3) Fast
4) Accurate
5) Plenty of waypoints and routes
6) Good battery life

Anyways, if anyone has any thoughts, please let me know. I noticed in the post by Tess that many people have suggested the 60CSx. Found a used one for $200.00 (new like condition).

Thoughts?

Thanks,

BCB
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post #2 of (permalink) Old 02-22-2014, 03:00 PM
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Still the 60CSX for me - workhorse, fast, accurate, etc.

-Ryan
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post #3 of (permalink) Old 02-22-2014, 03:10 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by Ryan.in.yaletown

Still the 60CSX for me - workhorse, fast, accurate, etc.

-Ryan
Thanks, Ryan. Really considering it.
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post #4 of (permalink) Old 02-22-2014, 03:34 PM
Hittin' the Trails
 
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I do not know if the syncing speed with the satellite differes between different models but some take some time to update your current location if you are in a heavily forested area/under a canopy. I tried it with a friend's garmin 62s unit near capilano university. It took awhile to update before it showed that it was in North Vancouver. It took around 10-15 minutes but I was moving as I didn't bother to stay in one place and wait for the unit to update.
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post #5 of (permalink) Old 02-22-2014, 03:48 PM
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Maybe consider the Garmin ETrex 30. It's $290.00 at MEC. It just works, and very well at that. I don't use mine as much anymore as my smartphone is just so useful nowadays. I never had anything but excellent performance from the Etrex. Has about 1.7 Gb memory and micro SD slot (ya gotta buy the card). Excellent built in self-leveling compass

Map sets can be pricey for the Etrex
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post #6 of (permalink) Old 02-22-2014, 04:10 PM
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by Ryan.in.yaletown

Still the 60CSX for me - workhorse, fast, accurate, etc.

-Ryan
its what we have too, I don't use it a lot, but its reliable, no hassle and fast enough.
It got us back on route 2 years ago, on extremely lousy steep terrain and dense forest canopy, when we had lost our way. and have had consistent readings when used otherwise.
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post #7 of (permalink) Old 02-22-2014, 05:07 PM
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I've had the 60 cs. I replaced it with an Oregon 300. I like the Oregon 300 better.
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post #8 of (permalink) Old 02-22-2014, 05:10 PM
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I've been really happy with my Garmin Montana 650. It is on the pricier side but it will do everything you are looking for. I like the 650 since it doubles as an decent camera. You'll get about 2 days off a charge, but it takes both it's internal rechargable batteries, plus normal batteries so you can switch out on longer trips. For maps I use the back road series, again a little pricy, but they include just about everything.

Cheers

Kelly
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post #9 of (permalink) Old 02-22-2014, 05:46 PM
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We have at least 8 different models of Garmin GPSs at home includes the current models. still LOVE 60CSX the most!

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post #10 of (permalink) Old 02-22-2014, 07:48 PM
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I guess I can't really imagine why anyone would really want a GPS that has a map on a screen. The cheapest eTrex 10 has all the functionality I would think anyone could reasonably use. You can input way-points to follow a specific route. You can get an azmuth to a specific way-point. It will show you the route you followed. You can mark a way-point and find your exact location on a topo map. If you kill an elk or deer you can mark the way-point and easily get back to it. It just doesn't have a map functionality and I never go without a topo map anyway and you shouldn't either. The only thing I wish it did better was update it's location in a canopy easier as someone mentioned earlier.
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post #11 of (permalink) Old 02-23-2014, 09:41 AM Thread Starter
Hittin' the Trails
 
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Thank you everyone for your tips and advice!
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post #12 of (permalink) Old 02-23-2014, 10:42 AM
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Garmin Montana all the way. Great UI, easy to use, big touchscreen, accurate, fast, etc, etc. It also doubles as an excellent car GPS. Because the screen is so big, it's easy to navigate while driving. It even has voice directions with the Garmin windshield suction cup (although I have it usually turned off). Battery life depends on how much screen you use and how bright it is. 2 full days is possible if you don't use the screen much (battery saving mode turned off). It has lots of internal storage that you don't even need an external SD card. I have a 2gb card in it, and never had to use it. And I have lots of map data loaded too. Maps are also easy to load and it won't overwrite your existing maps if you load a new one, unlike the 60csx. You just need to rename your existing map file on the GPS prior to loading new maps.

There are a few bad things about it, which I can live with:

- The screen will turn on if you leave the GPS in your pocket, and that will drain the battery. To combat this I set the brightness to lowest and lock the screen (so that it doesn't jump from one UI screen to another, and won't change my settings).

- When you upload tracks to it, they're not shown on the map by default, and the only way I found to show them, is to individually set them to visible. A bit annoying.

- Crashes at times.

- Touchscreen is vulnerable. Make sure you don't drop it or drop something on the screen. Replacement is $200.

The first 3 points can be easily fixed with a firmware update, so hopefully Garmin smartens up and rolls the update out to fix these issues.

If you get the version with the camera, it is complete garbage. It is about 100 times worse than a phone camera. So don't think about ditching your real camera (or even phone camera) for the GPS camera. The nice thing about having GPS camera though (and where you might actually use it) is visually memorizing your route. When you take a photo, it puts that photo on your traveled track on the map. Later on you can come back to it to review it.

I had the 60csx, and would never use it again. Old, small screen, entering text into it is a nightmare (you have to scroll through the keyboard), and super-super-super sloooooooooooow. Also, I find it can be uncomfortable to carry in your pants pocket - too much stuff to poke you with. The only thing that goes for it, it's lighter, smaller, and the screen is stronger since it's not a touchscreen. Overall, comparing a Montana to the 60csx is like comparing a brand new car to a car from the 90's.
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post #13 of (permalink) Old 02-23-2014, 10:50 AM
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by Pete

I guess I can't really imagine why anyone would really want a GPS that has a map on a screen. The cheapest eTrex 10 has all the functionality I would think anyone could reasonably use.
I can't really imagine why anyone would really NOT want a GPS that has a map on a screen. It's like saying why anyone would want a colour TV, or a smart phone. Without a map you're only left to your waypoints and tracks. You don't even know if where your GPS location is positioned is even correct.
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post #14 of (permalink) Old 02-23-2014, 11:02 AM
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by Arnold

Garmin Montana all the way. Great UI, easy to use, big touchscreen, accurate, fast, etc, etc. It also doubles as an excellent car GPS. Because the screen is so big, it's easy to navigate while driving. It even has voice directions with the Garmin windshield suction cup (although I have it usually turned off). Battery life depends on how much screen you use and how bright it is. 2 full days is possible if you don't use the screen much (battery saving mode turned off). It has lots of internal storage that you don't even need an external SD card. I have a 2gb card in it, and never had to use it. And I have lots of map data loaded too. Maps are also easy to load and it won't overwrite your existing maps if you load a new one, unlike the 60csx. You just need to rename your existing map file on the GPS prior to loading new maps.

There are a few bad things about it, which I can live with:

- The screen will turn on if you leave the GPS in your pocket, and that will drain the battery. To combat this I set the brightness to lowest and lock the screen (so that it doesn't jump from one UI screen to another, and won't change my settings).

- When you upload tracks to it, they're not shown on the map by default, and the only way I found to show them, is to individually set them to visible. A bit annoying.

- Crashes at times.

- Touchscreen is vulnerable. Make sure you don't drop it or drop something on the screen. Replacement is $200.

The first 3 points can be easily fixed with a firmware update, so hopefully Garmin smartens up and rolls the update out to fix these issues.

If you get the version with the camera, it is complete garbage. It is about 100 times worse than a phone camera. So don't think about ditching your real camera (or even phone camera) for the GPS camera. The nice thing about having GPS camera though (and where you might actually use it) is visually memorizing your route. When you take a photo, it puts that photo on your traveled track on the map. Later on you can come back to it to review it.

I had the 60csx, and would never use it again. Old, small screen, entering text into it is a nightmare (you have to scroll through the keyboard), and super-super-super sloooooooooooow. Also, I find it can be uncomfortable to carry in your pants pocket - too much stuff to poke you with. The only thing that goes for it, it's lighter, smaller, and the screen is stronger since it's not a touchscreen. Overall, comparing a Montana to the 60csx is like comparing a brand new car to a car from the 90's.
really?
Im scratching my head here
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post #15 of (permalink) Old 02-23-2014, 06:23 PM
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quote: "The screen will turn on if you leave the GPS in your pocket, and that will drain the battery."

Funny that's what my Samsung Note II does. Difficult to turn down your body core temperature to resolve the problem least you risk hypothermia but I now turn the screen away from my body if it is in a pocket.

On that note I found that both my earlier HTC desire and current Samsung Note II phones have reliable GPS core modules providing reasonably accurate data so I also have been using my Garmin eTrex 30 less often. Likewise I find the eTrex 30 to be a good reliable unit as I tend not to keep my nose glued to a screen but it gives me the functionality when I need it.

If you contact your smart phone provider, they will give you more performance specs on your smart phone GPS core module and firmware. For my eyesight I found my notebook II with mapping software is quite convenient. I keep roaming turned off.

To get better performance from your android cell phones GPS firmware, you may want to look at this:
http://news.softpedia.com/news/How-t...2.shtmloftware tools.



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