Bring baby to ACC hut no-no or ok? - ClubTread Community

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post #1 of (permalink) Old 08-15-2013, 10:41 AM Thread Starter
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Default Bring baby to ACC hut no-no or ok?

My wife and I will be out west in September and would like to split up some hikes with overnights at ACC huts, I've stayed at a few huts in the winter but never in the summer.. is it bad form to bring a 4 month old baby to a hut for a night? She's been sleeping her nights for about a month now from 10-7 but there's always a chance she can wake up in the middle of the night for a feed which is usually preceded by 10-30 seconds of crying, the time it takes my wife to get her nipple out

I've spoken to ACC about this and they said the huts are open to everyone of all ages, but I'd like to know what people on here think, and please be honest The huts we're thinking about are Conrad Kain, Bow and Stanley Mitchell
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post #2 of (permalink) Old 08-15-2013, 11:09 AM
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I would think it's okay. If people really wanted peace and quiet they would bring their own tent. The snoring in those huts will probably eclipse the noise of your baby.

That said, I think one well taken care of baby in a hut is fine. But a dozen of them would be a bit annoying at night.
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post #3 of (permalink) Old 08-15-2013, 12:09 PM
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I would think that if your kid is a light sleeper you may find the huts to be a challenging space to get a full night sleep. I agree with Trick, snoring, farting and generally poor social skills of climbers will trump 30 seconds of baby crying.

On another note, Fuckin A that you are doing your thing with a baby!! Inspiring!
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post #4 of (permalink) Old 08-15-2013, 12:29 PM
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Kudos to you for taking baby out there.

Buy a box of ear plugs to distribute perhaps? =)
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post #5 of (permalink) Old 08-15-2013, 12:59 PM
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If it's a well-behaved kid, I think it's fine. People staying in huts pretty much all have earplugs anyways, and as others have said, adults can be noisier than a kid in there - snoring, people getting up at 2am for alpine starts, obnoxious grown-ups who bring iPod speakers, etc. That said, I think I would be a bit annoyed if someone brought a kid that they know cries all night non-stop. Apart from that, I think it's awesome that you're doing this and getting the kid introduced to the great outdoors at such an early age :-).

And for what it's worth, depending on what outdoor activities you're after, Stanley Mitchell may be the nicest hut with a kid if you're staying more than a night and just want to take it easier. It has the meadow, so easy to take simple walks, etc.
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post #6 of (permalink) Old 08-15-2013, 01:21 PM
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I would consider it bad form to bring a baby into a hut. Other adults may also make noise, but they're personally responsible for it, and you can tell them to quiet it down. Plus, bringing loud speakers and being a hut-shattering snorer is already in bad form, so doesn't justify other things.
Not so much for the night if the kid's as prone to sleeping through as anyone else, but just for the sake that babies cry and wail and make a lot of noise and poop indoors and all in the first place, I would not want to share a hut with one.
If it was a small one, and you could get some additional families to book it out yourselves, that would be excellent.
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post #7 of (permalink) Old 08-15-2013, 01:45 PM
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No, it's not alright. People are going there to relax, not to stress out over someone's baby. Same thing goes for people who snore. Basically, anything that annoys the general public should be avoided in public.
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post #8 of (permalink) Old 08-15-2013, 01:50 PM Thread Starter
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Hmm this is interesting because this is potentially the crowd we could face when entering the hut. Some people who think it's cool, some who are indifferent, and some who are not happy about it. Our goal isn't to piss anyone off, but it seems obvious that there's a portion of the hut going demographic that may not welcome our presence, like Arnold and Rachelo, which could make things awkward for everyone? Might need to re-think this afterall
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post #9 of (permalink) Old 08-15-2013, 02:50 PM
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There's going to be no way to tell if it will be okay or not. It's like a city hostel, you could luck out and have decent folk who are amiable or you could end up with a bunch of 20 year olds shagging into the night.

Personally, I wouldn't really have an issue with crying during the night as, others have said, it is seldom quiet anyway through the night in most huts. I always bring ear plugs.

What others might have an issue with is a baby being present in the hut after their climb. Conversations can cover all subjects under the sun, with expletives usual and alcohol being consumed with maybe some other organic produce being smoked. A baby being bounced on a knee in the corner is kinda a buzz kill to climbers who want to let loose after possibly a harrowing day in the mountains.

That is just one scenario. You could very well end up in the hut with a group that loves that you are getting your child into nature as early as possible.

You know, just roll the dice. Even if people do have an issue with it they aren't going to say anything about it. I'd feel it would be bad mountain karma to tell a mother and her child to get off my mountain. Don't let the opinions of others on the internet dictate what experiences you share with your child.

As the old Danish Proverb says: "He Who Builds According To Every Man's Advice Will Have A Crooked House."
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post #10 of (permalink) Old 08-15-2013, 03:20 PM
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I've stayed in many ACC huts with my kids (we didn't take them until they were 5) and [u]personally</u> I would have no problem with a baby provided the baby slept through the night and was generally a happy child, not colicky. I've stayed at huts where there have been worse things then a baby giving a short cry such as an idiot who drank too much and spent half the night barfing in the kitchen area. Way worse!

But it will really depend on your cabin mates and how tolerant they are. Also, some people may be very noisy for your baby so you may not find she sleeps as well there as at home. Personally, I would probably wait a until your child was older just to ensure no issues.

Cheers!
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post #11 of (permalink) Old 08-15-2013, 03:45 PM
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The problem with a 4 month old is you don't know how the trip and change of location is going to affect them. They may not like the altitude, if you hike into the higher elevations, for example. They may be affected by the change in water/food that your wife is taking in. A child who is great at home can be miserable on the road. That's something you can work through if it's just the three of you in a room or your own tent, but it's harder if you're with a larger group. It may only bother one person but that may be enough to ruin the trip for you and your wife. Maybe try car camping if you haven't done that already or pack a tent with you into the back country.
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post #12 of (permalink) Old 08-15-2013, 04:43 PM
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My experience:
A 4-month-old is a bit of a 'loose cannon'.
A toddler is actually easier--you can make them walk a lot and get them absolutely zonked, and they sleep through anything.

...but I still say go for it!
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post #13 of (permalink) Old 08-15-2013, 05:09 PM
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Can you go midweek when you could expect there to be fewer people? I would have no problem with a baby in a hut and I've considered bringing mine, but neither her nor her older brother are good sleepers when away from home. Maybe pack a tent as a backup? Home depot sells large packs of earplugs you could share... Good for you! I think it's great to get kids outside, although it certainly adds another dimension to trip planning!
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post #14 of (permalink) Old 08-15-2013, 05:12 PM
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I wouldn't recommend it. IMHO, I agree with the loose cannon comparison. You don't know the results; you shouldn't use unsuspecting hikers as test subjects. What will you do if the child does wail all night? Another reason: a four-month old has underdeveloped ear canals. Taking them to high altitude is not a good idea. They could sustain permanent hearing damage long before you figure out that is why they are fussy. Best try lower hikes with a private tent first. Again, just MHO.
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post #15 of (permalink) Old 08-15-2013, 06:15 PM
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by leimrod

Personally, I wouldn't really have an issue with crying during the night as, others have said, it is seldom quiet anyway through the night in most huts. I always bring ear plugs.

What others might have an issue with is a baby being present in the hut after their climb. Conversations can cover all subjects under the sun, with expletives usual and alcohol being consumed with maybe some other organic produce being smoked. A baby being bounced on a knee in the corner is kinda a buzz kill to climbers who want to let loose after possibly a harrowing day in the mountains.

That is just one scenario. You could very well end up in the hut with a group that loves that you are getting your child into nature as early as possible.

You know, just roll the dice. Even if people do have an issue with it they aren't going to say anything about it. I'd feel it would be bad mountain karma to tell a mother and her child to get off my mountain. Don't let the opinions of others on the internet dictate what experiences you share with your child.
An occasional short cry is one thing. A kid actually crying through the night is way more piercing and disruptive than a snorer.

I would have at least as much issue with anyone who tried to smoke (anything) inside the hut. that is completely uncool.

I'm all for getting your child into nature as early as possible. I think that's great. But you do it in ways that don't take away from the experience of others - you dayhike, you camp in tents where you're not right beside other people. And when the kid is old enough to be able to tell you when they hurt/are hungry/a loud noise happens instead of crying, then you take them into a hut.
I shared the Elizabeth Parker hut with an awesome kid of maybe 10 this year.

Even if people have an issue with a lot of things, politeness may keep their mouth shut. But qwimjim is thinking ahead and trying to be respectful of others and consider them when deciding how they will share the mountain experience with their child. Good for him. you don't do things that disrupt other people just because you're sure they won't actually tell you of.
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