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post #1 of (permalink) Old 07-10-2020, 01:11 PM Thread Starter
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Default Gear for Cape Scott

I'm looking at backpacking in Cape Scott either this summer or fall. Probably spending a couple of nights at Nel's Bight. I'm not sure if I have the right equipment for this trip though. I have a decent gore-tex jacket (Arcteryx Beta AR) and some gore-tex hiking boots. I usually prefer to hike in runners though to avoid blisters. I don't have rain pants. I have a good tent. Is the general idea that boots are needed for the hike to the coastline and then can maybe be swapped for a pair of runners? Or, can two pair of runners be used instead? Is it advisable to bring a pair of rain pants, and if so, should they be breathable? If I'm just wearing them around the campsite, cheaper pants should be ok? Lastly, is it advisable to bring a tarp - perhaps to make a shelter for cooking etc?

thanks
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post #2 of (permalink) Old 07-10-2020, 02:56 PM
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I am strongly against hiking in runners, be it mountains or beach. Main reason being ankle support. You can twist ankle crossing boulders, hit rock etc. If you are getting blisters in your hiking boots, it is because they don't fit well. Good, properly fitting hiking boots can be more comfortable than runners! For beach hike I'd also bring Keen sandals; this is for walking in surf, around camp etc. They can be tied easily at the back of your pack & are not problem to carry.



Tarp is good idea because if it rains too much you will need that shelter in the evening to dry off, cook food etc. Rain pants if you don't have them, standard fast drying hiking pants should be ok. Then simply change into dry pair of something your brought along for around the camp while these are drying off (under the tarp). Just don't wear cotton.
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post #3 of (permalink) Old 07-10-2020, 10:14 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by zeljkok View Post
I am strongly against hiking in runners, be it mountains or beach. Main reason being ankle support. You can twist ankle crossing boulders, hit rock etc. If you are getting blisters in your hiking boots, it is because they don't fit well. Good, properly fitting hiking boots can be more comfortable than runners! For beach hike I'd also bring Keen sandals; this is for walking in surf, around camp etc. They can be tied easily at the back of your pack & are not problem to carry.



Tarp is good idea because if it rains too much you will need that shelter in the evening to dry off, cook food etc. Rain pants if you don't have them, standard fast drying hiking pants should be ok. Then simply change into dry pair of something your brought along for around the camp while these are drying off (under the tarp). Just don't wear cotton.
Thanks. I think I have some old gaiters, are they worthwhile to bring? 32 years of hiking but Iíve never done any coastal hikes...

I think Iíve tried on every pair of hiking shoe/boot in Vancouver. I have small feet, size 7.5, which rules out 3/4 of available models. I also have a narrow heel but wide forefoot, which rules out most womenís shoes. The heel requires a really good fit or itís blister bonanza. I tape up before putting on shoes (lately been experimenting with duct tape) but that has limits. The best hikers I ever had were Nike Boltaro and itís low rise partner lava dome (I wore them in the Annapurna in early 90ís). Second best were some Garmont mid high that they no longer make. I replaced those with some Garmont Vetta and they give me blisters.
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post #4 of (permalink) Old 07-11-2020, 12:41 AM
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Thanks. I think I have some old gaiters, are they worthwhile to bring? 32 years of hiking but Iíve never done any coastal hikes...

I think Iíve tried on every pair of hiking shoe/boot in Vancouver. I have small feet, size 7.5, which rules out 3/4 of available models. I also have a narrow heel but wide forefoot, which rules out most womenís shoes. The heel requires a really good fit or itís blister bonanza. I tape up before putting on shoes (lately been experimenting with duct tape) but that has limits. The best hikers I ever had were Nike Boltaro and itís low rise partner lava dome (I wore them in the Annapurna in early 90ís). Second best were some Garmont mid high that they no longer make. I replaced those with some Garmont Vetta and they give me blisters.

I hear you. I have bunion size of small apple on my left foot whole life & it is huge pain with new shoes; took a long time till I found what works (Zamberlan for hiking, Keen for light stuff). There are also shops / businesses that do custom fitting.



Re gaiters: They weight little & take next to no space so I have them always in the pack even if I don't wear them all the time. Re Cape Scott -- think I heard of large muddy sections where they might be handy?
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post #5 of (permalink) Old 05-23-2021, 11:08 AM
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Old thread but I am sure it is still referenced. I am not usually a gaiter person but I was thankful for them for this hike! Did it last summer a few days after a rain and even with puddle dodging we were still covered in mud. Definitely worth the weight. The first couple km after you turn right were the worst but there were still wet areas further along too.
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post #6 of (permalink) Old 08-20-2021, 10:42 AM
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I agree. Hiking boots and gaiters are a must. We were knee deep in some sections and it was unavoidable. The only thing I whish I brought was a slightly larger knife to split wood with. We were so wet after each day from rain, humidity and sweat that having a fire was such a relief. We were able to dry out all of our gear after each day. We were able to split down the wood with a tiny knife to get to the dry stuff but wasn't easy and took a really long time. I'm sure there are others on here that will disagree with me on this but you're entitled to your own opinion.

Last edited by ChubbyTuna; 08-20-2021 at 10:44 AM.
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post #7 of (permalink) Old 08-24-2021, 08:05 PM
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I haven't been since 1975. In those days I wore loggers' caulk boots and full heavy rain gear.

Good thing I knew of four different hidden cabins with stoves in those days.
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