Death defying Photography - ClubTread Community

User Tag List

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of (permalink) Old 04-25-2014, 03:02 PM Thread Starter
Summit Master
 
zeljkok's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Anywhere but social media
Posts: 4,727
Default Death defying Photography

Enjoyed watching this clip.

Never heard before about "wing suit flying"
zeljkok is online now  
Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of (permalink) Old 04-26-2014, 10:39 AM
Scaling New Heights
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Chilliwack, BC, Canada.
Posts: 51
Default

jeb corliss is a crazy dude... look up a few more of his flights, and crazy crash at table top mountain.
matthorin is offline  
post #3 of (permalink) Old 04-26-2014, 10:16 PM
High on the Mountain Top
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Squamish, British Columbia, Canada.
Posts: 1,360
Default

This is probably the most insane wingsuit video I've seen. The guy must be flying less than a few feet off the deck. One of the wingsuit fliers in this video is now dead from a bad flight a few weeks ago.

Wingsuit flying I understand, even proximity flying next to cliffs, but proximity flying along the ground in a wingsuit is just mental.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gtJWKfsqrqQ
leimrod is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of (permalink) Old 04-27-2014, 01:51 AM
Summit Master
 
AcesHigh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Chilliwack, BC, Canada.
Interest: Women
Posts: 7,511
Default

Crazy...



AcesHigh is offline  
post #5 of (permalink) Old 04-28-2014, 09:41 AM
High on the Mountain Top
 
thecamel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Posts: 1,789
Default

To be fair though, you must get a taste of what it feels like to be superman....
thecamel is offline  
post #6 of (permalink) Old 04-28-2014, 11:07 PM Thread Starter
Summit Master
 
zeljkok's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Anywhere but social media
Posts: 4,727
Default

Besides the obvious "wow" reaction to wing-suit stuff, recurring thought in my mind was also "what constitutes a good photo", and this is perhaps why I posted the link here (This is Photography Forum after all).

In this modern high-tech HDR-ladden post-processing era, skilled Photoshop user can take rather ordinary frame and produce a masterpiece. I spoke once to a guy who was taking shots of Kits beach in Van. "This is just a blueprint for me. I spend 2hrs playing with it at home. You'd be amazed at results".

On the other hand if photo has something to say, "wow" factor will be natural reaction - even with no post-processing. This is the case here - everybody will look at wing-suit flyer, even if there is obvious dose of sensationalism involved. I read once article (perhaps even from link posted here, can't remember) about some National Geographic photographer who was chasing perfect picture of American bison for a year. Many hours, days, months spent on location with tripod, never quite satisfied with results. Then he nailed it. I wish I could find the photo to post it; it really did capture spirit of American West in unbelievable fashion. In other words, that photo had "something to say as well".

I am not advocating one way or the other, as both can produce amazing results. Just think it is great topic to discuss.
zeljkok is online now  
post #7 of (permalink) Old 05-01-2014, 08:47 AM
High on the Mountain Top
 
vern.dewit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Posts: 1,166
Default

Crazy. Also an interesting idea that some photos just seem to 'happen', while others take planning to execute. I find that formal landscapes can be taken from anywhere and often are from beside the Road or near a parking lot. For good, dynamic landscapes I need to be out there feeling it or I'm just not satisfied.

As an example, this one is from beside the road (hoodoo hike near Tunnel Mountain):


This one is more impactful and dynamic:


Both are hanging on my wall at 24"x48" and look great.
vern.dewit is offline  
post #8 of (permalink) Old 05-01-2014, 08:57 AM
tu
High on the Mountain Top
 
tu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Burnaby, BC, Canada.
Posts: 1,753
Default

Quote:
quote:Originally posted by zeljkok

I read once article (perhaps even from link posted here, can't remember) about some National Geographic photographer who was chasing perfect picture of American bison for a year. Many hours, days, months spent on location with tripod, never quite satisfied with results. Then he nailed it. I wish I could find the photo to post it; it really did capture spirit of American West in unbelievable fashion. In other words, that photo had "something to say as well".
http://www.theatlantic.com/video/arc...ograph/243936/
tu is offline  
post #9 of (permalink) Old 05-02-2014, 09:17 AM
Headed for the Mountains
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Wetcoast
Posts: 244
Default

Ansel Adams said “You don't take a photograph, you make it” and spent countless hours finding the perfect view, exposing film and working in the darkroom …filtering and dodging and burning away.

I think the same is true for moving pictures. There are many wing-suit flying, steep-skiing, waterfall-paddling videos that awe us because of mind-boggling human performance and the risks involved but then there are some that combine the action with stunning cinematography.

Maybe something like the paragliding videos of Jean-Baptiste Chandelier
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CjxkXNC31Z4
ClauS is offline  
post #10 of (permalink) Old 05-02-2014, 09:41 AM
Headed for the Mountains
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Posts: 181
Default

Quote:
quote:Originally posted by ClauS

Ansel Adams said “You don't take a photograph, you make it” and spent countless hours finding the perfect view, exposing film and working in the darkroom …filtering and dodging and burning away.

I think the same is true for moving pictures. There are many wing-suit flying, steep-skiing, waterfall-paddling videos that awe us because of mind-boggling human performance and the risks involved but then there are some that combine the action with stunning cinematography.

Maybe something like the paragliding videos of Jean-Baptiste Chandelier
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CjxkXNC31Z4
that paragliding - woww
can someone tell me, in terms in that i can understand, how hard was that to perform:
-5.13? 5.11?
-summiting mt robson or hiking up the chief?

looks incredibly easy and fun

lowclimber is offline  
post #11 of (permalink) Old 05-02-2014, 10:43 PM
Headed for the Mountains
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Wetcoast
Posts: 244
Default

Someone with average talent could fly along a ridge (in safe distance and good conditions) after a few days of training, maybe like leading 5.8 or 5.9 (note ‘leading' because there is more to it than making moves on a top rope ... a lot of empty space and no rope ). Dragging wingtips, hopping along on poles and touching the pointy bit on the lighthouse is more like 5.13. The guy in the video is one of the best in the world.
ClauS is offline  
post #12 of (permalink) Old 05-03-2014, 05:18 PM
Off the Beaten Path
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Whistler, BC, Canada.
Interest: snowboarding, photography, hiking, guitar
Posts: 633
Default

Planning is the process of putting yourself in the right place at the right time with the right gear, so you can execute when luck strikes.

Sometimes you get the shot you envisioned; often, the original concept was just a starting point or inspiration.

One thing is certain - if you aren't out there, you aren't getting the shot.


http://andrewstrain.photoshelter.com/#!/index/6
Andrew Strain is offline  
post #13 of (permalink) Old 05-03-2014, 09:24 PM
High on the Mountain Top
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Squamish, British Columbia, Canada.
Posts: 1,360
Default

Quote:
quote:Originally posted by zeljkok

I am not advocating one way or the other, as both can produce amazing results. Just think it is great topic to discuss.
The struggle of every photographer is to try and capture not what they have seen, but what they have felt.

Like this picture for example, we had been moving for nearly 9 hours to get to this point, and we weren't even half way done. The feeling of putting one foot in front of the other was present in my mind, and the sheer scale of the mountain we were trying to ascend had become clear.

I slowed and eventually stopped and waited for one of my hiking partners to get further away. Allowing him to become lilliputian accentuated the scale, and by focusing on the deep footprints in the snow I hoped to represent the struggle of forward progress.

In PP I decided upon stark chiaroscuro to make the landscape appear as ominous as it did that day and to hopefully imbue the viewer with the same sense of isolation that I was feeling.



In contrast, in this picture I felt really exposed, and likely put myself in a pretty precarious position. I was on a steep downhill slope of wind compacted volcanic sand that terminated in cliff bands below me. I had kicked out a little ledge, that kept disintegrating as I moved and shuffled around with my bag as I changed lenses. A strong katabatic wind was blowing from the large glaciers to my left. To my right were large spires of volcanic rock and in front of me was an expansive panorama. I tried to capture the exposure I felt and the scale of the scene around me but I feel that all of my captures fall short.



I remember watching a video recently by Camp4 Collective that kind of explains this obsession to capture a moment that visually has the ability to represent an intangible emotion.

They called it FOMAS or Fear Of Missing a Shot. Usually, that fear outweighs the, sometimes, rational fear that would otherwise stop me from putting myself in a dangerous location just for a photograph.

https://vimeo.com/82163553
leimrod is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome
 

Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.1