How do you guys carry your SLR? - Page 3 - ClubTread Community

User Tag List

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #31 of (permalink) Old 05-17-2011, 11:05 PM
High on the Mountain Top
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: , BC, Canada.
Posts: 2,463
Default

I've recently purchased a binocular harness and have been very happy with it so far.
http://www.vortexoptics.com/product/...-harness-strap

I put the normal neck strap around my neck and also use the harness. It keeps the camera held against my chest so that it isn't flopping around while hiking. When I need to take a picture, it's easy enough to lift it up to my eye without unclipping from the harness. As an added bonus, the harness distributes the weight nicely so that very little is actually resting on your neck.

Steventy is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #32 of (permalink) Old 05-17-2011, 11:28 PM
High on the Mountain Top
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: , bc, Canada.
Posts: 1,456
camshaft is offline  
post #33 of (permalink) Old 05-18-2011, 01:15 AM
High on the Mountain Top
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: , BC, Canada.
Posts: 2,463
Default

Quote:
quote:Originally posted by camshaft

this is something cool


http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/...stem?ref=email

That is cool.
Here is a similar product that can be purchased today:
http://www.spiderholster.com/black-widow-holster.html

With the Capture, I'd be worried about accidentally hitting that quick release button and having the camera drop. However, it does look like the better option for mounting on a backpack strap:
http://vimeo.com/23296217
Steventy is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #34 of (permalink) Old 05-18-2011, 08:16 AM
High on the Mountain Top
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Squamish, British Columbia, Canada.
Posts: 1,360
Default

Quote:
quote:Originally posted by Steventy

With the Capture, I'd be worried about accidentally hitting that quick release button and having the camera drop.
The secondary screw on the Capture is for locking the quick release from being accidentally pushed.

I like the idea of the Capture also, but the more I think about it, the more I appreciate even just a little padding for when I'd be scrambling.

My current DSLR carrying setup consists of a:

Thinktank Digital Holster 10 v2.0 case
2 x small/thin S-biners

With the s-biners I attach the case to my chest strap. Its the most comfortable setup I've found thus far, although for quick descents the camera does move (as the bottom isn't held down). The back of the case has a velcro strap for a belt so I may bring a light belt with me and use it to hold the bottom of the case down by putting it around my chest.

leimrod is offline  
post #35 of (permalink) Old 05-20-2011, 02:22 PM
Off the Beaten Path
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Burnaby, BC, Canada.
Posts: 966
Default

Quote:
quote:Originally posted by Hotelseven

I carry 2 cameras when I hike. I carry a Nikon D3S with a 70-200 f2.8 lens with a 2X TC attached. For that camera I use a Blackrapid strap slung over my shoulder. It gives me super fast accesibility for shots. My other camera is a Nikon D700 which I carry with a 24-70mm f 2.8 lens attached. I just got a Spider Pro Holster system for this and it works great. I don't even notice it is there!

This setup works really good and keeps my pack free for important things like food, etc
I am so Jealous of you!! I have the D200 and D300s but I would trade you straight up for sure!
rocker_man1 is offline  
post #36 of (permalink) Old 11-14-2011, 11:23 PM
Summit Master
 
BillyGoat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Chilliwack, BC, Canada.
Interest: Hiking, UL Backpacking, canoeing, snowshoeing
Posts: 7,376
Default

I recently purchased a neoprene camera body and lens protector by Zing designs:

http://www.tiffen.com/products.html?tablename=zing

This gives some decent protection against light rain and anything that it might bump into when slung around my shoulder while hiking. Works well for storing in my pack too.
BillyGoat is offline  
post #37 of (permalink) Old 11-15-2011, 05:07 AM
High on the Mountain Top
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: , BC, Canada.
Posts: 2,463
Default

Quote:
quote:Originally posted by BillyGoat

I recently purchased a neoprene camera body and lens protector by Zing designs:

http://www.tiffen.com/products.html?tablename=zing

This gives some decent protection against light rain and anything that it might bump into when slung around my shoulder while hiking. Works well for storing in my pack too.
Looks interesting. Did you buy it locally?
Steventy is offline  
post #38 of (permalink) Old 11-15-2011, 06:53 AM
Off the Beaten Path
 
Zoran's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Burnaby, BC, Canada.
Interest: Mountaineering;Bikepacking;Skiing
Posts: 584
Default

I love this. I have my LowePro but it's too large. I will buy one for sure.


Quote:
quote:Originally posted by BillyGoat

I recently purchased a neoprene camera body and lens protector by Zing designs:

http://www.tiffen.com/products.html?tablename=zing

This gives some decent protection against light rain and anything that it might bump into when slung around my shoulder while hiking. Works well for storing in my pack too.
Zoran is offline  
post #39 of (permalink) Old 11-15-2011, 08:57 AM
Summit Master
 
BillyGoat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Chilliwack, BC, Canada.
Interest: Hiking, UL Backpacking, canoeing, snowshoeing
Posts: 7,376
Default

I got it through B&H. They charge 23.00 but after shipping and border handling fees it was 43.00. I couldnt find anyone in Canada that sells them.
BillyGoat is offline  
post #40 of (permalink) Old 11-15-2011, 12:04 PM
Hittin' the Trails
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Posts: 38
Default

Back when I was younger and more foolish I would carry a Canon 5D2 + 16-35/2.8, 70-200/2.8 and at times a 300/2.8 in a ThinkTank Airport Antidote but soon realized I had no room for any other essential gear (ie. food, water, extra clothing) and all the camera gear was weighing me down. Because of this, I gave up with DSLRs for hiking and have been using a rangefinder for the last 18 months. It's about the same size as a small consumer DSLR but the lenses are generally smaller and lighter.

When hiking and scrambling, I use the inside padded liner from a ThinkTank Changeup to hold the camera and lenses while they're inside my hiking daypack (Osprey Talon and Hornet packs are amazingly light for their durability and support). The Osprey packs usually includes small pockets in the waist belt that I can stow a lens on each side when I want them readily accessible. When I'm actually hiking/scrambling, the spare lenses are kept in the waist belt and the camera is slung around my neck and shoulder. I find that by having the strap around one shoulder, it keeps the camera from bouncing around when I'm walking quickly or running down scree slopes. The only time I ever put away my camera is if I'm glissading down snow slopes, the rain really comes down hard, or if I'm down climbing steep ledges. One really convenient thing you can do if you want to stow your camera quickly is to put it inside a touque or neck warmer and stuff that into the top pocket of your hiking pack (works well for top loaders).

With this setup, I've done several hundred kilometers and tens of thousands of meters in elevation gain without ever damaging my gear.
BeeWee is offline  
post #41 of (permalink) Old 11-15-2011, 05:06 PM
Summit Master
 
BillyGoat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Chilliwack, BC, Canada.
Interest: Hiking, UL Backpacking, canoeing, snowshoeing
Posts: 7,376
Default

I use the LowePro padded lens cases attached to my hipbelt for quick access to my lenses. I've gone a bit lighter with my lens stable and now use the 330g Sigma 15mm F2.8 for my wide-angle, the Zeiss 16-80mm (440g) as my main lens and the 365g Minolta 135mm F2.8 for a short tele. All my backpacking lenses now each weigh less than a pound.
The nice thing with the lowepro padded lens cases is that they also have room for filters or other small items like lens cloths. I carry spare batteries in a small padded lowepro camera case.
BillyGoat is offline  
post #42 of (permalink) Old 07-03-2013, 02:14 PM
Hittin' the Trails
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Canada, British Columbia, Canada.
Posts: 8
Default

Quote:
quote:Originally posted by camshaft

this is something cool
http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/...stem?ref=email
I bought the above at (https://peakdesignltd.com/) and took it on a short 6km hike. I used my back up camera a Canon Rebel with no battery pack and small kit lens I attached it to my shoulder strap on my backpack. You hardly know it's there.

Getting the camera off and on was not as slick as I thought it would be but still quick. Mainly because of the angle and the weight / size of the pack its positioned not in a perfect manner. Well worth the $75 investment over hanging a camera around your neck while hiking.
paulsparrow is offline  
post #43 of (permalink) Old 07-04-2013, 09:56 PM
Scaling New Heights
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: , , .
Posts: 59
Default

Day Hikes: Sony a900 + 24-70mm straight in my day pack with other gear in LowePro carriers.

Multi Day Hikes: Sony a700. Rest of the gear varies with what I expect to capture but everything will fit in a LowePro TLZ2 with straps to my bag and then flip it over my head to be in front of my chest; bottom of TLZ2 bag has loops to attach to bag again to prevent swinging. Refer to the link below for the new version of the bag with factory chest strap.
http://www.lowepro.com/toploaderzoom

Typical setup: 11-18mm, 50mm macro, & flash GN42.
Gear I swap around with: 24-50mm, 28-75mm, 24mm, 16mm, 90mm and 20-40mm (this lens is heavy).

Of course the odd times I will settle to bring a small P&S camera but I never leave behind my camcorder (Sony GW77 or GoPro).
BCBoy88 is offline  
post #44 of (permalink) Old 07-05-2013, 08:42 AM
High on the Mountain Top
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Smurf Village, BC, Canada.
Interest: hiking, exploring, reading, random shiny things
Posts: 2,451
Default

I've come to the conclusion that the best way is GoPro style!

Seriously though, I just sling it across my chest with the camera strap. Easiest by far.
guntis is offline  
post #45 of (permalink) Old 08-30-2014, 06:56 PM
Headed for the Mountains
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Interest: You name it.
Posts: 331
Default

I use the Peak Design clip on my shoulder strap. Easy and fast to remove when I see something of interest on the trail. I love it!

https://peakdesign.com/store/?c=clips

Keep on Trekking,
Foxtrots
FOXTROTS is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome
 

Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.1