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post #1 of (permalink) Old 03-22-2010, 08:06 AM Thread Starter
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Default Tiger salamanders


I've read a couple of trip reports where people saw Coastal giant salamanders and there was some debate whether they were the more endangered tiger salamanders.

On Saturday I noticed that the Vancouver Aquarium has tiger salamanders and thought one or two people might be interested in seeing what they looked like:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xqk_SrOyMi4
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post #2 of (permalink) Old 03-25-2010, 09:06 PM
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Thanks Sam, I wondered what they looked like. Not exactly the prettiest looking batch.. these seem to be a contented lot.

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post #3 of (permalink) Old 03-25-2010, 09:25 PM
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I found this guy in October last year on Yahoo Creek at about 700m elev. No idea what he is. His length is about one inch.



I was surprised to find a salamander in such fast running and cold water. I thought they preferred warm stagnant ponds.
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post #4 of (permalink) Old 03-25-2010, 10:38 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks Karl. Amphibians are more "neat" than "cute" in my books.

Weedwhacker: that's a good find! I guess it is a young one and would probably be difficult to identify - habitat might be your best indicator. We have some weird amphibians here. The tailed frog also likes cold, rushing streams.
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post #5 of (permalink) Old 03-26-2010, 05:20 PM Thread Starter
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I think this is an ensatina. Based on the range and appearance. The only thing that doesn't fit is finding it in the water - apparently they are terrestrial.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ensatina

The other possibility (based on size and finding it in a cold rushing stream) is that it is a torrent salamader, but the closest range of any of the torrent salamanders is the Olympic Penninsula.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torrent_salamander
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post #6 of (permalink) Old 03-26-2010, 05:34 PM
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Thanks MOW.

Actually he was under a rock, about 5m away from the creek so he might not be aquatic. He didn't look like a lizard or a ginko though - the toes were wrong and his skin looked smooth and slimy.
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post #7 of (permalink) Old 03-30-2010, 08:57 AM
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Here's some information I dug up:

There is a myriad of cryptids in British Columbia, but one of the largest is known as the Pacific Giant Salamander or the Black Salamander.

They are found far and wide in China and Japan and are called Megalobatrachus. Whilst I concede that the Japanese and Chinese salamanders are pretty big at about four feet long, the ones that are reported from the Pitt Lake region are monstrous and start at six feet and some are said to be as long as 12 feet. They have been observed being equally comfortable on land or in water.

There have been sightings reported near the Fraser River between Rosedale and Hope, on the shores of Nitnat Lake, Cultus Lake and Chilliwack Lake . However it is at Pitt Lake where most of the recent sightings have been. The most recent was in late 2005, but it was the 2002 sighting by Pitt River Lodge owner, Dan Gerak, which has considerable credibility. Gerak is a wildlife enthusiast, outfitter, and guide.

On two occasions in late 2002, Gerak caught site of what he described as a giant black salamander in Pitt Lake where the lake meets the Pitt River at a bottleneck known as the Narrows. Gerak first saw the head of the animal followed by the body. It was a salamander in excess of five feet long. This sighting was by a seasoned outdoorsmen familiar with all the fauna in and around Pitt Lake. He does not misidentify animals.
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post #8 of (permalink) Old 03-30-2010, 09:27 AM Thread Starter
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Uh-huh
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post #9 of (permalink) Old 03-30-2010, 01:31 PM
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Great.
One more thing to worry about - marauding 12 foot salamanders.
I wonder if bear spray works on them?
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post #10 of (permalink) Old 03-30-2010, 03:09 PM
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Japanese-Giant-Salamander
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post #11 of (permalink) Old 03-31-2010, 10:04 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by midweekskier

Japanese-Giant-Salamander
Those giant salamanders are great
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post #12 of (permalink) Old 04-01-2010, 09:47 AM
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Don't forget about giant lizards:

The headwaters of Third Creek are located in the lake-studded alpine meadows surrounding the Five Fingers Spires. These alpine meadows are said to be the home of huge lizards, sometimes known as the Pitt Lake Giant; they also go by the name of the Canadian Alligator, or the Pitt lake Lizard, and some think it may be an unknown species of Monitor Lizard.

The huge lizards can be up to 15 feet long, are covered in hair that is longer on the head and thinner on the arms. They have horns behind the head and two rows of sharp teeth. Also reported, they have square-set shoulders with arms that hang below the knees. Their paws are the size and shape of kayak paddles and their four-toed feet, about 24 inches long, leave a pink tint in the snow. This was observed from tracks reported in the snow northwest of Pitt Lake. The tracks were followed by a group of hunters and a large creature was observed. The creature remained still but when the hunters returned later in the day, the creature was gone.

Pitt Lake has also produced the capture of a large horned lizard that has not yet been classified in the realms of zoology.
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post #13 of (permalink) Old 04-01-2010, 10:18 AM
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But do they breathe fire?
Those are the hardest ones to deal with.
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post #14 of (permalink) Old 04-01-2010, 03:01 PM
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by gchicalo


Pitt Lake has also produced the capture of a large horned lizard that has not yet been classified in the realms of zoology.
???? any info to back this up?
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post #15 of (permalink) Old 04-02-2010, 09:47 AM
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MOW - I believe the little fellow might be a 'red eft' - a life-stage of the common Rough-skinned Newt. A lot of these newts (once called the Western Newt) enter the terrestrial 'eft' stage after the larval (tadpole) stage for years before metamorphosizing into the final adult stage. I came across one years ago hiking with a guy who is a biology teacher who explained this to me!
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