3D Pics - Stereograms and Anaglyphs - ClubTread Community

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post #1 of (permalink) Old 10-23-2007, 02:43 PM Thread Starter
Dax
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Default 3D Pics - Stereograms and Anaglyphs

In this thread you may only post 3D pictures.

There are 2 types of 3D photos:

Stereograms are those shots where you have 2 similar pictures side by side, when you cross your eyes a third picture appears in the middle, if you can focus on the third image it will be in 3D! These are great because with a little practice anyone can view them and no special software or equipment is required.

Example of a stereogram, taken at the end of Diez Vistas:





An anaglyph is a stereogram that has been processed by special software, one image is shifted to the blue spectrum and one image is shifted to the red spectrum. The photos are then overlaid on top of eachother and can be viewed by anyone who has special 3D glasses like you used to get with the 3D comic books when you were growing up. These are great because it takes no effort or practice to view them.

Example of an anaglyph made from the previous photo:



I will now reveal my TOP-SECRET, classified techniques for taking 3D pictures. You all must swear to take these secrets to the grave.

Step 1: Find a scene that will look cool in 3D. It must be a still scene like a building or a mailbox, not a moving scene like an intersection or a flying bird. It should also have an obvious foreground and background to make the 3D effect stand out. It is OK to have multiple depths of field, such as a person standing in front of a group of trees with a mountain in the background. (3 depths of field)

Step 2: Set your focus to infinity, the whole shot should be "in focus" if you use a cheap point and shoot camera like I do, this step is fairly redundant...

Step 3: Using the "viewfinder" on your camera and not the LCD on the back frame your shot as you would like it and take the picture with the viewfinder on your left eye.

Step 4: Here is the magic: Don't move your head, slide the camera over to your right eye and take the SAME shot with the SAME framing.

Step 5: When you get home load up both pictures in your favorite photo editing software, crop the pictures so they are framed EXACTLY the same and the main subject in your photo is at the same "height" in both shots. Copy both photo's into one wide photo and leave a small white or black line between the shots to make it easier for your brain to sort everything out when you are viewing the 3D picture.

Your done! It really is that easy! If you want to process your shots into anaglyphs you can use this free software: http://www.callipygian.com/3D/
I wont go into details on how to use it as there is a good set of instructions on the website.

Now everyone go out, climb a mountain and take some 3D pictures. Then come back here and post them up for the rest of us to see. I expect results by noon tomorrow! (kidding)

More Stereograms:









More Anaglyphs:





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post #2 of (permalink) Old 10-23-2007, 03:39 PM
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The illusion of depth in 3D photos is created by the distance between the photos. Your technique (moving camera from eye to eye) will create photos with a simulated depth comparable to what you would see in real life. The further apart you move the camera between the two shots, the greater the illusory 3rd dimension will appear to be. Likewise, with no distance between the camera, 3d illusion will not exist, producing a flat effect.
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post #3 of (permalink) Old 10-23-2007, 03:51 PM
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Technically it's the angle between photos, not the distance. If you move the camera further away from the subject, but keep the shots the same distance apart, the 3D effect will diminish the further away you are from the subject. If you maintain a constant angle by increasing the distance between shots as you move further away, the 3D effect will remain. I occasionally have to calculate the distance between aerial photos in order to obtain stereo photography for topo mapping. The higher the plane is, the further the plane has to fly before taking the next shot, but the angle between the plane and the centers of successive photos remains nearly the same. Basically what Dru said (but the correct way to explain it ).
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post #4 of (permalink) Old 10-23-2007, 03:58 PM
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If you want people to see the 3D effect in the stereo pairs posted here, keep the on-screen distance between the same objects in the two photos shorter than the distance between your eyes. Otherwise you would need to force your eyes to look away from one another in order to see 3D. Alternatively, you could put the right photo on the left and the left photo on the right (which I see is what you've done), then cross your eyes to see the effect, but this could lead to some nasty eye strain depending on how cross-eyed you had to be and how close you were to the computer. I can see yours just fine at about three feet away.
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post #5 of (permalink) Old 10-23-2007, 04:14 PM Thread Starter
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Those are good tips magnetite. I had been cramming my face close to the screen and then crossing my eyes to get the 3D effect. It does seem much easier to view the pictures from about 3' away.

Also, the angle between the photos is just a function of the distance from the subject and the distance between the lense(s) taking the shot. I get what you are saying, but I thought that it was fairly obvious geometry...

I have played around with exaggerating the 3D effect by taking a half step to the right before taking the second photo but I found that the most "natural" 3D effect is achieved when you use the distance between your eyes, as this is what your brain is used to.

Some people will go through all the trouble of mounting 2 of the same cameras side be side so they can take 3D shots of live action scenes as shown in this example:



Crap I just broke rule number 1 of this thread!

Also this guy setup frame syncing between 2 consumer level video cameras to get 3D video on the cheap!

http://www.hackaday.com/2007/10/14/3...sumer-cameras/

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post #6 of (permalink) Old 10-23-2007, 04:31 PM
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Did you know that method was used to calculate the distance to stars? They photographed the same portion of space six months apart, when the earth is on the opposite side of the sun, at a distance of approximately 300,000,000 km between cameras! Apparently that creates enough parallax (3D effect) to calculate the relative distances to several hundred stars.
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post #7 of (permalink) Old 10-24-2007, 12:56 AM
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That tree shot is giving me such a headache! Much easier to get the effect where there is a really obvious subject to center in on. There the effect is very pronounced but also a little weird in that the subject appears pretty 2-dimensional but there is a pronounced 3D effect with different parts of the background.

Fun!
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post #8 of (permalink) Old 10-24-2007, 01:29 AM
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Where can one buy 3D glasses locally this day and age?



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post #9 of (permalink) Old 10-24-2007, 08:37 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by AcesHigh

Where can one buy 3D glasses locally this day and age?
I got some from the gift shop at science world. I have also seen them in arts and craft type stores.

If you buy the spy kids 3D DVD you get a pair: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...70356?v=glance

You can also order them online:
http://www.3dglassesonline.com/
http://www.rainbowsymphony.com/
http://www.3dglasses.com/free3d.htm (free if you pay shipping)

Or you can make your own from some card stock and red and blue cellophane.
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