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post #1 of (permalink) Old 07-14-2003, 09:19 AM Thread Starter
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Default Photo Taking Question

What is the best way of capturing steepness? All too often my pictures flatten out what should normally be a picture of a steep slope.

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post #2 of (permalink) Old 07-14-2003, 09:52 AM
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Keep your camera looking straight ahead, or even a little bit upwards. Don't look down the slope.

I like to crouch right to the ground, and point my camera at about a 55 degree angle. Just a LITTLE bit upwards. Makes the hills look really steep.

Try it with stairs. You'll see what I mean.

PS. By crouching down, the hill starts RIGHT at the bottom of the picture, increasing the depth.


Edited by - Spirit on 07/14/2003 09:53:14 AM
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post #3 of (permalink) Old 07-14-2003, 12:46 PM
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i think spirit has it right on the money. i'm a terrible photographer and haven't quite mastered the technique yet, but i took this shot last year on the way up to panorama ridge (garibaldi) and the shadows give the illusion of steepness, too.

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post #4 of (permalink) Old 07-14-2003, 12:50 PM
 
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Love the picture. I do the same thing when I am looking for some depth in a picture.

"Eventually, all things merge into one. And a river runs through it."
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post #5 of (permalink) Old 07-14-2003, 12:54 PM
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That's a great picture, quirkygal.

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post #6 of (permalink) Old 07-14-2003, 05:01 PM
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thanks! er... i just realized that i can't take credit for the photo... <img src=icon_smile_blush.gif border=0 align=middle> my brother's girlfriend snapped it with my camera when i had her take it out of my pack.
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post #7 of (permalink) Old 07-14-2003, 10:58 PM
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Yah, the low to the ground thing works well. In general, it is a really useful photo technique that gives you all sorts of possibilities.



I did that for this photo with my camera almost touching the water surface, and as a result the rocks 3 feet in front of me, which were no taller than a foot high, look like they could be a mountain range.

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post #8 of (permalink) Old 07-15-2003, 10:28 AM
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what a wild effect! nice job!
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post #9 of (permalink) Old 07-24-2003, 03:55 PM
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I think if you have objects that should be of similar scale, you can create some interesting perspective based shots. Also, if capturing people in the shot, their body position really helps to demonstrate the steepness. Here are a couple taken recently of our trip to the Chilkoot when going over the pass.







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post #10 of (permalink) Old 07-26-2003, 01:27 AM
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Excellent advice I've wondered how to get the best effect myself,so many times I've wanted to express the steepness of a hill and always lose the effect.

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post #11 of (permalink) Old 07-26-2003, 08:32 AM
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To show the severity of a slope, or even exagerate it, use a wide angle lens. 28mm to 35mm should suffice.
If, instead, you zoom in on the feature, it tends to become compact in appearance.

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post #12 of (permalink) Old 07-28-2003, 08:45 PM
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Another way is showing people crossing the slope. There are lots of skree shots like this.
It also gives a good sense of perspective. If you can't see him, Drifter is on the right hand side.



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post #13 of (permalink) Old 07-28-2003, 09:13 PM
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I have a question, without bothering to write-up a whole new thread, what kind of film do you use?
I try to match film to subject and environment. Here are a few things I've learned:

Fuji: excellent in cold colours (green, blue, indigo) but lacking in warm colours and some flesh tones (red orange yellow)
Kodak: excellent in flesh tones and warm colours but lacking coldness (green foliage tends to grey out, blues need more red for contrast)
Agfa: excellent in earth tones (browns, yellows, greys) average with greens, reds unknown.

As for grain quality, you get what you pays for. Expect the cheap stuff to be less crisp than higher end films.

Speed: From using my first point and shoot, I've discovered to not use anything slower than 200 ISO (even in bright sunny conditions [the lens is too slow]) 400 is good in overcast, 800 for night shots concerts and clubing.
My two SLR's which have time and aperture controls, can handle as low as 50 ISO, but with the help of a tri-pod.

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Edited by - nomad on 07/28/2003 9:15:33 PM
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post #14 of (permalink) Old 07-28-2003, 09:45 PM
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I've had some great results from Fuji's Velvia & Provia slide film. Problem is they are slow ISO (50 & 100), so I consistently 'push' the rating - I double them to 100 or 200 ISO. I just let Lens & Shutter (I only trust them with this) know I've pushed the film. Fuji NPS is also nice: like Kodak it gives warmth to skin but it does wonders in sunny weather too.
I have one more thing to add: I've seen some terrific results from the cheapest film and it reminds me that I can buy the most expensive film, but it doesn't necessarily mean it will look better than the cheap film I sometimes throw in my camera!


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post #15 of (permalink) Old 07-28-2003, 11:37 PM
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I pretty much always use Fuji Velvia and Provia since I am generally taking photos of landscapes, which usually involve at least some green. I wouldn't mind trying out Kodak for some of my sunset shots though. For speeds, Velvia only comes in ISO 50, so I use that. For others, I use either 100 or 400. I don't bother with 200, since the difference in the exposure isn't all that significant from 100 or 400. BTW, Provia is available in 200 and 400 as well as 100. I buy my film from Lens & Shutter as well.

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