What Canadian City to Move To (from US)? - Page 2 - ClubTread Community

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post #16 of (permalink) Old 03-06-2021, 02:39 PM
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..... Chilliwack River Valley.K
Unfortunately, it is heavily traveled and a place for homeless as well as a dumping ground for unwanted RV's and trailers. Last year, there was 1 large RV and 2 abandon trailers in different places that were eventually hauled away. One trailer still had clothes and stuff inside.
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post #17 of (permalink) Old 03-06-2021, 03:32 PM
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Unfortunately, it is heavily traveled and a place for homeless as well as a dumping ground for unwanted RV's and trailers. Last year, there was 1 large RV and 2 abandon trailers in different places that were eventually hauled away. One trailer still had clothes and stuff inside.
awful, I was unaware of this kind of scale. Seen a lot of the regular garbage left behind in many places from campers; and/or just those tOo cheap to PAY dumping fees unloading their crap on nature.

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Hiking is what keeps you young of mind and heart. When the going gets tough, the tough get going..............
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post #18 of (permalink) Old 03-06-2021, 04:48 PM
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He is not considering Fraser Valley anyways & has narrowed selection to Nelson/Rossland/Kimberley


iron, sounds like you have done plenty of research. Of the 3 I'd probably pick Kimberley. Reason: Easy access to Rockies, day trips possible. Valley gets plenty of sunshine but won't be as cold as Alberta gets in winter. Also amenities are decent. I don't know if you ski, but if you do obviously it's a big plus. I had generally good vibe driving through Kimberly & not so good in Nelson (very subjective). I was never in Rossland, but looking at map it just seems too far from everything.
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post #19 of (permalink) Old 03-06-2021, 08:45 PM
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Bingo on Kimberley. We stay there once a year, usually in late september.

Many good aspects to that town. Sunny. Outstanding Rocky, Purcell, Selkirk mountain access. Superb hiking, good skiing and excellent mountain biking all up and down the rocky mountain trench from Kimberley to Golden (we lived in Golden years ago). Close enough to Cranbrook for 'big' retail + services. The NorthStar Rails to Trails walking, running biking paved trail is amazing April to october. A road biker's dream. lots of snow and it lasts a long time being at about 4000'

Have you looked into Invermere, north of kimberley? Funky, small downtown main street with lots of local merchants. Panorama ski resort 18 km away (4200' vertical for skiing). Invermere has less snow than Kimberley, milder climate than other places in the Rocky Mountain Trench. Sunny, well serviced. Beautiful big lake windermere, awesome summer+winter. Excellent access to all mountain ranges, great mountain biking/hiking. The new West Side Legacy paved path let's you bike ride 30 km from Invermere to Fairmont hot springs with the lake to one side, Purcell mountains to the other. More expensive housing than Kimberley from what I've seen and it's farther from major services but the town is well equipped

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post #20 of (permalink) Old 03-07-2021, 12:09 AM
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I think Matt Gunn lived there for awhile, not sure Invermere or Kimberley. This is how "Hikes around Invermere" came to be
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post #21 of (permalink) Old 03-07-2021, 11:22 AM
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I think Matt Gunn lived there for awhile, not sure Invermere or Kimberley. This is how "Hikes around Invermere" came to be
Yes, exactly. I believe at one time he was a planning officer with the recreation dept of the town of Kimberley. Now he does that in Squamish, I think. The owner of the outdoor store in Invermere told me that Gunn and his friend Aaron Cameron were still hoping to produce an updated version of "Hikes around Invermere". That still is my go-to book for hikes in the mountains around the Columbia valley, even though it's getting very outdated.

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post #22 of (permalink) Old 03-12-2021, 02:07 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks all for the input (I didn't get notifications via email from CT, but checked back on a whim).


My wife and I have decided on Kimberley and will be bringing our kids at the end of July. Looking forward to joining the community there and someday, when the kids are a bit older, on this forum like I have on nwhikers.net back in the day.



And to allay fears that were noted in some PM's to me:
My wife and I have a strong pull towards the mountains. We're not trying to escape some covid hellhole and become parasites in the Kootenays and capitalize on these small towns. We're hard workers, good people, and will make a positive impact to the town.
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post #23 of (permalink) Old 03-12-2021, 02:35 AM
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There's much to like in Kimberley. You must get some hikes in down the St Mary Valley. The hourglass lakes, mt Evans, many others... Keep us posted on your plans and WELCOME TO CANADA!

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post #24 of (permalink) Old 03-20-2021, 12:55 AM Thread Starter
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Question on vehicles:



We have a 2014 Outback. Will this be adequate for most access to the Kootenay trailheads and non-trailhead (like general forest service road for the sake of peakbagging)? Or, are we looking at a truck eventually? I don't really see getting a snowmobile for the sake of backcountry ski access, and if that did happen, it'd be 10 years down the road anyway.
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post #25 of (permalink) Old 03-20-2021, 09:51 AM
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Question on vehicles: We have a 2014 Outback. Will this be adequate for most access to the Kootenay trailheads and non-trailhead (like general forest service road for the sake of peakbagging)?
Every year road conditions changes. The Outback has good ground clearance but it also depends on the suspension & tires. Toyota trucks would have higher clearance and more rugged suspensions. I've always owned either a Toyota truck or 4-Runner when I lived in the West Kootenays. You should make it to Gibson Lake in Kokanee Glacier Park without problems. Other access points require a truck & some are even closed permanently. For BC Parks, wait until the Trail Report comes out as they not only list trail conditions but road conditions. Just don't forget the chicken wire to protect your vehicles from porcupines if staying overnight somewhere however I think it's even a good idea to use chicken wire even for daily hikes.
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post #26 of (permalink) Old 03-20-2021, 03:18 PM
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If vehicle question is also related to process of importing to Canada, this is not an issue. I had to do it when I moved from US and it is straightforward. You ask for form on the border & take it to mechanic licensed for this kind of inspections (Canadian Tire is one). They check it & fix if something needs to be fixed. Once done they stamp the form & send to Ottawa. In few weeks you get back the form that will allow you go register vehicle in Canada, as well as sticker that goes at inside of driver door that states car was legally imported to Canada


Main adjustment as far as driving goes is that everything is metric here, km not miles, and if your car was bought in US miles will be on outside circle of your odometer. So you will have to adjust to look at inner circle where kilometers are when checking your speed. Everything else is the same
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post #27 of (permalink) Old 03-20-2021, 04:48 PM
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Originally Posted by iron View Post
Question on vehicles:



We have a 2014 Outback. Will this be adequate for most access to the Kootenay trailheads and non-trailhead (like general forest service road for the sake of peakbagging)? Or, are we looking at a truck eventually? I don't really see getting a snowmobile for the sake of backcountry ski access, and if that did happen, it'd be 10 years down the road anyway.
the outback's a good vehicle, be prepared for self-rescue and make sure you have good off-road tires. I'm a Jeep guy but right now I'm running a Mitsubishi Outlander kind of similar to the Outback. Not as good but usable for 70% of what you need. I have never used chicken wire on my tires in 40 years of exploring that area during day hikes. But overnight I would because of porcupine problems

Not sure when you think you will arrive, but be mindful that the south facing slopes of the Purcell and Selkirk mountains are notorious for high tick populations in the spring. Especially the grassy areas, like the Kimberly nature park which has a lot of great hiking trails and walking trails be careful of ticks in the grassy areas.

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post #28 of (permalink) Old 03-21-2021, 12:08 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks.


We'll be arriving in late July so hopefully not too many ticks then. Bummer that there are ticks though; one of the nice things about currently living in the Pacific Northwest (though ticks are becoming more common)
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post #29 of (permalink) Old 03-21-2021, 12:17 AM
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Thanks.


We'll be arriving in late July so hopefully not too many ticks then. Bummer that there are ticks though; one of the nice things about currently living in the Pacific Northwest (though ticks are becoming more common)

Ticks are May. June/July are mosquitoes and August is horse flies Then in September frost kills them all & this is in general the best hiking month in Canada.


I regularly shake ticks off every spring. Once the sucker lodged itself in my neck for 48 hrs before I spotted him, was hard to yank it out. It's all part of the outdoors
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post #30 of (permalink) Old 03-21-2021, 12:37 AM
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Thanks.


We'll be arriving in late July so hopefully not too many ticks then. Bummer that there are ticks though; one of the nice things about currently living in the Pacific Northwest (though ticks are becoming more common)
Ticks in spring are most troublesome at lower elevations, in the trench and surrounding valleys. Just be mindful of grassy areas or open canopy pine/spruce forests with shrub+grass understory. Always worse on the warmer south + east facing slopes soon after snow melt.

Summer is not usually bad for ticks but, as Zeljkok noted sometimes bugs are. True especially close to the Columbia River.

None of this detracts from the wonder of the Canadian Rockies, Purcells + Selkirks...it's just part of things

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