Canadian Climber who died on Everest: 5th Estate - ClubTread Community

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post #1 of (permalink) Old 09-13-2012, 08:10 PM Thread Starter
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Default Canadian Climber who died on Everest: 5th Estate

This case looks like there is confusion in placing responsibility; to the guiding company or the Canadian Climber who died with insufficient oxygen. Really sad, but a lesson here. Better to go with Experienced outfitters, not otherwise.

[u]Exercepts from story below:</u>
.....A Nepalese expedition company that guided a Toronto woman who died on Mount Everest allowed her to climb with less-experienced sherpas and should have known she would run out of oxygen, an investigation by CBC's the fifth estate has found.

Shriya Shah-Klorfine, 33, was one of six people who died on the mountain on the weekend of May 19, 2012.

The Torontonian had long dreamed of reaching the 8,848-metre summit. With no climbing experience, she paid Utmost Adventure Trekking, a company that she learned of through family in Nepal, almost $40,000 to guide her.

During her training, Shah-Klorfine had to be taught almost everything, including how to put crampons on her boots.

As the date for her climb approached, however, Utmost Adventure's most senior sherpa apparently changed his mind about guiding Shah-Klorfine to the summit. He told her she could kill herself and her sherpas if she attempted to climb Everest, the fifth estate found.

Thakuri told the fifth estate he tried to convince her to turn around.

"Even if we say you cannot go, you have to go down, strongly. She says like no, I spent money and my goal is to reach to summit. And anyhow I will go. So in this case, we cannot do anything."

She refused to turn around, and Thakuri gave her one last bottle of oxygen and let her keep climbing.

After about 19 hours of climbing, Shah-Klorfine made it to the summit at about 2:20 p.m. on May 19, and spent almost half an hour there revelling in the moment.

Raj Kadel says the sherpas didn't tell him about her dwindling oxygen supply.

"They just said we're on the way back."

Full article found here....

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/exclusive-c...014504780.html

Hiking is what keeps you young of mind and heart. When the going gets tough, the tough get going..............
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post #2 of (permalink) Old 09-13-2012, 11:36 PM
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This sounds like the same mentality as the numerous people who, for their first hike, or the only hike they will do in a year, ignore the warnings and choose to do the West Coast Trail. It would be interesting to study their thought process. It would also be interesting to know what proportion of the hikers evacutated from the WCT fall into this group.
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post #3 of (permalink) Old 09-13-2012, 11:54 PM
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by KARVITK

... Better to go with Experienced outfitters, not otherwise.
Karl, I wouldn't place so much blame on the outfitters. Seems like a caveat emptor to me (misplaced consumerism). Bad idea to "buy an Everest Summit off the shelf" without any personal first hand knowledge or experience of what the requirements and responsibilities are. The relationship between the purchaser and seller has tragic fail written all over it.
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post #4 of (permalink) Old 09-14-2012, 07:21 AM
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She had no climbing experience.

She had no high altitude experience.

If she really didn't know the state of her O2 supply, she should have paid attention instead of relying on others.

The sherpas and guides have no ability to "make" someone do something. They can only recommend.

Everest is a massive clusterfuck of bottlenecks and inexperienced climbers and I'm shocked that fatality rates aren't a lot higher.
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post #5 of (permalink) Old 09-14-2012, 08:07 AM
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She didn't need to go with a better guiding outfit. She needed to go with a better climbing resume.
Sure, you can book with a company who will hold your hand right to the south col, but you have no business being there if you need that. When you book with a lower support outfit, it's assumed that you know enough to make your own decisions. I seem to remember hearing at the time that her sherpas told her to turn around, and she refused. She made her own choice not to prepare for the trip, and blaming it on anyone else is ridiculous.
I'd you decide to attept Everest with no climbing or mountaineering experience, no altitude experience, and no pparent clue, you reap what you sow. I only hope you don't put anyone else in danger trying to help (let alone your family clamouring for others to risk their lives just to recover your corpse).
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post #6 of (permalink) Old 09-14-2012, 09:44 AM
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Quote:
quote:
The Torontonian had long dreamed of reaching the 8,848-metre summit. With no climbing experience, she paid Utmost Adventure Trekking, a company that she learned of through family in Nepal, almost $40,000 to guide her.
$40,000?!?!?!

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post #7 of (permalink) Old 09-14-2012, 10:30 AM
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by cutthroat22

Quote:
quote:
The Torontonian had long dreamed of reaching the 8,848-metre summit. With no climbing experience, she paid Utmost Adventure Trekking, a company that she learned of through family in Nepal, almost $40,000 to guide her.
$40,000?!?!?!

That's cheap for Everest.
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post #8 of (permalink) Old 09-14-2012, 03:07 PM
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[/quote]

That's cheap for Everest.
[/quote]

Wow indeed it is I had no idea.
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post #9 of (permalink) Old 09-14-2012, 06:30 PM
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by johngenx

She had no climbing experience.

She had no high altitude experience.

If she really didn't know the state of her O2 supply, she should have paid attention instead of relying on others.

The sherpas and guides have no ability to "make" someone do something. They can only recommend.

Everest is a massive clusterfuck of bottlenecks and inexperienced climbers and I'm shocked that fatality rates aren't a lot higher.
Quote:
quote: But Shah-Klorfine was using a lot more oxygen than other climbers due to the fact that she kept it flowing at a high rate, began using it earlier in her climb than most and spent a longer time on the mountain.
But, it sounds like this is exactly what she needed to do. She chose her path, no need to make someone else responsible.
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post #10 of (permalink) Old 09-14-2012, 07:39 PM
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For $40,000 they get you to the summit.
Getting down again.... priceless!
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post #11 of (permalink) Old 09-14-2012, 11:15 PM
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There's also an article in the latest issue of Explore that sheds some light on her trip.

She remortgaged her house and it was closer to 100,000 she paid. The company had never guided anyone up Everest before (although I believe the sherpas had been up). They carried 9 bottles of O2 up which is an extraordinary amount and it still wasnt enough for her. She was told to turn around but said no. She apparently showed up to the Hillary Step (I believe) alone, skipped in front of the crowd waiting and clipped in and then took an hour on that section which normally takes 10 minutes.

There were multiple things that happened and I agree that she shouldnt have been there with no experience. Most operators work to ensure that their clients are capable and assess their skills prior to attempting Everest. Another Canadian guide said that he pulled someone backwards and did make them go down because he didnt think the client would make it.
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post #12 of (permalink) Old 09-15-2012, 07:34 AM
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For the record usually five or six bottles of oxygen is the norm, or at least it was in 2005.
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post #13 of (permalink) Old 09-15-2012, 09:06 PM
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It should be about personal responsibility.....If you do NOT have the skill and experience stay home.

To me it all comes down to Darwinism.
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post #14 of (permalink) Old 09-15-2012, 11:00 PM
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Sounds like altitude sickness - judgement severely affected. Even very experienced people make fatal mistakes under its spell.

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post #15 of (permalink) Old 09-16-2012, 07:10 AM
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This is was her decision. She decided to climb without any skills training. She decided to use the services of a an unproven guiding operating. She decided to rely on others.

She erred, and died. No biggie...
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