MV = Metro Vancouver Mt. Harvey update - Page 2 - ClubTread Community

User Tag List

 24Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #16 of (permalink) Old 04-15-2017, 01:19 PM
Headed for the Mountains
 
woodenshoes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Canmore, AB
Posts: 272
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by spacemonkey View Post
I don't do much winter season hiking so I have to ask. Is it ever safe to hike on a cornice? I would think one would want to walk as far from the edge as possible. How would one assess for safety?
the problem always is, is trying to assess where the cornice starts and stops for lack of a better term. Or, where it might be supported and where not. Better just to stay off the wicked things. Any time I've been on one I've always been on a rope with the belayer below me. That way should I go thru my fall can be arrested instead of my belayer descending with me. This is the largest one I've seen and been near; on Mount Robson's summit. Believe me, it's far larger than it looks
Attached Images
 
woodenshoes is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #17 of (permalink) Old 04-16-2017, 02:32 AM
High on the Mountain Top
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Smurf Village, BC, Canada.
Interest: hiking, exploring, reading, random shiny things
Posts: 2,451
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by woodenshoes View Post
the problem always is, is trying to assess where the cornice starts and stops for lack of a better term. Or, where it might be supported and where not. Better just to stay off the wicked things. Any time I've been on one I've always been on a rope with the belayer below me. That way should I go thru my fall can be arrested instead of my belayer descending with me. This is the largest one I've seen and been near; on Mount Robson's summit. Believe me, it's far larger than it looks
Yes, this would be best practice. Conservative approach, roped up. But realistically, Mt Harvey is traditionally a pretty safe destination. No one would be roped up (unless coming up from the ramp on the north side).

Also, a cornice doesn't simply break off with a vertical cut. When it "breaks", the snow that goes with it slides off at a diagonal. So it's possible the people thought they were far enough back. But snow pack was massive so it could have been underestimated.

It's a tragedy that I've thought about a lot. I find it hard to find fault in this incident. Conditions were unusual and it's quite possible that it was difficult to identify the danger. My thoughts go out to the families.
Zoran, mazeGirl, Dac-van and 3 others like this.
guntis is offline  
post #18 of (permalink) Old 04-18-2017, 04:20 PM
Headed for the Mountains
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Coquitlam, BC, Canada.
Posts: 113
Default

I've thought about this a lot as well. Could this have happened to me? Quite possibly, yes. I've been up there a couple of times, which I suppose leads to a feeling of false confidence.

Plus, as guntis's illustration nicely illustrated, the snow can hide where the real summit is. If there's enough snow, it can make the summit appear to be farther out than it really is. Even if you assumed the worst, and stayed just behind the highest point, you could still end up getting caught in the cornice break.

Quite sobering, really.
BlackPete is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #19 of (permalink) Old 04-18-2017, 09:22 PM
Headed for the Mountains
 
dlofting's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: North Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Posts: 258
Default

I've never been up Mt Harvey. Is the lee slope as shown in guntis' diagram, which looks to be about 45 degrees, or is it closer to vertical ?
dlofting is offline  
post #20 of (permalink) Old 04-19-2017, 12:00 AM
Super Moderator
 
KARVITK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Abbotsford, B.C., Canada.
Interest: Hiking, Snowshoeing, and Photography. Enjoying the outdoors fresh air and fitness experience.
Posts: 17,903
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dlofting View Post
I've never been up Mt Harvey. Is the lee slope as shown in guntis' diagram, which looks to be about 45 degrees, or is it closer to vertical ?
The lee slope on the north side where the people fell, is 500 meters vertical from what I read, from a distance you can see the sheer immense high cliff face.

K

Hiking is what keeps you young of mind and heart. When the going gets tough, the tough get going..............
KARVITK is online now  
post #21 of (permalink) Old 04-19-2017, 10:14 AM
Headed for the Mountains
 
dlofting's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: North Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Posts: 258
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by KARVITK View Post
The lee slope on the north side where the people fell, is 500 meters vertical from what I read, from a distance you can see the sheer immense high cliff face.

K
Thanks
dlofting is offline  
post #22 of (permalink) Old 04-23-2017, 11:58 AM
Headed for the Mountains
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Coquitlam, BC, Canada.
Posts: 113
Default

There's a couple of nice photos showing just how steep it is here: https://stevensong.com/coastal-inter...mount-hanover/

Hopefully the author won't mind if I directly paste a couple of the photos here.
Attached Images
  
WildernessMan and StevenSong like this.
BlackPete is offline  
post #23 of (permalink) Old 04-24-2017, 01:22 PM
Hittin' the Trails
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: , , .
Posts: 3
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by guntis View Post
Yes, this would be best practice. Conservative approach, roped up. But realistically, Mt Harvey is traditionally a pretty safe destination.
There is no way a place where you can fall 500m down is a safe destination in the winter. Conservative for me, means I stay off such places till snow melt.
treetops is offline  
post #24 of (permalink) Old 04-24-2017, 04:10 PM
High on the Mountain Top
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Smurf Village, BC, Canada.
Interest: hiking, exploring, reading, random shiny things
Posts: 2,451
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by treetops View Post
There is no way a place where you can fall 500m down is a safe destination in the winter. Conservative for me, means I stay off such places till snow melt.
Perhaps low probability of environmentally caused catastrophe is more accurate. It's just semantics. Obviously there's higher risk in mountaineering than there is in walking the seawall.
guntis is offline  
post #25 of (permalink) Old 04-24-2017, 04:23 PM
Dru
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Climbing, a mountain, Canada.
Interest: climbing and spraying
Posts: 16,175
Default

I have climbed the north face like 5 times, and roped up for part of it once. I don't think anyone ever has roped up for the hiking trail.
Norgie likes this.
Dru is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome
 

Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.1