Watersprite via new trail - Page 2 - ClubTread Community

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post #16 of (permalink) Old 09-07-2016, 01:59 PM
Scaling New Heights
 
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Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada.
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Thanks for the reply Jungle Savage, and thanks for all your work in the area, it really has been a great addition to the Squamish Outdoor scene. FYI the trail would never get heavy mtn bike use, its too far out of the way, some may use it to cut down the travel time to the alpine but that is about it. As long as there is a food bed width of gravel on the logging roads it would be passable to bikes and the thought that any part of a logging road would suffer more due to bike use than foot use is simply not true. That being said you are right that if the connector between the roads isn't built at the right grade it probably isn't bikeable but depending on its length, im sure someone could always hike a bike up this portion.

Who did you connect with in the mtn bike community? I am making a donation to the BCMC for trail maintenance as we speak.

Cheers

Jeff

Quote:
Originally Posted by junglesavage View Post
Hello jjnorm,

The trail sign was erected by the MFLNRO (the Government). If the trail was also for mountain bikes, it would require greater maintenance and upgrades. For instance, we did not remove all of the alder stocks from all of the logging roads. If it were to be mountain bike friendly, we would need to cut those to ground level on a regular basis. This is hard on our chainsaws and brush cutters.
Secondly, there are a couple soft spots on the logging roads. Heavy mountain bike use would make this a serious challenge for us to maintain and a burden on our already pressed volunteer trail crew.
Lastly, we did not design the connector trail between the lower and upper logging roads with mountain bikes in mind, and it would not survive long.

The whole valley has soft ground, dynamic creeks and a large amount of rainfall. This is part of the reason trail building in this valley has been so difficult in the past to sustain longer-term access and has challenged trail builders for decades. In essence, it has taken decades to reach this point. This is why there is the phrase "Mamquam Bush" which describes the tenacity of this rugged wildness and the mighty "red alder" that rules in dominion over it.
As a side note, we approached the mountain bike community at the start of the project and asked if they would be willing to partner with us in the construction of the new trail in order to make it dual use. They declined at the time, and so we did not have the resources to make this happen on our own.

Cheers.
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post #17 of (permalink) Old 09-07-2016, 04:54 PM
Hittin' the Trails
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
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Thanks for the donation Jeff,

Myself and another BCMC member met with a SORCA BOD member and spoke at length about the entire Watersprite Project (not sure how many years ago now). SORCA already had its hands full at the time with a number of projects of their own (they run and are committed to multi-year plans) and also felt that the Watersprite Area was too far from Squamish.

As a side note, there are a few areas of the logging road system which I would describe as "liquifying". This means that the gravel roadbed has disappeared leaving only soft ground (i.e. muck). Fortunately, these areas a very contained and limited. I am still always in awe at just how much water is in this area and how green the valley is.
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post #18 of (permalink) Old 09-07-2016, 07:25 PM
Hittin' the Trails
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Burnaby
Interest: Hike
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Red face What kind of car can make it?

Hi All,
seems there are so many people who went to this great hike recently,

we are a group of 5 and we are planning to go there this saturday, could anybody tell me what kind of car do I need to go there? should it be a 4x4 or a sedan can make it as well?

if there is anyone who will go there this saturday it will be appreciated if we could company him/her
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post #19 of (permalink) Old 09-07-2016, 08:43 PM
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Unhappy Not suitable for a car

Quote:
Originally Posted by mahta_gh View Post
Hi All,
seems there are so many people who went to this great hike recently,

we are a group of 5 and we are planning to go there this saturday, could anybody tell me what kind of car do I need to go there? should it be a 4x4 or a sedan can make it as well?

if there is anyone who will go there this saturday it will be appreciated if we could company him/her
I have driven the road probably 30 times in the last 3 years in a variety of vehicles. There is one hill before the dam that is highly problematic for cars. On one trip, we helped a member of the public by hitching a tow strap from our truck to a Mini-van that could not get up the hill on the way back out. I believe the biggest danger is people being able to reach the trailhead in a car by pushing their vehicle, but find themselves unable to get out, especially on wet days. (the difficult hill must be Ascended on the way out).
Furthermore, if people with cars choose to drive the last 4 KM, there are undoubtedly going to be cases of lost mufflers, destroyed oil pans, etc.; possibly even full breakdowns.

Last edited by junglesavage; 09-07-2016 at 08:45 PM.
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post #20 of (permalink) Old 09-07-2016, 09:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by junglesavage View Post
I have driven the road probably 30 times in the last 3 years in a variety of vehicles. There is one hill before the dam that is highly problematic for cars. On one trip, we helped a member of the public by hitching a tow strap from our truck to a Mini-van that could not get up the hill on the way back out. I believe the biggest danger is people being able to reach the trailhead in a car by pushing their vehicle, but find themselves unable to get out, especially on wet days. (the difficult hill must be Ascended on the way out).
Furthermore, if people with cars choose to drive the last 4 KM, there are undoubtedly going to be cases of lost mufflers, destroyed oil pans, etc.; possibly even full breakdowns.
Thanks for the information
sounds like we are not going to watersprite anymore :P

but could you please tell me that is it possible to do the whole hike to the beautiful lake and back in one day?
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post #21 of (permalink) Old 09-10-2016, 12:25 PM
Luc
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Join Date: Jun 2015
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I was up on Thursday and had noticed one car parked a bit before the last hill up immediately prior to that last hill down. The road before that point is not in horrible shape. You would not need very high clearance if you were careful and know your car very well.

The lake and back in a day is quite doable for the average hiker. We took less than seven hours round trip and were moving slower than normal. That also included lunch and relaxing.
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post #22 of (permalink) Old 09-10-2016, 11:37 PM
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Join Date: May 2015
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I am still confused about the "new" trail. I went up Wednesday morning and after hiking up a logging road, 1.5 hours later, I came to a junction. There was a yellow arrow pointing left with lots of pink flagging. Was I supposed to turn left or continue straight on the logging road? Or was I on the "old" trail?

Any information will be very grateful.
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post #23 of (permalink) Old 09-11-2016, 01:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by catmobile68 View Post
I am still confused about the "new" trail. I went up Wednesday morning and after hiking up a logging road, 1.5 hours later, I came to a junction. There was a yellow arrow pointing left with lots of pink flagging. Was I supposed to turn left or continue straight on the logging road? Or was I on the "old" trail?

Any information will be very grateful.
I can help you (I purchased the arrows and nailed them up myself). There will be official signage, but we haven't got them printed yet.

The arrow is at the end of the lower road system at approximately the 1.5 KM mark. The arrow points to the connector trail through the second growth forest which is heavily marked by large reflective orange aluminum markers. There is no more road at that point (it is the end) so you must enter the forest using the connector trail (which is quite pleasant hiking and not too steep). After hiking 300-400 meters through the connecter trail, you will reach another old logging road known as the "S Line". There is another golden arrow there. From this point at the end of the connector trail, turn RIGHT to reach Watersprite Lake. If you accidentally go left, you are heading into the deep wilderness and towards the Mamquam Massif. We will be putting a sign there soon.
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post #24 of (permalink) Old 09-11-2016, 12:44 PM
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Thank for clarifying this trail. It all makes sense :-). And thank you for your work in redeveloping this trail. Truly, it must be a labour of love.
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