Hesquiat Peninsula Trail, a.k.a. Escalante Trail - Page 2 - ClubTread Community

User Tag List

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #16 of (permalink) Old 07-08-2008, 01:52 PM
Ed
Headed for the Mountains
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Burnaby, B.C., Canada.
Posts: 194
Default

I will be heading out for this one on August 5th so I hope to see your report as well.
Quote:
quote:Originally posted by wendy1355

Will do as soon as I figure out how!
Ed is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #17 of (permalink) Old 07-08-2008, 08:22 PM
Super Moderator
 
KARVITK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Abbotsford, B.C., Canada.
Interest: Hiking, Snowshoeing, and Photography. Enjoying the outdoors fresh air and fitness experience.
Posts: 17,919
Default

Quote:
quote:Originally posted by wendy1355

Will do as soon as I figure out how!
Wendy

Also looking forward to your report of your adventure. All you need to do is click on new topic under this forum. And then insert your pics using one of the icons..

K
KARVITK is offline  
post #18 of (permalink) Old 07-09-2008, 06:42 PM
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 2,615
Default

Damn straight Eddie - This one is gonna be fun! Watch for a new trip report soon CT'ers!
Hiking_nut is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #19 of (permalink) Old 07-10-2008, 09:43 AM
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14
Default

Here's some reading in the meantime! You will no doubt smell this - there's not much left to see.
Wendy


Drift whale on Hesquiaht Beach
by Dianne Ignace and Katie Beach, Tofino


Nearly every morning, Dave Ignace (Mushguy) walks the beaches near his home in Hesquiaht Harbour, keeping an eye out for the constant changes affecting his ancestors' traditional territories. He is used to finding things washed up on the beach, but on April 8, the tide brought in something very surprising. Mushguy discovered a 47 foot sperm whale on the flats on the west end of Hesquiaht Harbour. The whale was fairly fresh, an exciting gift from the sea. In the time of traditional Hesquiaht whalers, a fresh drift whale would have been a cause for celebration and feasting. However, with a waning interest in the consumption of whale, the find was instead a great opportunity for research purposes. Biologists from DFO Pacific Biological Station in Nanaimo were notified and arrangements made to do a necropsy in order to discover the cause of death. Whales do periodically wash up on the coast of British Columbia, but what caught everyone's attention this time was that sperm whales are not a common species to find in these waters. DFO's Marine Mammal Incident Coordinator Lisa Spaven explains that "Sperm whales are very deep diving animals and inhabit the waters just off the continental shelf. So when they do die, rarely do they make it all the way to shore". However, according to DFO, this animal was one of several sperm whales to have washed up along North America's coast in the past few months, and this is a mystery worth investigating. The uniqueness of this occurrence was another reason that the Ignace's were quick to report the carcass. "If it's a disease that killed the whale, we worry about the disease spreading to the scavengers of the carcass" said Dianne, noting that eagles have begun to feast on the whale, and wolves will be close behind.
On Saturday, April 12, 2008 a crew of biologists and technicians from DFO and NTC Fisheries came to Hesquiaht Harbour to obtain samples from the adult male whale for analysis. They were welcomed to Hesquiaht First Nations traditional territories by Felix Jackson, a councilor for the Nation. He reminded the visitors that they had been invited into Hesquiaht's homeland to collect important biological data, but to respect the whale and Hesquiaht First Nation's protocols. The crew did some initial measurements of the whale and then began the dirty job of cutting into the body. The necropsy took about six hours and involved cutting through the tough hide and thick blubber to access samples from the muscle and organs such as the heart, lungs, stomach, liver, etc. By the time that visitors from Tofino, Hotsprings, and elsewhere arrived at the scene, they found pools of blood and piles of blubber surrounding the biologists. Many commented on the smell of the giant mammal, but that didn't seem to deter the necropsy crew from crawling into the chest cavity to obtain the samples. By early evening the sampling was complete, and the crew returned to Tofino and Nanaimo to clean up, leaving the whale to decompose naturally.
The results of the necropsy and the precise identification of the cause of death are expected to take up to several months. In the meantime, visitors will be able to catch glimpses of the skeletal remains as it decomposes, but please leave it intact, as the remains belong to the Hesquiaht First Nations and the discoverers Dave and Dianne Ignace.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Dianne Ignace is a resident of Hesquiaht and Katie Beach is a biologist with Uu-a-thluk, the NTC Fisheries.





Still can't upload images-Help
wendy1355 is offline  
post #20 of (permalink) Old 07-10-2008, 02:10 PM
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14
Default

wendy1355 is offline  
post #21 of (permalink) Old 07-13-2008, 09:42 PM
Scaling New Heights
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: victoria, bc, Canada.
Posts: 54
Default

How much traffic does this trail/beach/whatever see per season? Is there a way to find out? Thanks.
Icanfly is offline  
post #22 of (permalink) Old 07-13-2008, 10:59 PM
Headed for the Mountains
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Nanaimo, BC, Canada.
Interest: Rock climbing, skiing, mountain biking, backpacking, and kayaking are my main hobbies. I\'ve spent a significant amount of time over the years scrubbing rock around Nanaimo.
Posts: 113
Default

Apparently only a "handful" per season according to the lightkeeper at Estevan. I would say around 10 groups per year maybe more. If you really wanted to find out you'd have to contact Peter Buckland of the Boat Basin foundation, he'd have a good idea.
It is a great hike.
ryanguy is offline  
post #23 of (permalink) Old 07-17-2008, 08:07 PM
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14
Default

Peter Buckland says that maybe 30-40 people do this annually.
wendy1355 is offline  
post #24 of (permalink) Old 07-17-2008, 09:54 PM
Scaling New Heights
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: victoria, bc, Canada.
Posts: 54
Default

Thanks you two, I got a more liberal answer of 50 to 100 from his assistants. Estaven says they see more and more people every year, so definately a growing destination. Might have to open up a burger stand
Wendy, looking forward to your trip report.
Icanfly is offline  
post #25 of (permalink) Old 07-22-2008, 06:44 PM
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14
Default



I don't think I can add much to the excellent log and other descriptions of this hike. The most important things are water supplies and footwear plus hiking poles. It would be nice if the wildlife there never gets a hint of our food so we should be diligent about stashes etc.

We weren't careful enough about taking advantage of low tide - really important for places like Billion Boulder Beach.

Enjoy!
wendy1355 is offline  
post #26 of (permalink) Old 07-31-2008, 10:24 AM
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 1
Default

Hey - I am about to head over to Hesquiat to hike it. Do I need to buy the topo maps or is it pretty straight forward without them? I would think so because it's all on the beach but I just want to make sure.
julie3buchanan is offline  
post #27 of (permalink) Old 08-04-2008, 04:20 PM
Hittin' the Trails
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Victoria, BC, Canada.
Posts: 12
Default

We have a group of 6 doing the Hesquiat Aug 10-15th. I've been going over some meals ideas and I'm thinking of trying to do some Bannock Bread. Has anyone ever tried the style over the fire?
Skidlidoo is offline  
post #28 of (permalink) Old 08-04-2008, 04:34 PM
vic
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 372
Default

I've done the WCT and NCT. I'll put this one on my list.
vic is offline  
post #29 of (permalink) Old 11-12-2008, 10:39 AM
Hittin' the Trails
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Port Coquitlam, BC, Canada.
Interest: hiking, scrambling, kayaking, canoing, MUSIC: bass, guitar, drums, piano, voice
Posts: 8
Default

Myself and 3 friends will be hitting up this route in early december. We plan to forge past Boat Basin and follow the old telegraph line to connect to Hot Springs Cove. ANyone ever been to Hot SPrings COve? I hear its a popular destination, but perhaps not so much in Dec. From there, hitching a ride back to Tofino via a regular tourist shuttling Water Taxi was one option, should the weather be rough I doubt many Water Taxis will be taking people there. Bringing satellite phone for this reason. Boat Planes are so damn expensive for round trip. Hot Springs is rad-awesome way to end a week long trekk!

Are there light house keepers year round at Escalante Point?
Any info on Hot Springs Cove welcomed.

.Timja.
nookum_cranny_PeakProphet is offline  
post #30 of (permalink) Old 11-13-2008, 09:41 AM
Off the Beaten Path
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: delta, bc, Canada.
Interest: This and That
Posts: 687
Default

There are lightkeepers year round.

Your plans are somewhat nebulous. Where are you beginning? You may know more than me but the old telegraph trail is mostly overgrown except in some sections and I heard difficult to find. Winter tides may make coast hiking problematic. Hope your research is in place. No regular water taxi service at that time of year. Would be private charter and suspect costly. Good luck.
haidabear is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome
 

Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.1