Logging in Grouse Mountain Regional "Park" - ClubTread Community

User Tag List

 4Likes
  • 3 Post By Dru
  • 1 Post By Jaaklucas
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of (permalink) Old 11-17-2019, 01:17 PM Thread Starter
Summit Master
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: NorthVan
Interest: I enjoy hiking
Posts: 2,944
Default Logging in Grouse Mountain Regional "Park"

Yesterday morning I found this near the bottom of the BCMC trail on Grouse. It happened sometime Thursday or Friday. You would think that being in a park, these healthy 100+ year old trees would be safe from being cut down!
Click image for larger version

Name:	grouse1.jpg
Views:	95
Size:	101.4 KB
ID:	272296

Over 100 rings!
Click image for larger version

Name:	grouse2.jpg
Views:	73
Size:	176.2 KB
ID:	272298
Click image for larger version

Name:	grouse3.jpg
Views:	95
Size:	146.6 KB
ID:	272300

Click image for larger version

Name:	grouse4.jpg
Views:	103
Size:	176.3 KB
ID:	272302

More trees are being prepared for cutting:
Click image for larger version

Name:	grouse5.jpg
Views:	96
Size:	182.7 KB
ID:	272306

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_0925.jpg
Views:	99
Size:	1.02 MB
ID:	272308

The vandals tried to hide their dirtywork:
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_0924.jpg
Views:	97
Size:	1.33 MB
ID:	272310

I'm writing a letter to Metro Vancouver to see what their explanation is.
martin is online now  
Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of (permalink) Old 11-18-2019, 01:23 PM
Summit Master
 
zeljkok's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Anywhere but social media
Posts: 4,851
Default

martin, let me make sure I understand: You are saying this is not some planned clearing by metro Van, but vandalism? It would have to be done during the night because area is busy during the day. Why in the world would someone want to do it?? It is lots of work & these people are generally lazy.
zeljkok is online now  
post #3 of (permalink) Old 11-18-2019, 05:23 PM Thread Starter
Summit Master
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: NorthVan
Interest: I enjoy hiking
Posts: 2,944
Default

I wasn't sure what was going on, since there were no notices posted. Usually when there is tree chopping going on they close the trail or warn users by sending out a message on the Grind email list.
So I emailed them and asked what's going on with the logging and got a reply,

Quote:
and tree cutting and girdling work you saw is aimed at improving the health of the forest. Strategic actions to achieve this were devised in careful collaboration with a professional arborist and signs will be going up on site shortly to explain the work to other park users. The goal of the work is to protect and enhance the ecological value of the forest by creating canopy gaps to promote an increase in biodiversity. Improving forest health is a goal of the park management plan which you can find here: http://www.metrovancouver.org/servic...ntPlan2018.pdf
Below is a further description of the work
Quote:
Biodiversity Tree Thinning Prescription

Goal: To protect and enhance the ecological value of the forest by creating canopy gaps to promote an increase in biodiversity.

Activity: Three small patches of trees have been targeted for strategic removal and modification to create canopy gaps. Some trees will be felled to create woody debris but most will be modified to create dead, standing wildlife trees away from trails. All three trial openings are located in areas that have little understory vegetation and low forest structural diversity. They are located strategically far enough away from adjacent trails to mitigate the risk of these wildlife trees being a future risk to park users. The species and sites selected were also chose to reduce the risk of windthrow in these areas.

Rationale: A forest health assessment for Grouse Mountain Regional Park found that lower elevation forests which regenerated after earlier logging, are not as healthy as they should be. These stands of second growth trees generally have low structural diversity and low levels of biodiversity which results from few canopy gaps and little light reaching the forest floor. Understory vegetation which provides food and cover for wildlife is typically less than 10% in this area, and consists of a low diversity of plant species. There are only small amounts of large woody debris on the forest floor in the area, but this provides essential breeding sites and travel corridors for small mammals, birds and amphibians. Simply by strategically creating openings in the canopy, we can help restore natural process which will enhance biodiversity and ecosystem function and will increase the forest’s resiliency to human use and the effects of climate change
I find it strange that you can improve a forest by chopping down healthy trees, but hey I didn't go to school for that and I'm no expert. I'm still not happy with this activity though.
martin is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of (permalink) Old 11-18-2019, 05:37 PM
Summit Master
 
zeljkok's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Anywhere but social media
Posts: 4,851
Default

That makes more sense. I do agree re chopping healthy trees, but hopefully they know what they are doing


Sometimes in Rockies they do controlled burns of forested slopes, with posted signs on Highway "Fire/smoke in the area, do not report". That always seemed odd but I didn't go to school for that kind of stuff either, so it's all probably good.
zeljkok is online now  
post #5 of (permalink) Old 11-18-2019, 10:28 PM
Summit Master
 
mick range's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Forest Gnome Cabin, , Canada.
Interest: Outdoor stuff...especially scrambling,trailrunning,mountain biking,kayaking,and hiking, and of course photography
Posts: 13,876
Default

From what I see there someone may very well not now what they are doing at all. Maybe they think they know what they are doing (?) Canopy gaps are better created by taking the lesser trees in a stand, normally, if possible, and keeping apex trees like Douglas firs over hemlocks, but not too many or the upper canopy can get too exposed. Mind you a lot of things that happen around there have made little sense over the years
mick range is offline  
post #6 of (permalink) Old 11-20-2019, 05:23 PM
Dru
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Climbing, a mountain, Canada.
Interest: climbing and spraying
Posts: 16,175
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by martin View Post
I find it strange that you can improve a forest by chopping down healthy trees,

Spacing and pruning is pretty basic forestry, with significant forest health benefits.

The forest on Grouse is second growth near the trail as I understand it.
Second growth forest often loses trees as it ages. As trees mature, they compete with each other for light and water. This competition is more intense, the closer together they are.

Old growth tends to have big trees far apart. Second growth has smaller trees closer together.

So, although they might be healthy now, they could still get outcompeted by neighbours over time as the forest ages towards climax seral stage.

Therefore, if you have a tight cluster of three healthy trees now, and you thin it by cutting down (hopefully the smallest) one of the three, not only do the remaining two grow more vigorously afterwards because they are competing less, but you essentially hasten what was already going to occur - number 3 was probably going to be outcompeted anyways and would die on its own in future.
Dru is offline  
post #7 of (permalink) Old 11-20-2019, 09:08 PM
Headed for the Mountains
 
russellcoffin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Vancouver
Posts: 230
Default

Very interesting. I get the idea behind having a healthier forest by allowing trees to reach the canopy easier. Never would have thought that we would purposely cut down 30" diameter trees for this though...
russellcoffin is offline  
post #8 of (permalink) Old 11-24-2019, 08:26 PM
Headed for the Mountains
 
tinman610's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: White Rock
Interest: Professional Rock Licker
Posts: 339
Default

Another example of people thinking that they know better than nature. How well did it work when we decided to stop all forest fires which created a more hazardous environment? I guess if thinning trees is good then lets go back to logging everything. Forests were able to grow on their for a couple hundred million years before people decided that they knew better.

if you're not hiking you should be skiing
tinman610 is offline  
post #9 of (permalink) Old 12-04-2019, 01:41 PM
Scaling New Heights
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Posts: 73
Default

Once the evolving course of an old growth forest has been interrupted by logging and second growth is planted it will have to be baby-sat to emulate hundreds of years of evolution I guess. Just recently I heard that only now they are realizing the importance of slide alder in the natural evolution of our mountain-side forests. That area of Grouse will never be commercially logged again but to get it to return to its natural state will take some stewardship. There is proper science there I think. Or I hope there is!
zeljkok likes this.

Last edited by Jaaklucas; 12-12-2019 at 02:57 PM.
Jaaklucas is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome
 

Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.1