Widgeon Creek in an inflatable kayak? - ClubTread Community

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post #1 of (permalink) Old 09-24-2014, 11:03 PM Thread Starter
Hittin' the Trails
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: , BC, Canada.
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Default Widgeon Creek in an inflatable kayak?

Hello,

It's my first post on Club Tread, which I've enjoyed browsing on a casual basis for a few years.

I am not an athlete or a real outdoorsman, though I do love cycling every summer. I am wondering what my chances are of crossing from the boat-launch area on Pitt Lake and going up to the Widgeon Creek campsite area in an inflatable kayak. Does anyone think this is do-able? Also, I don't have an inflatable kayak yet, and money is limited. It is almost certain that I will have to wait to buy one until next summer.

Anyway, can I get away with buying a cheap one? Make and model recommendations are most welcome! My primary purpose in buying an inflatable kayak is for this specific trip.

Thanks in advance for any recommendations.
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post #2 of (permalink) Old 09-24-2014, 11:38 PM
Headed for the Mountains
 
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Did it in an inflatable Intex Explorer K2 in early September with no issues. I'd definitely carry a patch kit and pump always.

The morning crossing of Pitt Lake was very easy but coming back on a Sunday afternoon with some wind and fast boaters made it a little more interesting.

*Edit - Watch the tides as well. We were able to paddle up during high tide. On our way back during a lower tide we had to get out and walk through some very shallow sections of Widgeon Creek.
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post #3 of (permalink) Old 09-25-2014, 03:24 PM
Headed for the Mountains
 
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I have an Advanced Elements inflatable kayak. I go paddling up Widgeon Creek all the time with no problems.

As mentioned, the only thing to watch out for is low tide, and you find yourself having to get out to pull (or carry) your kayak over the shallow area. Bring sandals as walking barefeet on the pebbly riverbed gets uncomfortable.

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post #4 of (permalink) Old 09-25-2014, 07:32 PM Thread Starter
Hittin' the Trails
 
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Thank you, cutthroat22 and BlackPete!

These are encouraging responses, because I won't have much money to spend on an inflatable kayak.

I have two further questions: (1) could I carry a one-man tent and camping gear for a one or two-night stay in the kayaks you took? There's a $200 Advanced Elements kayak on Amazon.ca that looks as though there would be no room for anything other than a body. The Intex Explorer K2 looks roomier that way. (2) What time is best to go to take advantage of the tide? It sounds like morning is best, in the summer. Also how difficult is it to come back in the high tide time? My thanks in advance to you and/or anyone else who can help me with these questions.
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post #5 of (permalink) Old 09-25-2014, 08:15 PM
High on the Mountain Top
 
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We went up there in one of these:
http://www.sevylor.com/Tahiti-Classi...-P1813C41.aspx

Hard to beat the price. It's really more of a canoe than a kayak though.

Making the crossing during a rapid tide change can be a little tricky in a boat like this - especially if you only have one paddler and you are trying to get home while the tide is rapidly going out.

Widgeon Creek itself is best traveled during a high tide to avoid needing to get out and walk.
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post #6 of (permalink) Old 09-25-2014, 08:21 PM
Headed for the Mountains
 
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I have both the regular and Expedition models of the Advanced Elements kayaks. The regular one is just large enough to fit my backpack just behind the seat inside the kayak. The expedition model is longer and has more storage space so you could likely store a tent, sleeping bag, etc.

But yes, if it's storage you're looking for in a kayak, it's pretty hard to beat a hard shell.
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post #7 of (permalink) Old 02-19-2015, 10:13 PM
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I have an Aire Tomcat solo...the smallest inflatable available. check their website as they have many sizes and models.

http://www.aire.com/aire/products/default.aspx?id=210


Aire is one of the best raft/infatable kayak makers in the usa...factory located in boise idaho... customer service is awesome ... I just went there and they helped me pick and choose what I really needed in a repair kit.

These kayaks are made for river running and are some of the best on the market.... it's the wee details that count ! I paddled mine on a lake as well and was impressed with how well it tracked.

self bailing has lashpoints all along the sides.

I'll be able to fit about three to 5 days worth of stuff in that space. ( my fear is small and light)

in the front is a recess for your heels plus I bought a thigh strap for extra maneuverability. you can also buy a foot block or make one but I didn't find it neccessary.

it is a double hull system... sort of like inner tube and tire. and you fix a puncture in a similar way. You can even buy spare inner tubes....although the outer shell is pretty hard and you'd have to run into some nasty stuff to do damage.

Inflates in under 10 minutes with a foot pump.... deflates easily and most importantly dries quickly.. Unlike the enclosed advanced elements which my buddy said is a pain in the butt to get dry.

The other inflatable kayak that was reccomended was the top eagle brand model... but it's more expensive, has a single hull.

I picked up my tomcat on craigslist. and saw several other offers for a full kit ( helmet, life jacket paddle etc ) for $ 500... mostly down portland and seattle. good paddles are expensive.

happy paddling!

Last edited by lofty; 02-19-2015 at 10:20 PM.
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post #8 of (permalink) Old 02-24-2015, 09:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NathanB View Post
. (2) What time is best to go to take advantage of the tide? It sounds like morning is best, in the summer.
You need to consult a tide table to know when it would be best to go. You probably wouldn't want to be crossing from mid-morning to mid-day in the summer when it's the busiest with motorized boats or when the tide is moving rapidly. We actually prefer to explore there early spring or late fall when most of the motor boats are gone and its quieter.

Cheers!


"Smile, it is the key that fits the lock to everybody's heart."
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