Overnight camping on Twin Islands - ClubTread Community

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post #1 of (permalink) Old 05-29-2012, 12:03 AM Thread Starter
Scaling New Heights
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
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Default Overnight camping on Twin Islands

Hi,
I have a question about overnight camping on Twin Island in Indian Arm. I went there last Thursday and had a great time (I was alone on the island almost all the time) except for one small thing. I had chosen to stay at the campsite facing west,i.e. the one which is farthest from the dock and arrived at about 8PM when the tide was already quite high.
I pulled the kayak out of the water about 1 meter above the water - it was quite a job since the kayak (12.5ft 23Kg) was loaded for 3 nights (additional 17-22kg).I was lucky since I had a long towing rope (about 25 meters), so I had to tie the bow to the tree and lift the stern, after that tie the stern to the tree and lift up the bow and so one - the rope was a great help because the kayak was extremely unstable on those rocks.

Over the time I had to move the kayak higher again since the water was coming very fast

after that - again and eventually I ended up having it almost on the island - the picture was taken next morning - only then I realized how high I had to drug the heavy kayak:


So, this was the main challenge. In the morning I had to do the same work in reverse order to put the kayak in the water. When I had inspected the kayak later, of course, I found a lot of deep scratches and cuts - I don't know what would I do if I had a fiberglass or a Kevlar kayak but one thing is very certain - I would want to avoid drugging those types of kayaks over sharp rocks.

So, now is my question: what is the easiest way for a solo kayaker to secure his kayak for overnight staying in similar conditions (high and steep banks, lack of help, necessity to move it up to 2m above the water line, high depth close to the shore and as a result almost impossible to unload the kayak in the water etc)? I must admit I was quite tired after pulling the kayak out of the water and even had some real back pain - it would be nice to avoid all those things.

Other than that everything was merely perfect. Here is some pictures:
a)almost ready for the night:



b) 5.30 AM - a local crow has stolen the plastic bag shown on the picture ("made in nature") and started hammering it with its beak. BTW, the bag was hidden under the rainfly but it did not stop the clever bird. It contained a long piece of back paracord, therefore as soon as the crow made a whole in the plastic and pulled out first 2 inches of the paracord, the bird began to make a lot of noise probably believing that it is going to get the longest black worm in its live. I tried to ignore the crow for some time but it became clear very soon that I better wake up since it was not going to stop by itself.


All in all - very nice place to stay for a night!
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post #2 of (permalink) Old 05-29-2012, 12:18 AM
High on the Mountain Top
 
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unload it...
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post #3 of (permalink) Old 05-29-2012, 12:20 AM
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Bishop Creek or Granite Falls campgrounds are better choices for camping and not much further. Both have gravel beaches so unloading and hauling are easier.

I try to avoid camp spots like the one you described. When forced to, I unload the boats then carry them above the tidemark. Sometimes that means standing around in freezing water up to your waist at night, in the rain to unload everything.

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post #4 of (permalink) Old 05-29-2012, 09:05 AM
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Sometimes the best place to pull your kayak out is not right by the camp site. However it's far easier to find a good spot to unload and store the boat, then make a few portage trips to the camp site. I never sleep well unless I am quite sure that the boat is safe!
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post #5 of (permalink) Old 05-29-2012, 10:00 AM
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Always unload your boat. And try to find a better spot to unlad your gear even if it means a further distance carrying your gear to camp. It's better than damaging your boat or back.
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post #6 of (permalink) Old 05-29-2012, 01:37 PM
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As Smac said...
If you have a ugly shore line then you are left with pulling all your gear out. Then pulling your kayak out and placing it well above high tide line. A number of tricks exist one is where you place large round pool noodles under the hull. Then pull the kayak on shore and the noodles roll till your out of the surf zone.

Personally I'm confused why you wouldn't have used the dock. Beyond the distance is further to that one tent pad. But normally most people just stack all the kayaks up on the dock.
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post #7 of (permalink) Old 05-29-2012, 03:07 PM
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Looks like quite an adventure! Really all you could do has most likely already been mentioned aside from possibly putting something like wood or a jacket or what ever you may have on hand under your boat while trying to move it. Sometimes it takes a bit of hard work to get away from the masses, esp in the Vancouver area! Happy future paddling!
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post #8 of (permalink) Old 05-29-2012, 05:20 PM
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This is only feasible with low wind or wave action and a suitable bottom configuration, but can work out very well indeed when conditions are right.
Find a large rock, as heavy as you can comfortably lift and not so rounded you can't secure a rope to it. Use the rock as an anchor from one end of the kayak, another rope from the shore to the other end of the kayak. Get a little clever with a third rope and you can draw the kayak out far enough from the shore that it won't touch anything but just float there.
Same concept can would work well in the little cove in your pictures above, from one point to the other.

When that trick won't work then the suggestions above, especially the bit about unloading it. (Dumb-ass with a sore back!)
Oops, sorry, did I type that out loud?

Find round sticks to act as rollers, or flat slippery ones to slide it on. That may not work with the rocks you had to deal with there.
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post #9 of (permalink) Old 05-29-2012, 07:20 PM
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Alex was this ment that unloading it was dumb-ass or not unloading it was dumb-ass ?

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quote:Originally posted by alexcanuck

When that trick won't work then the suggestions above, especially the bit about unloading it. (Dumb-ass with a sore back!)
Oops, sorry, did I type that out loud?
This idea works but as you indicated alex low wind or wave action and a suitable bottom configuration play a huge factor. And if you judge the tide or weather wrong in the middle of the night your SOL.
But overall I'm not going to risk my 3-5k kevlar kayak on some rock anchor set up. As for me personally my kayak is my life line. If it gets damaged or floats aways i'm in serious trouble.



Quote:
quote:Originally posted by alexcanuck

This is only feasible with low wind or wave action and a suitable bottom configuration, but can work out very well indeed when conditions are right.
Find a large rock, as heavy as you can comfortably lift and not so rounded you can't secure a rope to it. Use the rock as an anchor from one end of the kayak, another rope from the shore to the other end of the kayak. Get a little clever with a third rope and you can draw the kayak out far enough from the shore that it won't touch anything but just float there.
Same concept can would work well in the little cove in your pictures above, from one point to the other.
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