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post #1 of (permalink) Old 04-21-2014, 06:18 PM Thread Starter
High on the Mountain Top
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Qualicum Beach, BC, Canada.
Interest: general mountaineering/ hiking/ backpacking/ skiing/ kayaking
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Default BakePacker

I recently came by this interesting method of baking bread stuffs over a backpacker stove. It's a way of making biscuits, muffins and other bread stuffs on top of a regular white gas, or LP gas, or even wood fire heat source.

Has anybody tried this Bake-Packer device yet? Does it work as advertised?

www.bakepacker.com
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post #2 of (permalink) Old 04-21-2014, 07:45 PM
Hittin' the Trails
 
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I have never used it but wanted to try it. U can not buy it in Canada. I asked at MEC. They never heard of it. REI does not carry it. Only online thru a few vendors. The "Lip Smacking Backpacking" cookbook makes reference to it and there a few videos on utube. Basically the steam bakes your product in plastic bag. Gotta wander on the health hazards. It does look cool. I Was thinking of gettin one out of shear curiosity.

I do own the outback oven and it is osom, but this is lighter and less bulky ,, but is limited. The outback oven is hard to beat.<div align="left"></div id="left">
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post #3 of (permalink) Old 04-21-2014, 10:44 PM
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I remember reading a thread on CT once about steam-baking using silicon cups and something (like an inverted plate) to keep them off the bottom of the pot. It sounded promising, but I've never tried it.

Something I'd like to try sometime is baking pita while camping (either on a wood stove or camp fire) since you can mix everything at home and then just add water at camp.
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post #4 of (permalink) Old 04-22-2014, 03:20 PM
Hittin' the Trails
 
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post #5 of (permalink) Old 04-22-2014, 06:37 PM Thread Starter
High on the Mountain Top
 
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So, I watched a bunch of the videos and it looks like you could even invert a tin foil pie plate and use it to keep whatever you're baking off the bottom of the pan. I guess the water is used to self regulate the temperature of the “oven”. As long as there's water boiling and it doesn't totally evaporate off, the temperature stays even.

mikeilic, I too wonder about using plastic bags to cook the dough in. I take it that there are food safe plastic bags that won't melt. Does anybody have any info on these?

What a hassle free way to make bread stuffs, if you can have the food material in a plastic bag, add water & mix, then cook in a pot with some kind of light weight rack to keep it off the bottom of the pot, then serve and have NO clean up!

mad owl woman, what are your thoughts on pita bread? So would you hand flatten the dough to make your pita, like a chaptti, or a tortilla? and then cook it on a heated rock, or in a pan, or something else?

I see that I have homework to do on this subject and experiments to undertake. Will share my wins and fails.

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post #6 of (permalink) Old 04-22-2014, 06:39 PM
Dru
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Outback Oven has been letting you bake on a camp stove for ~20 years.

http://www.mec.ca/product/4000-241/outback-oven-10/
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post #7 of (permalink) Old 04-22-2014, 07:26 PM Thread Starter
High on the Mountain Top
 
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Dru,

I get that the Outback Oven has been out for many years, but it's bulky and weighty, compared to the "bakepacker" style of bread making. In all of my mountaineering trips, I have never seen anyone with an Outback Oven. Have you? They have always been regulated to canoe and kayak trips, where bulk & weight isn't as much a big deal.

What a great tent bound trick it would be, to come up with hot steamy bread... and on simple lightweight mountaineering gear.

Maybe someone could come up with an external heat exchanger for winter cooking pots and make it double as a "bake-packer" style insert to cook bread stuffs. OK folks, you heard it here, first, on Club Tread!
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post #8 of (permalink) Old 04-22-2014, 08:02 PM
High on the Mountain Top
 
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Before the true mountain grammar police get you... That would be relegated to canoe trips, no laws involved.

Secondly, and much more importantly: It's called bannock, can be wonderful, can be sweet, can be savoury, needs no oven.
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post #9 of (permalink) Old 04-22-2014, 09:40 PM
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Hmm, I'd probably improvise a rolling pin, maybe a nalgene bottle? They bake quickly so either a pan or hot rocks *should* work. It's been awhile since I've made pita but I remember thinking it was probably the easiest yeast bread, and readily converts to sandwiches [8D]
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post #10 of (permalink) Old 04-23-2014, 08:46 AM
Dru
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Outback Ovens weigh what, 900 grams?

Look: pizza on the first day of a 7 day hike.

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post #11 of (permalink) Old 04-23-2014, 08:56 PM Thread Starter
High on the Mountain Top
 
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Outback oven 900 gms, including the huge, bulky frying pan, or is this an extra?

Large 7 3/8 inch dia bakepacker = 228 gms.

Small 5 3/4 inch dia bakepacker = 114 gms, which would fit into my largest pot.

Who's going to carry a 900 gm bulky oven, when you can carry a 114 gm unit that fits into your normal cook pot?

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post #12 of (permalink) Old 04-23-2014, 11:31 PM
Hittin' the Trails
 
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In regards to the outback oven. I have the large model, which comes with a 10 non stick pan. and yes i do only use it on kayak / canoe trips, and the occasional overnighter. -

but the small outback oven weighs less than a pound, it is a 7 inch oven designed to be used with exisitng cook ware, ideally non stick,,, or u using parchment paper.

I am a firm believing in the outback oven. But you have prompted my curiosity on this. I am going to order one this week. I will let you know how well it works. for 20 dollars the curiosity is killing me.

I will keep u posted.

I think the the foodsaver vacuum packer bags are food safe as they are designed to be put in boiling water to heat your food.
I am sure they would do the job.

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post #13 of (permalink) Old 04-24-2014, 07:25 AM Thread Starter
High on the Mountain Top
 
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mikeilic,

I think you have to order the bakepacker from the states. I'd really like to know how you make out with ordering and then using the thing.

The foodsaver plastic bags. Can they be reused? Can you cut off the sealed end and make a shorter bag?

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post #14 of (permalink) Old 04-24-2014, 09:26 AM
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MOW - on my backpacking trips, my foodie friends make pita bread in a non-stick fry pan over a stove. Works like a charm. Also good for tortillas, pizza with real homemade dough, and pancakes.

The boil water with a floating cup method works like a charm. Try it at home on your stove and you'll be surprised at how easy and fast it is. Plus you end up with a pot of warm water for cleaning or a warm drink, etc.
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post #15 of (permalink) Old 04-24-2014, 08:02 PM
Scaling New Heights
 
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Regarding "bag" cooking, I started doing that around 1990. I don't use anything fancy, just my regular cook pot and lid. I put some water in the pot and then a few rocks large enough so the water doesn't cover them. I set the plastic bag with the baking mix, water added, on top of the rocks (off of direct heat which might burn)and put a lid on. It works just fine for me. Sometimes I just immerse the sealed bag into a pot of boiling water and simmer until the cake or whatever is done. I especially like to use spice cake mix with added pecans and raisins. It needs no icing, as it is dumped out of the bag and eaten hot---yummy! Biscuit mix works well too. Items turn out a little denser than if they were baked, but no extra weight from special ovens is fine with me.
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