Mushroom Season - Page 2 - ClubTread Community

User Tag List

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #16 of (permalink) Old 10-23-2013, 07:55 AM
Summit Master
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: , , Canada.
Interest: Hiking, hunting, fishing, and many others.
Posts: 3,951
Default

[quote]quote:Originally posted by Wildman

Quote:
quote:Originally posted by xj6response

Quote:
Originally posted by Wildman



Very strange mushroom.

what an amazing haul of mushrooms!

that last one, if it's not a chunk of wasp honeycomb, looks like a hexagonia. I've never seen one here, where did you find it?
I was just kidding with this one it is a bees nest.
Wildman is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #17 of (permalink) Old 10-23-2013, 08:01 AM
High on the Mountain Top
 
xj6response's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Sunshine Coast, BC, Canada.
Posts: 2,159
Default

[quote]quote:Originally posted by Wildman

Quote:
quote:Originally posted by Wildman

Quote:
quote:Originally posted by xj6response

Quote:
Originally posted by Wildman



Very strange mushroom.

what an amazing haul of mushrooms!

that last one, if it's not a chunk of wasp honeycomb, looks like a hexagonia. I've never seen one here, where did you find it?
I was just kidding with this one it is a bees nest.
Yeah, that's what I thought

which is why I said, it actually looks like a chunk of wasp or hornet comb. There are hexagonia fungi that look like that but I've only ever seen them in places like mexico
xj6response is offline  
post #18 of (permalink) Old 10-23-2013, 08:11 AM
High on the Mountain Top
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: , , Canada.
Posts: 1,193
Default


Very strange mushroom.



A very long time ago I discovered that although hypothetically they have an annual lifecycle with all the wasps except the new queens dying off in the fall, in a mild coastal climate if a 7 year old finds a big nest in February and brings it to show and tell, once the nest warms up there may be a few live wasps left inside. [:0]
They seem pissed off to have their doze toward death interrupted. (Although wasps in general seem to be constantly in a state of seething barely suppressed rage, so not much different than those buzzing around my second grade class.) Entertaining in the classroom to say the least!

I was off to the principal's office yet again to be told to just think what a normal kid would do before I bring any more wildlife surprises to show and tell.
alexcanuck is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #19 of (permalink) Old 11-01-2013, 10:25 PM Thread Starter
High on the Mountain Top
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Qualicum Beach, BC, Canada.
Interest: general mountaineering/ hiking/ backpacking/ skiing/ kayaking
Posts: 1,704
Default

Quote:
quote:Originally posted by solo75

There are lots of pine mushrooms in Strathcona Park in the Buttle Lake area this year. This year is a bumper crop due to the weather...lots of rain initially then warm weather. When I'm hiking, I sometimes see clusters of 10 together but unfortunately picking is illegal in provincial parks so I have to be content with just photographing them.
I was kind of suprised at your post, that all mushroom picking is banned in ALL BC Provincial parks. I somehow assumed that non-commercial mushroom picking would be akin to fresh water sports fishing, or hunting & trapping, which are allowed in many Provincial Park areas, including Strathcona Park, but you're right.

After doing a bit of internet research, I can gather why BC Parks might be a bit relunctant to allow any mushroom picking in Parks and I somewhat agree. Looking at youtube and other posts, there seems to be more than a few slobs that go commercial mushroom picking and leave a huge amount of garbage behind. I realize that I have just put a lightening rod on my head, for all of the “good” commercial pickers to zap. That's not my desire and I won't buy into that discussion.

I would however like to bring up the BC Parks policies and how they are made. Who exactly vetts the proposals and who puts them in to law?

My take is that it is, from the top down... the Premier, Minister of Environment, Senior Parks Staff and then a nod to public input.

For example, in the recent case of allowing horses into the Bedwell Valley in Strathcona Park, the public was probably well more than 90% against, the Strathcona Park Public Advisory Group was 100% against, with the Federation of Mountain Clubs and the Alpine Club of Canada supporting them.

The BC Minister of Environment ignored the public and ruled in favour of the corporate interest that wanted their horses in the Park.

So to restate my question, how does park policy get made, who makes it and how does it become law?

prother is offline  
post #20 of (permalink) Old 11-02-2013, 12:36 PM
High on the Mountain Top
 
xj6response's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Sunshine Coast, BC, Canada.
Posts: 2,159
Default

exploring area around Whistler this week and stumbled upon this beauty. A vibrant, fresh specimen of what I do think is Amanita Ocreata, the Destroying Angel. One delicious bite and an excruciating death from organ failure occurs within a few days. No antidote, no cure .... horrible way to go. This sample still had portions of the 'veil' attached at the base, but dislodged when I yanked it our of the ground


xj6response is offline  
post #21 of (permalink) Old 11-02-2013, 02:49 PM
High on the Mountain Top
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Fraser Valley
Interest: Photography, Nature Observation, Health & Fitness, Nutrition, Shinrin-yoku
Posts: 1,656
Default

Quote:
quote:Originally posted by prother

For example, in the recent case of allowing horses into the Bedwell Valley in Strathcona Park, the public was probably well more than 90% against, the Strathcona Park Public Advisory Group was 100% against, with the Federation of Mountain Clubs and the Alpine Club of Canada supporting them.

The BC Minister of Environment ignored the public and ruled in favour of the corporate interest that wanted their horses in the Park.

So to restate my question, how does park policy get made, who makes it and how does it become law?

I would assume it is the The Lieutenant Governor in Council as he/she has the power to establish a park and therefore set the policies..http://www.bclaws.ca/EPLibraries/bcl..._01#section4.1

There is an interesting link provided by the FOSP which directs to the Minister of the Environment decision to grant PUP permit. I find this statement interesting:
" When section 9(2) is read within the context of the Act as a whole, in light of other provisions in the Act such as sections 16 and 9.1, and consistently with the other subsections in section 9, it allows for the disturbance of natural resources provided that the Minister is of the opinion that the disturbance of the natural resources is necessary for the preservation of a recreational value in the Park. Here horseback riding and hiking are both accepted in the Master Plan as recreational values for Strathcona Park. The Minister concluded that issuing the PUP was in the best interest of the Park. He should not be second guessed"
solo75 is offline  
post #22 of (permalink) Old 11-02-2013, 06:48 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Calgary, Alberta, Andorra.
Interest: hiking, backpacking, scrambling, climbing
Posts: 4,439
Default

Hey, all you knowledgeable mushroom people..
Can anyone recommend for me a good book for identifying Rocky Mountain mushrooms?
Rachelo is offline  
post #23 of (permalink) Old 11-02-2013, 08:24 PM
High on the Mountain Top
 
xj6response's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Sunshine Coast, BC, Canada.
Posts: 2,159
Default

Quote:
quote:Originally posted by Rachelo

Hey, all you knowledgeable mushroom people..
Can anyone recommend for me a good book for identifying Rocky Mountain mushrooms?
"All that the rain promises and more" David Arora.

It's a decent little handbook. Somewhat coastal in focus, but most of the species are ubiquitous to the spruce-pine ecosystems of the Rockies.
xj6response is offline  
post #24 of (permalink) Old 11-02-2013, 08:28 PM
High on the Mountain Top
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Fraser Valley
Interest: Photography, Nature Observation, Health & Fitness, Nutrition, Shinrin-yoku
Posts: 1,656
Default

Quote:
quote:Originally posted by Rachelo

Hey, all you knowledgeable mushroom people..
Can anyone recommend for me a good book for identifying Rocky Mountain mushrooms?
It's hard to find one specifically for Rocky Mtns but here are some:
http://www.fungi.com/product-detail/...eld-guide.html
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/AS...ptainmaxmushro
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/AS...ptainmaxmushro
I don't have any experience with these guides but I do like Petersen's field guide books.
solo75 is offline  
post #25 of (permalink) Old 11-03-2013, 05:06 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Calgary, Alberta, Andorra.
Interest: hiking, backpacking, scrambling, climbing
Posts: 4,439
Default

Thanks, I'll have a look for those.

I tend to want to find books specific to the Canadian Rockies, because books written for broader regions tend to have a lot of extra species, leading to uncertainty as to whether I have the correct species, or some variant that doesn't even exist here.
Rachelo is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome
 

Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.1