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post #31 of (permalink) Old 10-18-2011, 11:15 PM
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by peter1955

As a backpacking or even a hostel meal (where you don't want to have too many dishes to wash) I'll just boil some water and add it to two or three packages of instant quaker oats, plus a large handful of trail mix. Lightweight, very filling, and you can pick what you're putting in your trailmix.
x2, I usually add a handful of trailmix, and broken up bits of chocolate. Yum.
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post #32 of (permalink) Old 10-19-2011, 03:58 PM
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by Dru

Quote:
quote:Originally posted by Ryan Conroy

It is almost all carbohydrates, and while very light, contains few calories (energy).
C'mon Ryan, this is hooey, or at least misleading. The complex carbohydrates in oatmeal are all long-chain starches meaning it has a very low glycemic index and gives a nice long energy release, over hours instead of minutes. Also, your suggestion to slow cook it to release the minerals will also degrade the vitamins to uselessness.
Fat = more energy per gram
Fibre = no energy per gram (useless bulk other than producing poop, excessive focus on fibre is only necessary because people eat too much simple carbs and are trying to correct the result of this)

Wouldn't temperature be the key determining factor in loss of heat sensitive vitamins, not time? In that case low temperature cooking of steel cut oats should degrade them less than faster boiling of flakes, especially given that they are still at least partly protected by their husk.

Phytic acid, if not properly neutralised, is an anti-nutrient that binds to minerals in your stomach and pulls them out of the body aside from the fact the minerals from the oats are going out with it. Even the American Grain Millers Association make mention of this on their website, although of course their solution is to try to genetically engineer some franken-oats. Where oats were eaten traditionally they were generally cooked and then stored at room temperature fermenting for weeks, not boiled as instant flakes. This is purely the practice of a sick, fat culture - well intentioned as it may be.
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post #33 of (permalink) Old 10-19-2011, 04:02 PM
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by Dru

Quote:
quote:Originally posted by Ryan Conroy

It is almost all carbohydrates, and while very light, contains few calories (energy).
C'mon Ryan, this is hooey, or at least misleading. The complex carbohydrates in oatmeal are all long-chain starches meaning it has a very low glycemic index and gives a nice long energy release, over hours instead of minutes. Also, your suggestion to slow cook it to release the minerals will also degrade the vitamins to uselessness.
Bringing up the glycemic index when I am talking about adding healthy fats to increase energy content is totally irrelevant. Fat is a better long term energy source than carbs, and does not have - nor need- a glycemic index.
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post #34 of (permalink) Old 10-19-2011, 04:15 PM
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[/quote]
This one sounds good for days when I want to cheat and add on some tasty fat choices. So let me get this right, you spoon a couple of Tbsp of the mixture into a fry pan and fry it like a pancake? let me know
[/quote]

I never get it to the consistency of a pancake, just a bit more texture.

The fat choices are for health benefits, not cheating.

Coconut fat is extremely healthy and one of the best sources of lauric acid. It has very strong anti-microbial and anti-bacterial properties (aside from numerous other health benefits) which can be particularly helpful while backpacking.

Grass fed butter contains a complex spectrum of healthy fatty acids, including odd chain staturated fatty acids such as CLA. It is also one of the better sources of vitamin D, and cholesterol. Cholesterol is important for brain function, cellular repair, and the body uses it to synthesise vitamin D it is a nutrient not a health hazard.

Our society's whole perspective on fats is based on 'The Lipid Hypothesis' which is a total fraud where the processed food manufacturers blamed health effects caused by the introduction of their processed trans fat products on saturated fats. At the time trans fats were not measured in foods, and because trans fatty acids - although typically polyunsaturated - have a similar profile to long chain saturated fatty acids, the margarine companies were able to shift the blame by saying that it was the small amount of saturated fat causing the problem, not the polyunsaturated fats. The only truth to that is some of the few saturated fatty acids that do seem to have a harmful effect on the body are the ones contained in their products.

The real enemy when it comes to fats are obviously trans fats, and rancid or oxidised polyunsaturated fats. Polyunsaturated oils are unstable and oxidise easily with a few exceptions like sesame oil (because it contains the anti oxidant sesamin). Three quarters of arterial plaque consists of polyunsaturated fats.
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post #35 of (permalink) Old 10-19-2011, 08:52 PM
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Definately a morning meal. Done like Hagus except no hemp seeds just hemp and sheeps fat for that appitite suppressing quality. Washed down with tea and whiskey. Keeps you moving like a flea on a dogs belly.
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post #36 of (permalink) Old 10-28-2011, 04:31 PM
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I LIKE THE FLAVOR OF OATMEAL...I GUESS I AM THE ODD WOMAN OUT....
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post #37 of (permalink) Old 10-29-2011, 06:51 PM
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I skip the oatmeal and have bacon and eggs.
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post #38 of (permalink) Old 10-29-2011, 07:07 PM
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by tedoliver

I skip the oatmeal and have bacon and eggs.
I like the bacon and eggs too, but a morning without oatmeal makes me feel I am missing something. Day needs to begin with oatmeal in order for the day to start right.

K
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post #39 of (permalink) Old 10-30-2011, 12:19 AM
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I don't often eat it at home, but on the trail, I do oatmeal so it can be a really quick easy bag breakfast, and am not willing to spend the time to cook it.
I use quick oats, flax seed, ground flax, almond flakes, unsweetened coconut flakes, and raisins, plus some milk powder, to which i add cinnamon, nutmeg, and a little brown sugar. It's awesome.
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post #40 of (permalink) Old 10-30-2011, 07:33 AM
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by tu

To 1lb oatmeal, add:

8lbs malt
1lb barley
2oz hops
1-2 packages of yeast

Cooking directions vary and is typically lengthy, but makes for a hearty breakfast.
For extra nutrition, distill after fermentation.
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post #41 of (permalink) Old 10-30-2011, 10:48 AM
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Those nature valley bars are great for the trail; Oats and Honey is a good one; like the chocolate chip better though.

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post #42 of (permalink) Old 10-30-2011, 11:33 AM
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Try garlic powder, cayenne and soy sauce...on basmati rice. Much tastier than oatmeal.
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post #43 of (permalink) Old 10-30-2011, 08:32 PM
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I get my oats through homemade granola. A bowl of this stuff keeps me going all morning (4 hours). If it is cold outside I will add boiling water to heat it up- otherwise I eat it with cold water. It is one of my staples at home and on the trail.

recipe:
6 cups rolled oats, 2 cups kamut flakes, 1/2 cup almonds(sliced), 1/2 cup walnut bits,1/2 cup sesame seeds, 1/2 cup pumpkin seeds, 1/2 cup sunflower seeds, 1 cup of ground flax, 1/4 cup of pure maple syrup, 1 cup cranberries, 3 tsp cinnamon, 1-3 tsp vanilla extract

Mix everything except flax, cranberries and kamut and bake at 300 for 40 min and then add kamut, flax and cranberries and store in an airtight container.

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post #44 of (permalink) Old 01-13-2012, 03:50 PM
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Based on a unbaked cookie recipe, I had an idea to combine nuts, seeds and dates with quick oats...turned out to be the best oatmeal I've ever had, and have had lots of others say the same after trying it.

I take an assortment of nuts, like cashews, almonds and walnuts, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, flax, whatever you want, and grind them all up in a food processor until they're about the same size of the oatmeal flakes. Then I grind up dates with some of the nut mixture, to keep it from getting too clumpy, and add a teaspoon of vanilla to it(I also had some hazelnut extract that was amazing). Stir this into the nuts.

I then mix the same amount of oatmeal, by volume, to the nut/date mixture...stir it up really good and ziplock it. Just have to add boiling water and stir. More filling, better texture and way more tasty than plain old oatmeal or those disgusting quaker packets.
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post #45 of (permalink) Old 01-13-2012, 10:08 PM
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I buy Irish Oatmeal that you can microwave and I add sliced banana before I nuke it. Makes it very nice and sweet.

If I'm going all out I will put a couple of spoonfuls of plain yoghurt on top, followed by a sprinkling of granola. Takes it to a whole new level

Also may add a bit of maple syrup, cinnamon or some blueberries.
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