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post #16 of (permalink) Old 09-18-2020, 11:12 PM
CEB
Scaling New Heights
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Lake Country, BC
Interest: Backpacking, hiking, Skiing, Mtn Biking, Windsurfing, Dirt Biking
Posts: 88
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Quote:
Originally Posted by russellcoffin View Post
The biggest difference is that the wind jacket will be highly breathable (20 cfm plus) while the rain jacket will be clammy once active. Rain jacket does the job when sitting at camp. A wind jacket should be max 150 grams, and you can find cheap ones for <100 grams. The Patagonia Houdini and Arcteryx Squamish are on the heavier and pricier side
I think youíre thinking of a different jacket (maybe the OR Helium??). The Patagonia Houdini is around 105-115gr. I have 2 and got the last one on sale for $80. I absolutely love it. I wear it as a wind jacket, bug or sun protection and even as a rain jacket in light rain as it keeps me just warm enough but not clammy, like you mentioned Rain Jackets do when hiking in. Once it stops raining my body heat dries it out really fast. Itís one of my favourite pieces of gear. I carry one in my hiking bag and one in my bike bag
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post #17 of (permalink) Old 09-19-2020, 06:53 PM
Scaling New Heights
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Edmonton, AB, Canada.
Posts: 59
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As I get older, I find that I get tired more quickly and have resolved to travel with lighter gear. I've managed to get down to about 20 lb for a comfortable, non-ultralight base weight, not counting food or the clothes on my back, by trading in my old backpack, tent and stove for lighter and smaller kit. Add in additional gear if needed (crampons, gaiters, SIL tarp) and food, I get to about 35-40 lb, which is a good weight for me for a week. Down from about 50-55 lb, I'm enjoying my trips a lot more this year. I remember last year having to perch my backpack on a rock and getting under it to hoist it onto my back. This year I just sling it on with one hand.

I've found that paying more for good quality, lighter kit is a good investment in enjoying the backcountry. If you take care of it, quality gear will last for years and lighten your load for many thousands of step. Exactly what to choose is always highly personal and definitely makes for many rounds of social media debate.
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Scott Meadows
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post #18 of (permalink) Old 09-20-2020, 02:17 PM Thread Starter
Scaling New Heights
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 98
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Thanks for all the advice. @CEB I'll check out the Houdini as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by esmeadows View Post
As I get older, I find that I get tired more quickly and have resolved to travel with lighter gear. I've managed to get down to about 20 lb for a comfortable, non-ultralight base weight, not counting food or the clothes on my back, by trading in my old backpack, tent and stove for lighter and smaller kit.
@esmeadows, I'd be quite happy with a 20lb base weight and 40lbs total for a weeklong trip.

Quote:
Originally Posted by esmeadows View Post
I've found that paying more for good quality, lighter kit is a good investment in enjoying the backcountry. If you take care of it, quality gear will last for years and lighten your load for many thousands of step. Exactly what to choose is always highly personal and definitely makes for many rounds of social media debate.
Agreed. I like that there is relatively little of this here on CT and was hesitant to post, but I've gotten good advice and now I'm tempted to post asking for more. It's been over 10 years since I invested significantly in a lot of new gear so it's good to hear a lot of opinions and options of what people actually use.
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post #19 of (permalink) Old 09-27-2020, 09:11 AM
Headed for the Mountains
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Calgary
Posts: 145
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I'm a fan of Ortovox Swisswool at the moment. The Zebru jacket seems to be the lightest with hood in their program. It's not as fragile as a down jacket, you can use it with a backpack without worrying, it doesn't stink as quickly as a synthetic jacket, it's still nice to wear when wet, I would say that it dries quickly and I guess the sheep had a better life. There will be new styles this winter so maybe offers pop up - even though there had been sales here and there and Valhalla has reduced the selection.
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post #20 of (permalink) Old 09-30-2020, 07:40 AM Thread Starter
Scaling New Heights
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 98
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@Kokanee75 thanks for letting me know about those jackets! They look a bit pricey but also more versatile than down and not much heavier.
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post #21 of (permalink) Old 10-08-2020, 05:05 PM
Headed for the Mountains
 
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Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Vancouver
Posts: 192
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CEB View Post
I think youíre thinking of a different jacket (maybe the OR Helium??). The Patagonia Houdini is around 105-115gr. I have 2 and got the last one on sale for $80. I absolutely love it. I wear it as a wind jacket, bug or sun protection and even as a rain jacket in light rain as it keeps me just warm enough but not clammy, like you mentioned Rain Jackets do when hiking in. Once it stops raining my body heat dries it out really fast. Itís one of my favourite pieces of gear. I carry one in my hiking bag and one in my bike bag
I was just referencing the weight of the Squamish, which is on the high side of wind jackets. Helium is a rain jacket. I agree that the Houdini is a great jacket.
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post #22 of (permalink) Old 10-17-2020, 03:41 PM Thread Starter
Scaling New Heights
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 98
Default Recommendations for replacing big 3 gear items

I wrote a longer post but figured it wouldnít get read so hereís a short version.

My big 3 are 6.1kg (13.5lbs) and I figure I can get it down to 2.5-3kg (5.5-6.5lbs) if I replace my old gear.
What would you suggest if purchasing a new tent, sleeping bag, and pack?

Use case: 4-6 day hikes in Canadian Rockies, mostly summer, some late spring / early fall.
Notes: 1) Tent should be able to fit 2 people when necessary. 2) Iím not going to be fully ultralight, the pack needs to be able to support 35+lbs for longer trips. 3) Price range around $1000(US) for all three.

I would love specific gear recommendations or general advice, such as:

Tent - Freestanding or time to move on to hiking pole or even tarp setup? Will those be comfortable?

Pack - How much less comfortable would a frameless pack be?

Sleeping bag - Advice when switching to a down bag? Is a quilt a better option? How about using a liner and getting a lighter bag? What temperature rating can I get away with?

I figure the big 3 is the best way to reduce weight but happy to get suggestions on lightweight warm layers, rain gear, socks, footwear and food.
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post #23 of (permalink) Old Yesterday, 10:33 AM
Hittin' the Trails
 
Join Date: Oct 2020
Posts: 1
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I also use Paradox jacket, it is quite great for its price.

..
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