Tips for staying warm at night? - Page 2 - ClubTread Community

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post #16 of (permalink) Old 10-03-2017, 02:05 PM
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Number one IMO is don't scrimp on a bag. Shivering in your bag thinking of the two hundred bucks you saved won't really bring you needed comfort. Life's too short. 2) Buy a DOWN bag with the best goose down available. Nothing insulates as well as down on a per weight basis as goose down, and not a combination of feathers and down either. The added advantage of down is it compresses far better.

Let me know how it works out
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post #17 of (permalink) Old 01-30-2018, 12:15 PM
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Not sure if this thread is still active, but I'll be making my first trip to the Canadian Rockies in late August. Never occurred to me that my 30 degree bag (Marmot Plasma 30) might not be enough, but as I read trip reports to where I'm headed, and see pictures of snow, I'm not sure anymore. I'll be in Jasper National park camping at 7,000-something feet. Anyone have an opinion? Do I need more?
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post #18 of (permalink) Old 01-31-2018, 12:33 AM
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Is that 30 F? Basically freezing? Then it might be cold, Rockies are unpredictable and temps can drop below zero and it can snow any day of year; late August anything is possible even at lower altitudes from what you are planning

Re prev comments, yes don't sleep hungry. Only problem (for me) if I eat before bed, I can't sleep! Seriously though woodenshoes is bang on, never skimp on sleeping bag
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post #19 of (permalink) Old 02-01-2018, 12:10 AM
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I had a trip once where all nights but one were in huts. Well.. that one night was also in a hut, but an open one with only partial walls. I was using a 0*C Down bag and my pad was rated at R-value of 4.7, and it was definitely below 0 judging by the ice on the roof in the morning (the snow patches around the lake should have been a warning). I got up several times in the night, put on every article of clothing I had including my toque and fleece gloves, ate nuts etc, did jumping jacks.. and I was still seriously cold. I think the only somewhat warm hiker in our group that night was the one who had his dog along and curled up beside him.
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post #20 of (permalink) Old 02-01-2018, 09:13 AM
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Yes, Zeljikok, basically freezing or 0*C. I've used it into the low 30's F, and certainly was glad I had my thermal's and even a fleece jacket. I looked at weather history for Yoho National Park as a proxy for August 30 (https://www.wunderground.com/history...eqdb.wmo=71786), and didn't see any lows below freezing but I realize I'll often be at higher elevation. More interested in the experience of folks who have been there in late August.

Lythe - when was the trip you described? Do you know the elevation?

Thanks
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post #21 of (permalink) Old 02-02-2018, 11:08 PM
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The trip was early May last year, elevation 820m (but close to the ocean) on the Sunshine Coast Trail. I guess elevation alone isn't a good factor, a mountain top at 1000m can easily be colder than a valley at 1500m and Elk Lake is pretty much on a peak.
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post #22 of (permalink) Old 02-04-2018, 07:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeP View Post
Not sure if this thread is still active, but I'll be making my first trip to the Canadian Rockies in late August. Never occurred to me that my 30 degree bag (Marmot Plasma 30) might not be enough, but as I read trip reports to where I'm headed, and see pictures of snow, I'm not sure anymore. I'll be in Jasper National park camping at 7,000-something feet. Anyone have an opinion? Do I need more?
Different people sleep with different comforts. Personally, I would freeze in the Canadian Rockies in a 0C bag. But how do you sleep? What is the temperature usually like when you are comfortable in that 30F bag?
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post #23 of (permalink) Old 02-05-2018, 10:35 AM
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Thanks for the feedback Rachelo. I'm very interested in the opinions of those who've been there. For anyone stumbling across this post I'd say the Marmot 30F is truth in advertising - great bag into the mid 30's, really starting to push it into the very low 30's. Light as a feather and super-compressible, I love it. I hate to add weight and bulk, but will likely do so given what I'm reading here.
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post #24 of (permalink) Old 02-05-2018, 02:38 PM
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Maybe being warm at night is overrated

https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine...ok-fat/383509/
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