Anyone use pyramid type shelters (Duomids and such)? - ClubTread Community

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post #1 of (permalink) Old 02-20-2016, 03:32 AM Thread Starter
Hittin' the Trails
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 36
Default Anyone use pyramid type shelters (Duomids and such)?

Just wondering if any one in these parts uses a pyramid type of shelters for their trips. I've been looking at a bunch and am looking for some real life experience.
The Duomid by MLD seems to be the most common type for solo stuff. My questions are around steepness of walls for headroom and ability to pitch on rougher, more uneven ground. Most of my days out are above treeline and sometimes sites aren't the most perfect in the world, the only flatish spot being about a body size.
I use a siltarp 2 now with polychrome ground sheet and a bug net if needed and am comfortable in most 3 season weather but sometimes its a little finicky in rougher weather setup and needs to be adjusted and monkeyed with if conditions change. I like the idea of set it and forget that a mid-type of shelter might offer for a few ounces more.
Anyone have any experience with one of these?
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post #2 of (permalink) Old 02-21-2016, 09:37 PM
Hittin' the Trails
 
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Location: PITT MEADOWS, British Columbia, Canada.
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Very interested in some responses i have my eye on one of these now as well.Currently using a ID wedge bivy with a siltarp but those mids could really shed some weight if they can really handle the unexpected nasty weather.
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post #3 of (permalink) Old 02-22-2016, 04:44 AM
Scaling New Heights
 
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I got a Duomid a few months ago. I've slept it in a handful of times and absolutely love it, I'm 5 foot 9 inches and have tons of room and im sure anyone up to 6'3 would be in the same boat. Same thing as setting up any tarp as far as ground evenness. You can sit up and change with lots of room to spare and the steepness of the walls definitely helps with not rubbing your sleeping bag against the sides.

There are pros and cons to every shelter design of course, but this one seems to have the most pros out of any that I've seen. Their popularity is certainly deserved and MLD is known to make very good quality products. You could use it for light 4 season stuff and you can really batten it down in a storm.
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post #4 of (permalink) Old 02-23-2016, 12:40 AM Thread Starter
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I'm about 6'2" so that's good to hear! I've even thought that corner to corner could be the way to go. My thoughts were more around set up and site "pickiness"of the design. It seems like it needs to be pitched somewhere you can get an even plane on the base or can you just throw it up anywhere? All the pictures I've seen have it pitched on perfect level ground. I've never met anyone with one here in Vancouver or seen one on any trips but it could be the solution I'm looking for. Thanks for the response.
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post #5 of (permalink) Old 02-24-2016, 04:01 PM
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I've written on these forums many times, extolling the virtues of my HMG Ultramid 2. This four season shelter weights half or less than most tents, is larger and can withstand the worst weather conditions handily.

I honestly can't think why more folks aren't using mids. The one and only down side is not having a floor, but even that's usually a plus since I can wear muddy hiking boots in it and dig out the floor for winter camping.

http://www.explor8ion.com/hiking-light.html for more details.

Vern Dewit
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post #6 of (permalink) Old 02-24-2016, 05:49 PM
Off the Beaten Path
 
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One problem that I discovered last year using a tarp, is that my wife was afraid of creepy-crawlies.
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post #7 of (permalink) Old 02-27-2016, 03:53 PM
Scaling New Heights
 
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Originally Posted by sthorout View Post
I'm about 6'2" so that's good to hear! I've even thought that corner to corner could be the way to go. My thoughts were more around set up and site "pickiness"of the design. It seems like it needs to be pitched somewhere you can get an even plane on the base or can you just throw it up anywhere? All the pictures I've seen have it pitched on perfect level ground. I've never met anyone with one here in Vancouver or seen one on any trips but it could be the solution I'm looking for. Thanks for the response.
I don't see why it would be any different than a tent as far as having to be pitched on perfect level ground, this is ideal of course but usually you can just put some debris under you to level it out, I prefer to sleep on a slight angle anyways (head higher than feet).

I've used tarps for 6-7 years and spend 70+ nights outside every year and have never had an issue. Site selection is key of course, but you'll figure that out with more experience. The most important thing is to make sure that if it rains that you will not have it pool around you.

There's a million pages on the internet about how to set up a tarp and other techniques. I'd just make sure to set it up in your yard or in the park before you actually go out in the woods. You don't want to be stuck in a storm and not know how to properly set it up.
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post #8 of (permalink) Old 02-28-2016, 02:04 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks Jay, looking at your profile it seems we are on similar "shelter" trajectories but you may be a season ahead of me. I've also spent many nights under the trusty 8x10 flat tarp and am pretty confident in setup for all 3 season conditions but there is something about the bomber setup of a mid that is seductive. Its just that sometimes I find myself limited in available spots because of approaching night or just wanting to sleep in some cool spot that could be tight. The footprint of a mid and need to have 4 stake points on a relative plane to get a tight pitch hold me back. I think I've grown so used to being able to flop anywhere with a tarp that I need to adjust my thinking back a decade or so to when I last used a tent.
Really enjoyed your Spectrum Pass report, I was in Griswold Pass this past season and was looking at Monmouth and thinking about future trips up that way.
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Last edited by sthorout; 02-28-2016 at 02:06 AM.
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