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post #16 of (permalink) Old 04-09-2015, 06:55 PM
High on the Mountain Top
 
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Originally Posted by Dru View Post
In summer you can get away with a light bag. Something like the MontBell Down Hugger +5C compresses down to the size of a Nalgene, weighs a pound or so.

I would personally take a light windshell for wearing when moving and a puffy for wearing when stopped instead of planning to hike with a fleece on.
+1

Also, don't forget that layering in clothing that you would wear around camp as part of your 'sleep system' is an excellent way to supplement taking a much lighter less warm sleeping bag or quilt and thereby reducing weight.
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post #17 of (permalink) Old 04-09-2015, 07:37 PM
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I think all of the important topics have been said. My thoughts are

1) List all the gear and go through the items 1 by 1 and you'll end up with savings quick.
2) Don't cheap on food weight, it never ends well.
3) Have 100% separate sleep clothes from hiking clothes. If you sweat to much and/or they get wet somehow, you'll be cold almost regardless of sleeping bag.
4) I bring a rain/wind jacket and then a puffy jacket separate. I don't pack fleece. I never wear the puffy jacket when moving.
5) Some of the top ultra-light through hikes target 10-13 pounds for the Pacific Crest Trail. If your targeting 15 pounds, you'll be fine (this excludes Water and Food)
6) Smart choice the tarp-tent. Some of the lightest weight sleep pads are the most comfortable in my opinion (however $$$). I would look at a cuban fibre pack. Great way to save weight, but they can be pricey. Don't overload them, you'll kill them!

My thoughts....

RB
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post #18 of (permalink) Old 04-09-2015, 10:12 PM
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A good rule of thumb for calories is 3500 for little to no elevation, 4000 for mountains..

But some people are different, for some altitude affects their appetite. You will have to tweek according to your experiences..

Just don't make the mistake of packing food that makes sense from a calorie/weight standpoint, but that you don't like!

Anyhoo, getting off topic..

I like my little Patagonia Houdini wind jacket that I bought on here used.. Packs super small, light, and great for those times when you need just a bit extra, but a midlayer or proper shell would be too much..

Who needs a signature? Mine is always: Last edited by dougz; Today at 03:27 PM
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post #19 of (permalink) Old 04-09-2015, 10:55 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by dougz View Post
A good rule of thumb for calories is 3500 for little to no elevation, 4000 for mountains..

But some people are different, for some altitude affects their appetite. You will have to tweek according to your experiences..

Just don't make the mistake of packing food that makes sense from a calorie/weight standpoint, but that you don't like!

Anyhoo, getting off topic..

I like my little Patagonia Houdini wind jacket that I bought on here used.. Packs super small, light, and great for those times when you need just a bit extra, but a midlayer or proper shell would be too much..
Thanks! That helps. My lightweight "wind shell" is the Helium II, even though it's proven itself as being more than capable of taking rain.

I'm definitely considering getting a summer bag, but I think down would definitely be too risky for me and that I'll stick to synthetic. More than considering, actually, I plan on doing it. With either of my base layers and my fleece, I'm good until about 10 degrees just standing around (which is supposed to be the average low on the West Coast Trail). I was wondering if, for that reason, I would be good with the Marmot Cloudbreak 30 sleeping bag? It's not a true 0 degree C bag, it's comfort rated to about 5 C, but I'm wondering if this should be good for me.

https://www.liveoutthere.com/marmot-cloudbreak-30.html

Thanks!

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post #20 of (permalink) Old 04-10-2015, 01:03 AM
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Colin4567 your tent is light and if you get the Neo Air X -Lite (I second that recommendation) then that's light. This leaves you with your sleeping bag and your pack out of the four main items that need improving.

Obviously everyone sleeps differently but I have used a summer bag on both the WCT and Nootka with no issues at all. I have a TNF Lynx (synthetic 4 degrees) and a TNF Hightail 2s (down, 2 degrees). Last May I even did Nootka with a $30 summer (read 'indoor') bag from Fields in Gold River because someone dropped my Hightail out of the back of their car while we were arranging gear in Nanaimo (thanks!!). Even that worked fairly well for me with an added base layer. The two nights when it was clear and cold I just added my emergency blanket and was fine. Oh and I might have made myself a Nalgene hot water bottle too. Put the water in boiling hot right to the brim, wrap it instantly in some item of clothing and put it directly into the bag and it will give off good heat until 4am (if you put it in about 10pm) and will still be warming you a bit when you wake up. For me that bag you're looking at will be fine.

So, there's only your pack to go really. I sometimes use a TNF Prophet 65. It weighs in at 1840g for a medium. I like it a lot. It's not too pricey either. There are obviously other good packs out there in the 1650-1850g range. I do think people ignore the potential weight savings of a lighter pack perhaps more than they do the other 'big 3' items. Of course fit and features may be more important here for some rather than weight and the savings in weight aren't usually as good for packs compared to the others but they shouldn't be ignored.

Finally, once you've sorted your big ticket items, you need to look at the other stuff you're bringing. Are you just bringing too much? Are there items that you could bring that have multiple uses? Are your little 'luxuries' that you like to bring really worth the extra weight?

Anyway, good luck with it. Sounds to me like you already know what to do and that you'll get it down pretty good. :-)
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post #21 of (permalink) Old 04-11-2015, 09:12 PM
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As others have said your tent is light and the neoair should make a huge difference in weight. Your sleeping bag weighs in at about 1.5 kilos, you can get that down to about 700-800 grams with a down bag like this (http://www.mec.ca/product/5035-436/m...880&f=10+50880) or a synthetic like this (http://www.mountainhardwear.com/hype...over20#start=0). Other than that, a lighter pack and maybe a lightweight one person cookset (something like the GSI halulite minimalist) would make a decent difference.
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post #22 of (permalink) Old 04-11-2015, 11:21 PM
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FamilyGuy, would you be willing to share your WCT gear list? I noticed you have hiked the trail multiple times and I've noticed some of your gear posts on backpacking light.
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post #23 of (permalink) Old 04-12-2015, 10:43 AM
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I think the first decision you have to make is whether you're a hiker or a camper. If you opt for the former you've chosen to cover longer distances each day but without sacrificing comfort or safety.

Then follow the 343 rule. Your big three systems- pack, shelter, and sleeping system including pad - should weigh no more than three kilos.

Here's a good guide that will help you get started.

http://www.backpackingnorth.com/ultr...over-overview/
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post #24 of (permalink) Old 04-12-2015, 09:52 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks guys!

By coincidence, I actually bought the HyperLamina Spark 35 from Atmosphere yesterday in Coquitlam. Didn't even know they had it! I think it's super light. I will hopefully be going for the Xlite too soon, and I'll make sure to try your other recommended methods for going lighter!

Thank you!

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post #25 of (permalink) Old 04-22-2015, 02:39 PM
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I did the WCT last year, going light makes the trail soooo much more enjoyable, it's nice to have some extra energy at the end of a day when you're collecting firewood and sitting around with friends.

I ended up at 11.2lbs base weight, 11.7lbs of food/water for a total trailhead pack weight of 23.2lbs. An additional 4.0lbs of worn gear (clothes, shoes, knife, etc) made a skin-out of 27.3lbs. I was militant about measuring everything as well. If it didn't make it into the spreadsheet, it didn't come with me, none of that "grab a couple things before leaving" bs.

I planned calories out, and made plans for eating at Moniques and Nitnat, plus grabbing some chips/candy @ Moniques.

Worked very well, I don't think I would have changed much.

I don't have the gear list online, but feel free to PM me if you want the spreadsheet I made.
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post #26 of (permalink) Old 04-22-2015, 03:41 PM
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Nobody ever seems to respond to this suggestion - but if you want light it's hard to beat hyperlitemountaingear (HMG) stuff. I have their packs (3400 and 4400) and their two person Mid. Expensive but very tough, completely waterproof and very light. I got my stuff on discount while keeping an eye out for sales.

Also second the idea to weight everything you bring and add it all up. The "little bits" count. I wrote a blog on this a few months ago too, if you're interested.

Vern Dewit
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post #27 of (permalink) Old 04-22-2015, 04:25 PM
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Wow, that IS pricey! How did you snag the discount?

Wish I knew about this stuff before I bought my heavy MEC tents!

I could use the insert and use it with my Siltarp, though.. HATE bugs..

Who needs a signature? Mine is always: Last edited by dougz; Today at 03:27 PM
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post #28 of (permalink) Old 04-22-2015, 04:56 PM
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Originally Posted by dougz View Post
Wow, that IS pricey! How did you snag the discount?

Wish I knew about this stuff before I bought my heavy MEC tents!

I could use the insert and use it with my Siltarp, though.. HATE bugs..
I subscribed to their newsletter and they had a 40% off sale on their packs on Boxing day. They had another one in February and I just got the bug insert yesterday at a discount too.

Vern Dewit
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post #29 of (permalink) Old 04-22-2015, 05:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vern.dewit View Post
Nobody ever seems to respond to this suggestion - but if you want light it's hard to beat hyperlitemountaingear (HMG) stuff. I have their packs (3400 and 4400) and their two person Mid. Expensive but very tough, completely waterproof and very light. I got my stuff on discount while keeping an eye out for sales.

Also second the idea to weight everything you bring and add it all up. The "little bits" count. I wrote a blog on this a few months ago too, if you're interested.
Great blog post Vern, my goal this year is to go lighter and you make some great points!
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post #30 of (permalink) Old 04-22-2015, 05:24 PM
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How were the customs charges, etc?

Who needs a signature? Mine is always: Last edited by dougz; Today at 03:27 PM
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