Looking for a new stove - Page 3 - ClubTread Community

User Tag List

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #31 of (permalink) Old 11-23-2013, 07:18 AM
High on the Mountain Top
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: , , Canada.
Posts: 2,427
Default

Quote:
quote:Originally posted by wildtrekker

Quote:
quote:Originally posted by peter1955

Trangia. Light, cheap and completely reliable. Fine for summer trips but no good for melting snow. Try it - you'll like it.
The only thing I am concerned about is not being able to adjust the heat.
The Trangia has a simmer ring that lets you cut the output just by setting it to half-closed once the water is boiled. The stove has its drawbacks (and which one doesn't?) but for the price, it works well.
peter1955 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #32 of (permalink) Old 12-01-2013, 11:48 AM
dsk
Headed for the Mountains
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: , Hakadal, Norway.
Interest: Backpack stovesBackpacking
Posts: 160
Default

The Trangia as a system has several possibilities, I would like to point out the non-stick version, and the gas burner.
http://trangia.se/english/2913.trangia_stoves.html Take a look at no 27-6

The Trangia gas burner (Butane/Propane mix or Isobutane) are better than many other made for use with Trangia, because it has a preheating tube going trough the flames. This makes it possible to run in colder weather.

In addition, lots of multifuel or other stoves may be integrated in the system.

This is a good option, but does not fit well to the thread-startes specifications as I read it.

dsk
dsk is offline  
post #33 of (permalink) Old 12-09-2013, 03:49 PM
Headed for the Mountains
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: , , .
Posts: 130
Default

Quote:
quote:Originally posted by wildtrekker

Are the isobutane canisters refillable or just recyclable?

They are recyclable if you use the tool below (or something similar)

http://www.rei.com/product/813638/je...recycling-tool
Kingpin63 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #34 of (permalink) Old 12-09-2013, 08:07 PM
Headed for the Mountains
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Gulf Islands, BC, Canada.
Posts: 238
Default

Lots of great suggestions here.

I upgraded my Coleman Peak (beast) to a Snowpeak Gigapower stove that I bought at MEC for about $40 about four years ago. It's light, really compact and has performed well at altitude in winter conditions (-15C). In summer, don't even worry about it.

For the longest time, my big issue was the lack of recycling facilities for the canister stoves. Those canisters were always a hotly debated topic on trips. While the debate simmers on, I think people have warmed to prospect of canister stoves to a considerable degree.

While on a trip in Japan in 2009, I stayed at a hostel with a dedicated recycling container for used canisters. These stoves are the norm among hikers and mountaineers in Japan and Korea - the land of LNG. Disposal facilities exist and people use them. By punching a hole in the base, one can easily crush the empty canister for easy transport. Do not attempt to crush against forehead. These are considerably stronger than your average beer can.

When I got back to BC I realized my local recycle depot accepts the crushed cartridges as they would any old tin of beans or kippered herring fillets. I'm still using more resources than with my old stove but the cost hasn't been prohibitive for my situation. Since making the switch, I've also discovered a way to refill the canisters with cheaper isobutane canisters that you can get from your local building supply shop. The adapter is available from a company in Taiwan for 10 bucks. Never tried it.

juandefuca is offline  
post #35 of (permalink) Old 12-14-2013, 09:42 AM
dsk
Headed for the Mountains
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: , Hakadal, Norway.
Interest: Backpack stovesBackpacking
Posts: 160
Default

Refilling canisters are discussed here:http://tinyurl.com/psum9ke
I have tried, and I want say I never do it again, but.
I would rather say, when you have some with a slump of gas, you could fill all over to one, and be able to use more of the gas, but the they are not made for refilling, and has a more limited lifetime than a refillable tank.

dsk
dsk is offline  
post #36 of (permalink) Old 12-14-2013, 04:42 PM
Headed for the Mountains
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Van Isl, B.C., Canada.
Interest: Snowboarding, Dirtbiking, Hiking and camping
Posts: 198
Default

If price is not a problem, I would check out the Soto lineup : http://www.sotooutdoors.com/products/index.html#stoves They have won awards from Backpacker magazines and others. Even their canister stoves work at higher elevation/colder temps than any other canister stoves on the market. They are the best stoves on the market right now. Compare the stats with MSR or any others. They are updating their Muka right now, and may have an updated/improved one out this spring?. Good luck with your searches.
Kobracom is offline  
post #37 of (permalink) Old 12-17-2013, 12:16 AM
Scaling New Heights
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: , , .
Posts: 59
Default

Wildtrekker,
A previous responder asked for details of your usage and what season(s) you are most active. Try to give us more details of your requirement. In one of your responses you indicated a preference to simmer; is simmering a must or good to have feature? Did you learn the art of simmering with the Whisperlite and want better simmering with a new stove?

As a gear ***** I have everything from homemade "small" Altoids Esbit/Meth stoves to beercan stoves, other simmering ability meth stoves, wood stoves (nomadicstovecompany.com / Vargo titanium), Monatauk GNat, to the good old beast Coleman Apex and Whisperlite white gas stoves.

Each stove has pros and cons.
I use meth/wood stoves the most during Spring/Summer and use Esbit/wood stoves for winter.
The canister/white gas stoves are used for base camp/hiking with wife - she dislikes waiting for her meal =)
BCBoy88 is offline  
post #38 of (permalink) Old 12-18-2013, 02:12 PM Thread Starter
Headed for the Mountains
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: , AB, .
Posts: 481
Default

Hey BCBoy88,

I suppose some more details would be stove usage would be for mainly spring/summer months.
I would say yes to simmer, I prefer to cook meals instead of boiling just water. I can't eat most of those boil water dinners anyways.
I want something preferably light and compact.
In crappy weather I find it a pain to prime my whisperlite. The reason I started this thread was to find something that I didn't need to prime really, with some other options open of course.
wildtrekker is offline  
post #39 of (permalink) Old 12-18-2013, 04:51 PM
High on the Mountain Top
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Qualicum Beach, BC, Canada.
Interest: general mountaineering/ hiking/ backpacking/ skiing/ kayaking
Posts: 1,704
Default

I have a Soto canister top stove for really light trips.It has a nice compact windscreen and folds up small. Even though it burns hot and full on, right to the bottom of the tank, I don't like the tippyness of canister top stoves. A few years ago Brunton made a stand for canister top stoves, that would convert them into a remote canister stove, but they stopped making them. If anyone in Club Tread land has one they'd like to sell, I'd buy.
prother is offline  
post #40 of (permalink) Old 12-26-2013, 10:02 AM Thread Starter
Headed for the Mountains
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: , AB, .
Posts: 481
Default

Well I just got the pocket rocket. And so far I love it.
Small( easy to pack), lightweight. Easy to light and assemble.

Have yet to boil water, or cook food with it. The only thing that I still need to check out is how to clean it/ maintenance if any and how good it works in windy conditions. I noticed it has the little divider windscreen built in the middle of the burner, but not sure how well that's going to work.

Aside from that, I do like how you can have a full burner and simmer as well, though without a windscreen and the fact that you cant really have one with the fuel bottle attached, wondering how if at all you can simmer and cook food on it at the same time without the wind blowing all the heat away.

Thanks for all the replies. I'll still be on the lookout for another stove it seems though.
wildtrekker is offline  
post #41 of (permalink) Old 12-26-2013, 10:35 AM
High on the Mountain Top
 
dougz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Mackenzie, BC, Canada.
Interest: hiking, skiing, camping, SAR, Canadian Rangers (army reserve)
Posts: 1,515
Default

Yeah, wind can be a problem.. But as you say, only when trying to simmer.

I don't THINK there's anything to be done, maintenence-wise..

I haven't had to do anything with it, anways.
dougz is offline  
post #42 of (permalink) Old 12-29-2013, 10:57 PM
Scaling New Heights
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: , , .
Posts: 59
Default

Wildtrekker,
I apologize for the delayed response; Congratulations on the new purchase!
My Gnat is of similar design and I use a homemade tinfoil to shield the stove from wind.

If the gear-bug hits you again try a alcohol stove with simmering.
BCBoy88 is offline  
post #43 of (permalink) Old 12-29-2013, 11:29 PM Thread Starter
Headed for the Mountains
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: , AB, .
Posts: 481
Default

Oh no worries. I just 'googled' the gnat and it is pretty tiny.
I suppose I'll keep one eye out if something handy pops up.
Happy New Year.
wildtrekker is offline  
post #44 of (permalink) Old 12-30-2013, 06:16 AM
High on the Mountain Top
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Fraser Valley
Interest: Photography, Nature Observation, Health & Fitness, Nutrition, Shinrin-yoku
Posts: 1,667
Default

Quote:
quote:Originally posted by wildtrekker

Thanks for all the replies. I'll still be on the lookout for another stove it seems though.
I use a mini Trangia and like it but at one time I planned to order the ThermoJet Microlight stove. The only problem was the inventor was so far behind in making them that he couldn't keep up with the orders so there was a long wait list. That was a few years ago and he may have resolved that problem. http://www.thermojetstove.com/index.htm
solo75 is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome
 

Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.1