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-   -   Stuck cable MSR Simmerlite (https://forums.clubtread.com/14-gotta-love-gear/44438-stuck-cable-msr-simmerlite.html)

sandy 03-11-2013 01:57 PM

Stuck cable MSR Simmerlite
 
After many years of working well, our Simmerlite is now reduced to a weak sputtering flame. I've taken it apart and cleaned it as much as possible to no avail. I think there must be some kind of blockage (I'm thinking sand from all the beach camping we've been doing) somewhere along the fuel cable, but, I cannot get the wretched fuel cable out. I believe (and MSR says) the cable is supposed to pull out relatively easily. Certainly, in previous MSR stoves I've always been able to yank the cable out, but the cable in this one doesn't budge.

Anyone have any tips on how to get the cable out? We've been reefing on it so hard the cable will break soon.


mclay1234 03-11-2013 02:18 PM

I have the same stove and remember that removing the wire was *really* difficult! I used pliers and was pretty sure I was going to break it too. More force might be necessary.

On a related note, and this is going to make me sound completely dumb, but have you checked the orientation of the plastic fuel line on the pump? It's supposed to point in the opposite direction than the hard plastic pump part, like this: http://www.lifeviewoutdoors.com/hiki...fuel-pump.html The reason I mention this is that after a winter of storage ours had twisted...the net result being that when the fuel bottle was on its side the fuel line was in an air space, hence giving a weak and sputtering flame. Despite the absurd simplicity of the problem, it took hours and several unnecessary cleanings for me to finally realize what was going on - I'd just assumed it was dirty and didn't even know that line could twist! I doubt anyone else would miss this, but just in case I thought I'd mention it.

hafilax 03-11-2013 03:22 PM

I used a pair of vise-grips to pull the wire out of my whisperlite. IIRC, it went back in relatively easily after cleaning.

pmicheals 03-11-2013 04:18 PM

Quote:

quote:Originally posted by mclay1234

I have the same stove and remember that removing the wire was *really* difficult! I used pliers and was pretty sure I was going to break it too. More force might be necessary.

On a related note, and this is going to make me sound completely dumb, but have you checked the orientation of the plastic fuel line on the pump? It's supposed to point in the opposite direction than the hard plastic pump part, like this: http://www.lifeviewoutdoors.com/hiki...fuel-pump.html The reason I mention this is that after a winter of storage ours had twisted...the net result being that when the fuel bottle was on its side the fuel line was in an air space, hence giving a weak and sputtering flame. Despite the absurd simplicity of the problem, it took hours and several unnecessary cleanings for me to finally realize what was going on - I'd just assumed it was dirty and didn't even know that line could twist! I doubt anyone else would miss this, but just in case I thought I'd mention it.
Good point

pmicheals 03-11-2013 04:51 PM

Quote:

quote:Originally posted by mclay1234

I have the same stove and remember that removing the wire was *really* difficult! I used pliers and was pretty sure I was going to break it too. More force might be necessary.

On a related note, and this is going to make me sound completely dumb, but have you checked the orientation of the plastic fuel line on the pump? It's supposed to point in the opposite direction than the hard plastic pump part, like this: http://www.lifeviewoutdoors.com/hiki...fuel-pump.html The reason I mention this is that after a winter of storage ours had twisted...the net result being that when the fuel bottle was on its side the fuel line was in an air space, hence giving a weak and sputtering flame. Despite the absurd simplicity of the problem, it took hours and several unnecessary cleanings for me to finally realize what was going on - I'd just assumed it was dirty and didn't even know that line could twist! I doubt anyone else would miss this, but just in case I thought I'd mention it.
Keep in mind that these fuel lines are supsect to not only the above situation but also water in the fuel and contaminants. I clean my line more often than once per year. Maintaining these stove fuel lines is like maintaining an aircraft turbine engine fuel line. They are quite similar in appearance and function. It's important to do it often, especially the fuel line and don't forget to use the supplied lubricant. (they forget to mention that)
1. Scour Fuel Line
2. Remove Cable from Fuel Line with Jet and Cable Tool.
Stubborn cables can be loosened with a common lubricant (WD-40™, Pump Cup Oil, etc.).
3. Fully reinsert Cable into Fuel Line.
4. Move Cable in and out with 5-inch (13-cm) strokes approximately 20 times.
5. Wipe Cable clean.

Water and contaminants will effect and corode the inside of the fuel line housing and that is why I clean the line more often.

blackfly 03-11-2013 08:47 PM


Aqua Terra 03-11-2013 08:54 PM

would it help, doing it when it at hot operating temp, if not already mentioned.

sandy 03-11-2013 11:32 PM

Thanks. I will try all that including the pump orientation. The video I can't view (hoping it isn't a cat video) as internet connection Downunder is slooooowwww. I've been trying WD40 but it is hard to actually get any right into the fuel line unless you can get the cable out.

hafilax 03-12-2013 08:38 AM

Quote:

quote:Originally posted by sandy

Thanks. I will try all that including the pump orientation. The video I can't view (hoping it isn't a cat video) as internet connection Downunder is slooooowwww. I've been trying WD40 but it is hard to actually get any right into the fuel line unless you can get the cable out.
It should wick in if you soak the cable that is exposed.

camshaft 03-13-2013 11:27 AM

As mentioned letting it soak in wd-40 is a great idea.

I was going to say buy a can but its like 30.00 bucks
http://www.homedepot.ca/product/wd-4...es-bulk/985861

Normally best method to get a stuck cable out would be soak in WD-40. Then apply some heat from a small hobby torch (in a controlled area as wd-40 flammable)
The area where carbon builds is in the loop area and the area you want to apply heat.

Or if you are close to a MEC i'm sure they would be happy to help you out.

Sodbuster 03-13-2013 05:11 PM

Nothing locks up a system like that like a few grains of sand.

Aqua Terra 03-14-2013 09:33 PM

heat it, small torch, outside and soaked in lube, do it in a non volatile area, dont wanna hear about any wildfires from this

sandy 03-15-2013 01:13 AM

Fixed without having to resort to blow-torches or other incendiary devices. WD helped.


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