CR-V tire chains - ClubTread Community

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post #1 of (permalink) Old 02-03-2013, 07:55 PM Thread Starter
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Default CR-V tire chains

I have a question for you Honda CR-V owners... I have a '99 with its "real-time 4wd", and the manual clearly states that tire chains should only go on the front wheels. That doesn't sit too well with me, as I would have thought that if you're in a position to actually need 4wd, then you'll need chains on the rear wheels too. But alas the manual predicts all sorts of horrors should you put chains on the rear wheels (end of the world, that kind of thing), and in general seems in denial about the 4wd ability of the vehicle.

So, what do you CR-V owners do? Stick to the front wheels? Put them on all 4 and ignore the manual?

Thanks!
Andy
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post #2 of (permalink) Old 02-03-2013, 08:29 PM
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Manual says the same for my Forester. Could be all kinds of reasons from suspension clearance to the AWD system and how it applies power.

I have carried chains in my Subaru and carried one pair and was prepared to install them on the front only.

BTW, practice putting them on.
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post #3 of (permalink) Old 02-03-2013, 11:32 PM
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If the 99 crv is like my 2007 crv, the front wheels are the primary drive wheels and the rears kick in when the crv thinks you need them. SOP is to put the chains on the drive wheels.

I would trust the manufacturer on this one.

Again if your 99 is like my 07, get dedicated snow tires and your chains will stay packed away in your trunk like mine do. My crv with snow tires kicks serious ass in the wet west coast coastal snow; I go drive around for fun during a snow fall.
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post #4 of (permalink) Old 02-04-2013, 12:03 AM
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by joker

If the 99 crv is like my 2007 crv, the front wheels are the primary drive wheels and the rears kick in when the crv thinks you need them. SOP is to put the chains on the drive wheels.
Just got an '09 Escape Hybrid with awd, and the manual says to put chains on the front only. These slip&grip systems, as joker said, primarily drive with the front wheels. It may overstress driveline components to let unchained front wheels spin while transferring power to the chained rear wheels. There may also be a limit on how much power can go to the rear, while presumably 100% can go to the front.

Today's small suv's, with the exception of the Grand Vitara, have most of their weight on the front end, so that's another reason to have the chains on the front. I've always put the chains on the back of the GV because of its perfect weight distribution and sturdy 4x4 drivetrain.

Some vehicles, like the X-Trail, or the Hylander Hybrid awd (using a third electric motor to run the back axle) can overheat their power transfer mechanism causing it to disengage.

However, I have one problem with this advice. It MAY be better to have the chains on the back for going down slippery steep descents. I'd rather have the vehicle "hanging" from the chained back wheels than lock up the unchained back end and have it come around. In this age of ABS, however, this may not be a valid concern. Having chains on the front helps maintain steering also.

Be sure to keep chains tight. If they're loose you can damage bodywork or cut brake lines. And don't even think about buying any chains except the Alpine/diamond back models. The simpler chains are just junk in comparison. Make sure you fit your chains before driving away from the store. After a bad experience last week at the Grandview Canadain Tire, I know that at this time of year chain displays can be in total disarray with wrong chains in the bags.
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post #5 of (permalink) Old 02-04-2013, 06:35 PM
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Even with a conventional 4WD (Jeep Wrangler) I still prefer to have them on the front. Reason is that the front wheels are your steering wheels, going up or down the hill. If you get into an oversteer type skid (i.e the rear end loses control) then you still have steering and should hopefully be able to steer your way through it, (or if really desperate put it in the ditch on the upslope side of the road rather than going for a tumble down the hill). Most modern AWD vehicles with traction/stability control and ABS usually are orientated towards front wheel understeer rather than rear wheel oversteer, and as other posters have mentioned, are also usually orientated towards driving the front axle only in most situations.

I have memories of descending a nasty little switch backed gravel road leading to club ski field in New Zealand in a Delica van with chains on the rear tyres only. We had no grip at all on the front axle, which tended to follow the fall line of the road, eventually sliding into a ditch, luckily on the upslope side. Waited hours for a snowcat to yank us out.

The only exception I could think of is if you were in a pickup with a trailer or heavy load in the bed over the rear axle.
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post #6 of (permalink) Old 02-05-2013, 12:48 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks all. I'll stick with front wheels only for now as the manual says. I spoke to one of the local Honda dealers and they were decidedly vague on the subject, ultimately just falling back on what the manual recommended.

Yeah, I've been caught out by not trying them at home first before :-) I'll be practicing before the weekend...

Cheers,
Andy
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post #7 of (permalink) Old 02-06-2013, 12:47 PM
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We've always put chains on the front tires of 4x4's. Not being able to steer while driving in deep snow would suck. Chaining up all 4 tires works if you're not planning on making very many sharp turns or if your driving an actual 4x4.
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post #8 of (permalink) Old 02-06-2013, 07:08 PM
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Well Andy, you need to do a little research first, as "real-time 4wd" is not what you think.
Basically in the simplest of terms its AWD on demand. When you lose traction in the front wheels the rear wheels will start to transmit power.
-I have included some further info below.

As for why the manufactures would say chains only on the fronts. Would be for the main reason the drivetrain to the rear tires is light duty. If you stick your head under the car and look at the axles you can see why. The rear CRV axles are like toothpicks compared to the front ones. The rear drivetrain just can't handle the possible stress chains could impose if the front lost traction.

Other things you have to remember with a CRV is that the front and rear diffs are open. So its very common to see a CRV with one wheel spinning front and one wheel spinning rear.

Quote:
quote:For most of the time, only the HR-V's front wheels are driven; it's only when they begin to lose grip that the Dual Pump system starts to send power to the rear wheels. This is achieved by a hydraulic torque-split system, consisting of a conventional front-wheel drive arrangement, complete with transfer case, a propeller shaft running the length of the vehicle and a Dual Pump system integrated with the rear differential. This is the heart of the system and comprises two hydraulic pumps, one driven by the front wheels via the prop shaft, the other by the rear wheels via the rear differential.
http://www.awdwiki.com/en/honda/

New 2012 system, has solenoid so computer can activate rear power transfer.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rux6jCbBfU4


Very good videos that I have posted:
https://www.clubtread.com/sforum/topi...TOPIC_ID=52841


Quote:
quote:Originally posted by aspersa

I have a question for you Honda CR-V owners... I have a '99 with its "real-time 4wd", and the manual clearly states that tire chains should only go on the front wheels. That doesn't sit too well with me, as I would have thought that if you're in a position to actually need 4wd, then you'll need chains on the rear wheels too. But alas the manual predicts all sorts of horrors should you put chains on the rear wheels (end of the world, that kind of thing), and in general seems in denial about the 4wd ability of the vehicle.

So, what do you CR-V owners do? Stick to the front wheels? Put them on all 4 and ignore the manual?

Thanks!
Andy
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post #9 of (permalink) Old 02-08-2013, 11:38 AM
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rear
front
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post #10 of (permalink) Old 02-08-2013, 09:55 PM
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If you have a rear-wheel drive, for god's sake don't put the chains on the front wheels.
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post #11 of (permalink) Old 02-08-2013, 10:04 PM
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by sgRant

If you have a rear-wheel drive, for god's sake don't put the chains on the front wheels.
best comment ever
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post #12 of (permalink) Old 02-10-2013, 12:47 PM
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Does your owners manual mention anything about using your chains at different rpm? I know for going up hill at generally better to be in a lower gear and higher rpms because firstly, higher rpm mean last torque applied to the wheels thus making it less burdensome on your chains. Second, If you start spinning, You have some RPM's to work with in that gear Before having to drop a gear. There are smarter and less smart ways of driving with chains on.
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post #13 of (permalink) Old 02-10-2013, 01:54 PM
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saw a crv with 4 chains sat at elfin lot. did you get 4?...

and a lot of cars with no chains dispite the chains manditory sign. though road wasn't too bad.
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post #14 of (permalink) Old 02-10-2013, 03:10 PM
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Ya Scott and we all know what happens later in the day. When the chainless clowns attempt to drive out.



Quote:
quote:Originally posted by smac

saw a crv with 4 chains sat at elfin lot. did you get 4?...

and a lot of cars with no chains dispite the chains manditory sign. though road wasn't too bad.





Both my pathfinder and Subaru have no info on how to drive in the snow. Most manufactures would be happy to just advise you not to drive.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OWwOJlOI1nU

Quote:
quote:Originally posted by BillyGoat

Does your owners manual mention anything about using your chains at different rpm? I know for going up hill at generally better to be in a lower gear and higher rpms because firstly, higher rpm mean last torque applied to the wheels thus making it less burdensome on your chains. Second, If you start spinning, You have some RPM's to work with in that gear Before having to drop a gear. There are smarter and less smart ways of driving with chains on.
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post #15 of (permalink) Old 02-10-2013, 08:45 PM
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I would think that in theory it would be better to put chains on the rear tires when driving downhill as one wouldn't want the back end to get in front of the front end. In the past I've put one chain on the front and one on the rear on opposing sides (left front/ right rear for example), but that was on an older 3/4 ton pick-up truck that didn't have all the fancy electronic stuff.
Either way, going slow, not doing anything abrupt and not braking while turning a corner will go a long way as well.
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