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post #1 of (permalink) Old 08-13-2010, 01:03 PM Thread Starter
Headed for the Mountains
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Abbotsford, BC, Canada.
Posts: 183
Default Mountain Hardwear Tents

Anyone had much experience with thier tents? I'm looking at the Lightpath 2 to use for weekend backpacking and some multi day excursions. I do tend to be a 4 season camper so I'm wondering about how sturdy their tents are under rough weather, and under the weight of snow.

http://www.mountainhardwear.ca/en-CA...&viewAll=False

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post #2 of (permalink) Old 08-13-2010, 02:04 PM
High on the Mountain Top
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: North Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Interest: Mountain biking, hiking, nature photography, astronomy, music...
Posts: 1,581
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I have owned and used the lightwedge 2 for several years now. It has been very sturdy and weather proof, though a little on the heavy side. Never had snow on it, but it did well in the wind. No seam issues or otherwise after a few dozen uses.
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post #3 of (permalink) Old 08-13-2010, 06:13 PM
Scaling New Heights
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: North Vancouver/Roberts Creek, BC, Canada.
Posts: 59
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I've got a MHW Viperine 2, and besides being a little damp in warm weather it's pretty good. I don't have a huge number of nights in it, about 12 or so evenly split summer/late fall, but it's a nice tight tent. I haven't had snow on it yet, since last winter was so dry.

DWK
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post #4 of (permalink) Old 08-13-2010, 07:17 PM
High on the Mountain Top
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Whitehorse, YUKON, Canada.
Posts: 2,197
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I've got the Spire 2, and I love it. I took it to Iceland last summer, and it withstood everything. Seriously, get your hands on one of these mofos.
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post #5 of (permalink) Old 08-13-2010, 10:39 PM
Off the Beaten Path
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Posts: 886
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Trango 3. Bombproof but a bit heavy. Excellent pockets inside for winter camping.
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post #6 of (permalink) Old 08-13-2010, 11:07 PM
Headed for the Mountains
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: North Vancouver, , .
Interest: Exploring BC ... preferably self propelled, self supported with free heels and a free spirit
Posts: 321
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I have the Spire 2.1 ... quite possibly the best mountaineering/traverse tent ever made. Concise, fully functional and lightweight.

Pity they don't make a 4 season version anymore.
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post #7 of (permalink) Old 08-17-2010, 12:35 PM Thread Starter
Headed for the Mountains
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Abbotsford, BC, Canada.
Posts: 183
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Thanks everyone for the feed back. Anyone used the Lightpath? Or know anyone who has?
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post #8 of (permalink) Old 08-17-2010, 12:49 PM
Scaling New Heights
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Chilliwack, BC, Canada.
Posts: 53
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I've got the Viperine 2.
A great little tent, but doubt it would fit 2 people.
No experience in rough weather, or snow, sorry.
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post #9 of (permalink) Old 08-17-2010, 05:17 PM
Headed for the Mountains
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Vancouver Island, BC, Canada.
Posts: 310
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I have had a MH Lightwedge3 for several years. MH makes a Lightwedge2 which is a bit smaller. We like to have all our hiking/climbing or bicycle touring gear in the tent with us so we got the bigger tent. LW3 has big mesh panels so if the weather is warm and dry, you can leave the fly off and gaze at the sky. As well, if you just need a sunshade, you can put up the fly only.
It is not rated as a 4 season tent, more like a 3 season tent. We've woken up to find snow plastering the fly to the tent on a few early summer trips into the mountains. On these occasions, everything inside the tent was dry and neither the tent nor the poles were damaged by the the weight of the wet snow.
We've weathered a few rain storms in it as well. On a bicycle tour in dry Queensland (Australia), we were caught in a sudden downpour so we pitched the tent to sit it out. We found that the shape of the fly was perfect for catching the rainwater in the cooking pots and cups.
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