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marmot 11-11-2003 10:11 AM

10 essentials?
 
1. Map and compass, and the knowledge of how to use both
2. Sun protection: Sunscreen, sunglasses, brimmed hat
3. Rain gear and extra clothing
4. Head lamp/flashlight with extra batteries and bulb
5. First aid kit/supplies
6. Pocket knife or Multi-Tool
7. Extra Food (in addition to your lunch/planned meals)
8. Extra water and means of water treatment
9. Fire starter (for emergency use)
10. Emergency shelter (tarp, poncho, tube tent)

How many of you carry them on every hike? If no, why not?

Me, usually nine out of 10. The emergency shelter usually doesn't come out with me for a day hike. I don't usually think about it. Maybe it's time to get a poncho and toss it in the daypack.


*****
A trip is about the journey as much, if not more than about the destination. What is the joy in reaching your destination if you've ignored everything along the way?

Alex Lowe said it best: "The best climber is the one having the most fun."

Pathfinder 11-11-2003 02:18 PM

For shelter, get a space blanket or space bag. They must weight no more than an an ounce and take up very little space. Throw one in your backpack and forget about it - until you need it of course!

BillyGoat 11-11-2003 02:35 PM

Map and compass are dependant upon where I'm going. If I'm in familiar territory with well marked routes, I'm not too concerned, but anything unfamiliar or travel above the treeline will involve map and compass. I always leave the compass in my pack anyway so I suppose I always have it.

"If you don't get at it, when you get to it, you won't get to it to get at it again!"

LongShadow 11-11-2003 02:41 PM

Just remember that if you are caught in the alpine in the storm, think twice about using your space blanket.




Hiker Boy 11-11-2003 02:47 PM

Why stop at 10? ;)

....."Know the Truth and the Truth shall set you free."

seawallrunner 11-11-2003 02:51 PM

I carry the essential 10 - without thinking of them as essential, or ten. just makes sense.

so far, never got lost or benighted, but just in case a twisted ankle happens - not that it ever has - it's good to be prepared.

former girl scout, C Wall

Ronbo 11-11-2003 03:26 PM

Outdoor Recreation Equipment Check List
How To Use This Check List
• Use the ALL TRIPS equipment list, then-
• Pick the appropriate list for your type of trip.
• Gather all your gear and-
• Check off the equipment as you put it in your pack.
• Check off the equipment you won't be taking (all items will be checked off when you are ready to
go).
• Pack all items in plastic bags so they will stay dry or won't leak.
• Group gear is to be distributed equally, taking into consideration the weight of the gear and the
ability of the person to carry it.
• Be extra conscious of weight. Go as ‘light' as possible.
• Change the lists to suit your area, personal needs or type of trip.
• Leave a route plan and ETA (estimated time of arrival) home with a responsible person and be sure
to call this person when you return.

• Have proper equipment.
• Have sufficient training or experience for the type of trip.
• Know basic First Aid, plus emergency and rescue procedures.
• Be in good physical condition
• Have a co-operative attitude.
ALL TRIPS
Wear:
#145; Suitable Clothing
#145; 1 or 2 pairs of socks
#145; Boots (appropriate for the trip)
#145; Gaiters
#145; Underwear (shorts or longs)
#145; T shirt
#145; Shirt
#145; Sweater
#145; Jacket
#145; Hat, cap or toque
#145; Sunglasses
#145; Watch
Carry on your person:
#145; Matches (in a waterproof
container)
#145; Whistle
#145; Compass
#145; Knife
#145; Emergency Kit
water-proofed matches
First Aid Kit
Emergency blanket
#145; Munchies
#145; Handkerchief
#145; Flares or Pepper Spray (bear
protector)
Car Pack: For end of trip
#145; Complete change of clothing
#145; Food
#145; Complete First Aid Kit
#145; Flashlight or lantern
#145; Toilet paper
#145; Soap & Towel
DAY HIKES
#145; Day Pack
#145; Rain Gear
#145; Food
#145; Drink
#145; Map & Compass
#145; Matches
#145; Insect Repellent
#145; Personal medication
#145; Special Gear : Camera & Film,
binoculars, I.D. books, fishing
gear etc.
EXTENDED TRIPS:
(Overnight or Several Days)
#145; Suitable Pack
#145; Sleeping Bag
#145; Ensolite or Thermarest Mattress
#145; Camp shoes
#145; Socks (2 or more pairs)
#145; Underwear (long johns?)
#145; Trousers
#145; Shirt
#145; T-Shirt
#145; Warm sweater
#145; Vest or Jacket
#145; Rain Gear
#145; Toque (for sleeping too)
#145; Flashlight
#145; Repair Kit containing: tape,
needle & thread, wire.
#145; Washcloth &Handtowel
#145; Handsoap (biodegradeable)
#145; Toothbrush & Toothpaste
#145; Toilet paper
#145; Personal medication
#145; Insect repellent
#145; Boot Treatment
#145; Matches
#145; Plate or Bowl & Cup
#145; Knife, Fork & Spoon
#145; Water Bottle
#145; First Aid Kit (with Moleskin)
#145;
Share with group:
#145; Tent and Fly
#145; Stove & Fuel
#145; Fire Starter
#145; Pots & Pans
#145; Dish Towel
#145; Dish Soap (biodegradeable)
#145; Scouring Pad
#145; Food
#145; Munchies
#145; Map
#145; Pencil & Paper
#145; Headlamp
Special Gear
#145; Camera & Film
#145; Binocular
WINTER & MOUNTAIN TRIPS:
#145; Day Hike Equipment or Extended
Trip Equipment, Plus:
#145; Extra Food
#145; Extra Fuel
#145; Extra Warm Clothing
#145; Mitts
#145; Snow goggles
#145; Sunscreen
#145; Lip Balm
#145; Snow Shovel
#145; Snow Shoes
#145; Skiis
#145; Poles
#145; Skins
#145; Wax
#145; Repair Kit containing: ski tip,
tape, wire, etc.
#145;
#145;
MOUNTAIN CLIMBING &
GLACIAL TRAVEL:
#145; Climbing Boots
#145; Helmet
#145; Crampons
#145; Harness
#145; Ice Axe
#145; Climbing Rope
#145; Runners
#145; Prusiks
#145; Jumars
#145; Carabiners
#145; Figure 8
#145; Ice Hammer
#145; Rescue pulleys
#145; Avalanche cord
#145; Ice screws
#145; Chocks
#145; Wands
#145; Pitons
#145; Pieps & Probes
#145; Altimeter
#145; Headlamp
#145; Repair Kit containg: Crampon
wrench & spare screws
CANOE TRIPS:

• Wear a PFD.
• Have suitable training for the
trip.
• Know mouth-to-mouth
resuscitation.
• Be able to swim.
#145; Day Hike Equipment or Extended
Trip Equipment, Plus:
#145; Canoe (in good repair)
#145; Extra Floatation
#145; 3 paddles per canoe
#145; Bailer & Sponge
#145; 15 ft. painters
#145; Lining ropes
#145; Canoe cover
#145; River Bag
#145; Cord (to tie items in)
#145; Repair Kit
#145; Axe or Saw
#145; Fishing gear
#145; A complete Change of clothing
#145; PFD
#145; Running Shoes
#145; Knee Pads
#145; Swim Suit
#145; Wet Suit
#145; Sun Hat
#145; Sunglasses
#145; Sunscreen
BIKE TRIPS:
#145; Day Hike Equipment or Extended
Trip Equipment, plus:
#145; Bike (in good condition)
#145; Helmet & gloves
#145; Paniers
#145; Pump
#145; Spare Tire & Tube
#145; Repair Kit containing: tire
patches, good cement, tape &
wire, chain oil, screw driver &
wrench set, chain tool, value cap
(with value remover)
OTHER GEAR & OR
REMINDERS
#145;
#145;
#145;
#145;
#145;
#145;
#145;
SPECIAL NOTES:
Put equipment inside your pack as
much as possible, tie outside gear on
securely, whether in a canoe or
travelling by bike.
For glacier travel pin mitts onto your
shirt or tie on a string through and up
your sleeves.
Sunglasses can be taped or tied onto
your head.
Catch problems early, put moleskin
on hot spots before they become
blisters.
Put raingear on before it rains. Gaiters
and chaps help keep your feet dry and
comfortable.
Have fun but remember to observe the
Principles of Low Impact Recreation:
Plan Ahead & Prepare.
Camp and Travel on Durable
Surfaces.
Pack It In, Pack It Out.
Properly Dispose of What You
Cannot Pack Out.
Leave What You Find.
Minimize Use and Impact of Fire.
Minimize Noise and Visual
Intrusion.

I am in shape. Round is a shape.

EugeneK 11-11-2003 03:44 PM

Quote:

quote:Originally posted by jhamlin

Just remember that if you are caught in the alpine in the storm, think twice about using your space blanket.
Why? Is it dangerous?
Thanks,
Eugene.

Jimbo 11-11-2003 03:54 PM

Quote:

quote:Originally posted by EugeneK

Quote:

quote:Originally posted by jhamlin

Just remember that if you are caught in the alpine in the storm, think twice about using your space blanket.
Why? Is it dangerous?
Thanks,
Eugene.
They're metalic and could attract lightning

I'd rather be hiking! https://www.clubtread.com/images/misc/footprints.gif

LongShadow 11-11-2003 03:54 PM

I've read in several of my survival books not to use them in thundershowers in alpine areas as they attract lightning - even if you are on a slope.




EugeneK 11-11-2003 04:36 PM

Thank you, that makes sense.
As to the original question, I rarely have many of those 10 essentials with me. For example, when I set out on a bright sunny day for a relatively short daytrip, I see little point in taking rain gear. Ditto for sunscreen on a cloudy day or emergency shelter on Grouse Grind. Yes, of course, a July daytrip could turn into an overnighter with snow blizzard, but what realistically are the chances of that happening? I do normally carry a GPS: IMO on the marked trail the map, compass, and GPS are equally useless; but when you get lost, a bread-crumb feature of GPS (if you've bothered to set it up) is more helpful. I do have extra water (actually, it's never 'extra'), but almost never more food than needed for the plan.
In other words, it's all about risk evaluation and acceptance. For many people the very idea of venturing off the asphalt is unacceptably risky, yet we hike.
That being said, I might change my mind after the first use of SAR services, but that's yet to happen.
Regards,
Eugene.

Pathfinder 11-11-2003 06:48 PM

Quote:

quote:
Just remember that if you are caught in the alpine in the storm, think twice about using your space blanket.
Quote:

quote:
They're metalic and could attract lightning
That makes sense. I'll file that bit of advice for future survival reference!

backpacker_029 11-11-2003 07:08 PM

Hmm, I never thought about the space blankets/lightning thing. Guess I'll remember that next time I go hiking too. I usually carry the 10 essentials, even though I never use them. But more than half the time I take everything is just when I'm out hiking somewhere farther away. It also depends on the weather conditions as Eugene said. If it's a cloudy, rainy day and I'm going hiking somewhere where I've never been before, then I'll take everything. If it's a sunny day hiking the Grind, all I'm gonna probably end up taking is water.

blah, have a cookie

ChuckLW 11-11-2003 11:59 PM

1. Map and compass, and the knowledge of how to use both
Yes (also a GPS)
2. Sun protection: Sunscreen, sunglasses, brimmed hat
Yes
3. Rain gear and extra clothing
Yes (rain gear, fleece, gloves and touque)
4. Head lamp/flashlight with extra batteries and bulb
Yes except for extra batteries and bulb: with an LED headlight the bulbs are unecessary and the batteries are good for reasonable light for about 100 hours. Also, I'm always with at least with one kid who also has their own light)
5. First aid kit/supplies
Yes
6. Pocket knife or Multi-Tool
Yes
7. Extra Food (in addition to your lunch/planned meals)
Yes
8. Extra water and means of water treatment
A little extra water. My backpacking "full on" emergency supplies include water treatment. For day hikes I don't bother. In an emergency I'm prepared to drink the water in the local hills untreated)
9. Fire starter (for emergency use)
Yes
10. Emergency shelter (tarp, poncho, tube tent)
Space blanket and a couple of big garbage bags.

Just did a day hike today with all of this as well as camera, monocular, TP, bear spray and pack cover and had lots of room to spare in my 25 litre daypack. The weight was inconsequential and I can't imagine any reason not to take this gear anywhere that could be described as wilderness or backcountry (terms that I would not apply to the Grouse Grind).

It's easy to imagine how easily all of this could become necessary. Today, just coming off the North Peak of the Stawamus Chief we overtook a couple also heading down. They had absolutely nothing with them but the clothes they were wearing (not rain gear and not particularly warm). This was at about 3pm with more than an hour of steady hiking over steep and tricky terrain between them and any hope of assistance. Sunset was 1 1/2 hours away and nobody else was anywhere near this area. All it would take would be one badly sprained ankle and the absence of basic gear could have put them in line for a Darwin Award. [XX(]

"Aging ... it beats the alternative"

LongShadow 11-12-2003 12:13 AM

Ha good one ChuckU. That's true. I always always pack my TP!!!




Kodiak 11-12-2003 12:35 AM

I would include duct tape on almost any descent trip, as it can be used from first aid purpose to repair aid.

ChuckLW 11-12-2003 01:37 AM

Quote:

quote:Originally posted by Kodiak

I would include duct tape on almost any descent trip, as it can be used from first aid purpose to repair aid.
True: I've got some wrapped around my poles for 1st aid, gear repair, you name it, duct tape can do it!

"Aging ... it beats the alternative"

BillyGoat 11-12-2003 04:25 PM

So true about a flashlight; even on a dayhike. Upon getting to the Elk Mtn trailhead Saturday night to do a night hike, SAR was just finishing up getting a family caught in the dark off the mtn...a family comprised of young kids! If they were counting on a full mooon to guide them back after sunset, OOPS....lunar eclipse! Got down to a good -5 that night, and they woulda been HOOPED if not for SAR.

"If you don't get at it, when you get to it, you won't get to it to get at it again!"

Hodgeman 11-12-2003 09:43 PM

Whistle / Signaling device.... If it's not on the list, it should be. I often encourage newbies, or those unfamilliar with the area, to carry one. In this part of the world, you don't have to step too far off the trail to be lost or separated from a group. Two way radios aren't a bad idea for a group either, with one at the front and one at the back to keep everyone accounted for.

Flashlight should go on every trip, at this time of year especially. It doesn't take much of a delay to get caught in the dark.

^^ Livin' in the 3rd dimension - Go Vertical !!

LongShadow 11-12-2003 09:55 PM

Whistle is a good idea, newbie or not. I keep one in my sidepack. If something were to happen and you beside something loud such as a creek, noone would ever hear you yelling. But a super loud whistle might stand a better chance.




marmot 11-17-2003 10:14 AM

Quote:

quote:Originally posted by Hodgeman

Whistle / Signaling device.... If it's not on the list, it should be. I often encourage newbies, or those unfamilliar with the area, to carry one. In this part of the world, you don't have to step too far off the trail to be lost or separated from a group. Two way radios aren't a bad idea for a group either, with one at the front and one at the back to keep everyone accounted for.

Flashlight should go on every trip, at this time of year especially. It doesn't take much of a delay to get caught in the dark.

^^ Livin' in the 3rd dimension - Go Vertical !!
That's a good idea, Hodge. I actually carry a whistle on my compass lanyard. Come to think of it, I've seen some lists which include the whistle as an item, and lump xtra food/water and water treatment into one item.

One thing to think about with a whistle, keep it handy (in a pocket or some place where you won't lose/drop it. Story a old SAR tech told every year in training was to keep the whistle in the pocket, or on compass lanyard worn aroudnd the neck (something I don't advocate in the brush). Story goes a search subject fell and rolled off trail into a gully. No obvious sign of where he fell/rolled. Ended up separated from his pack, whistle on the pack strap out of reach, and he was to injured to get to his pack. He sat and hollered for help until he was hoarse.

Now search teams often start with fast searches (run the trails looking for clues to narrow search areas) before getting granular in the search. Three teams passed on the trail looking for this guy. He could hear them calling him, but was so hoarse he could barely make a sound. Where he'd ended up was obscured from the trail, so they couldn't see him, even if they could see signs of where he went off the trail.

Search teams finally did find him when they started working off trail, but had his whistle been handy, he could have answered the first search team and been out of there several hours earlier.

So, a whistle is a definite. I gave Hiker Boy's kids each a really loud whistle my old SAR unit used to sell as a fund raiser. Dual chamber job.

*****
A trip is about the journey as much, if not more than about the destination. What is the joy in reaching your destination if you've ignored everything along the way?

Alex Lowe said it best: "The best climber is the one having the most fun."

19351 11-17-2003 12:13 PM

Quote:

quote:or on compass lanyard worn aroudnd the neck (something I don't advocate in the brush).
How come [?] This is something I have done from time-to-time.
Is it the hanging aspect or getting it caught on something.If its tucked into your shirt it shouldn't be a problem.
Good tip about the whistle in the pocket.If you ever loose your pack your stuck. I guess I keep mine in the pack or else I would forget to take it along.

"No Trail is Long with Good Company"

marmot 11-17-2003 02:15 PM

Quote:

quote:Originally posted by The Hiker

Quote:

quote:or on compass lanyard worn aroudnd the neck (something I don't advocate in the brush).
How come [?] This is something I have done from time-to-time.
Is it the hanging aspect or getting it caught on something.If its tucked into your shirt it shouldn't be a problem.
Good tip about the whistle in the pocket.If you ever loose your pack your stuck. I guess I keep mine in the pack or else I would forget to take it along.

"No Trail is Long with Good Company"
It is primarily the risk of getting it hung up on something and causing strangulation risk. When I say in the brush, I'm talking about off trail in areas where you're crawling over/under things. I'd get sick of stuffing the damn thing back down in my shirt! Of course, falling off a trail could put you in this situation too!

Really to each his/her own. I don't like having stuff to get hung up on things when I'm outdoors. I don't wear necklackes hiking/climbing/cycling, my wedding ring comes off to rock climb, as does my watch. Just personal preference.

*****
A trip is about the journey as much, if not more than about the destination. What is the joy in reaching your destination if you've ignored everything along the way?

Alex Lowe said it best: "The best climber is the one having the most fun."

Vance 11-17-2003 02:46 PM

I think that pocket knife should be labelled as.

KNIFE

Some swiss ary knives have lame blades.

A solid fixed blade has many many many uses.

Just look at what Rabo did in First Blood.

^^The movie might be cartoonish to some, but he did a lot of practical things with his knife.

A fixed blade and a multi-tool you USE might be good mix.

And who carries a compass justfor show??

:)

marmot 11-17-2003 03:04 PM

Vance, maybe some SAKs do have lame blades. Utility and preparedness are important here, so is portability. I know a lot of people who won't want to carry a big-ass open blade knife. I don't particularly like to. A small pocket knife does most everything I need, or will need. Personally, a good lock back buck folder would be the best knife one can carry and use. High quality blade, holds an edge really well.

If you want to carry a Ka-bar, go for it. I'll save the weight for something more worhwhile...like more food.

*****
A trip is about the journey as much, if not more than about the destination. What is the joy in reaching your destination if you've ignored everything along the way?

Alex Lowe said it best: "The best climber is the one having the most fun."

MecKid 11-17-2003 03:17 PM

I've never been in a SAR situation. But as far as knives go, I've had my Swiss Army pocket knife for the past 20 years and it is defniitely an item I never leave home without. While it would be a HUGE stretch to say that knife has saved my life on many occasions, I can confidently say that the knife has paid for itself easily.

My dad gave me a nice sheath knife for my 15th birthday. The knife is beautiful, good and sharp. But I never take it with me on any hikes. Why? It gets in the way, hanging off my belt. My Swiss Army knife on the other hand folds up nicely in its puch and I never have to worry about it.

marmot 11-17-2003 03:37 PM

Thanks for illustrating a point, MEC. Lots of people have pocket knives, honestly. Why not use what you have.

I do take an buck open blade (5-inch blade) with me. I use it cleaning fish and for cutting food (I don't like getting the pivots on my folders gummed up with food). It's stashed in with the food and cook gear. The SAK is always in my pocket, and gets used for everything else.

*****
A trip is about the journey as much, if not more than about the destination. What is the joy in reaching your destination if you've ignored everything along the way?

Alex Lowe said it best: "The best climber is the one having the most fun."

Spidergirl 11-17-2003 03:59 PM

I generally take the lot with the possible exception of sunscreen. One other item I generally take on day trips is my cel phone. I know its probably not going to work but they have been known to work for emergency calls when they wouldn't work for anything else. I got a signal to call 911 & arrange to meet a helicopter in the middle of nowhere last year. It saved a life.


The Mountains are calling and I must go. ~John Muir

twister 11-17-2003 04:56 PM

Back to the whole whistle thing MARMOT is right on the money. Most SAR people keep a whistle really handy many of our memebers keep them on the jacket zip so it is right where it is needed or in a pocket! I suggest the pee-less FOX 40 they are loud! and you can buy them in glow in the dark!

twister

shit that's gonna hurt!

Anton 11-17-2003 05:20 PM

Re: Knives
I completely agree on using small, folding knife (or supertool). Most often it will fit all the needs.
But when I go solo, especially overnight I always carry a real KNIFE. I fix it on a shoulder, to the pack strap so it doesn't get in the way. It somehow gives a great deal of self confidence. I feel like having the warm cloths and the knife alone I already have good chances of survival being everything else lost. Besides, I was raised under perception not to even question taking the knife into the woods (especially in places where people pose a bigger thread than animals).

backpacker_029 11-17-2003 05:59 PM

Anton, I think you're completely right. On day hikes, I usually just take my pocket knife with me. A lot of friends I hike with tend to take absoloutely everything with them, including a whole bunch of other things that you honestly wouldn't need ever for a day hike, like an axe[?][?] When I hike with my dad, he takes this sharp saber knife with him on pretty much any hike, except for short day hikes around here... mostly because my grandfather was once attacked by a black bear, so he keeps safe... I'm not really sure how much a knife would help in that situation but you never know. However, I take the knife when I go overnight or backpacking too, because having some sort of protection against an attack is always better than having nothing! As for whistles, I usually carry one, even when on day hikes. You never know when something like that can save your life, just by carrying something that's practically weightless.

blah, have a cookie

trailflower 11-17-2003 06:05 PM

A knife helped this guy.

http://www.canada.com/search/story.a...a-3a9eb948314d

WILLIAMS LAKE (CP) -- John Hirsch never goes anywhere without his trusty knife.

Good thing for him.

Too bad for the bear.

Hirsch was armed only with his nine-centimetre blade when a black bear attacked him in the back yard of his acreage six kilometres outside of Williams Lake.

Hirsch is still around to talk about it.

The bear's not so lucky. It was killed in the fight.

Hirsch, an avid hunter and outdoorsman, was attacked Oct. 29 while checking on the 15 turkeys he and his wife, Sharon, raised on their 7.2-hectare spread.

One minute it was turkey time; the next, full-on bear.

"He came out of nowhere,'' said Hirsch, who was about 100 metres from his house when the bear appeared.

"I can remember thinking that he's not stopping -- he's coming," said Hirsch.

"I just didn't feel I had any place to go."

As the bear began to circle him, Hirsch, 61, was determined to face it. The pair were like wary wrestlers in a ring.

"It was like a knife fight that you'd see in an old-time Western," said Hirsch, who has tried to downplay the attack locally.

The bear swatted out at him, but each time it lunged, he managed to stab it.

"I had my wits about me enough to know that I had to stay upright," he said. "Every time he lunged at me, I was able to put my knife in him."

Time was suspended.

"I couldn't tell you if the fight lasted three seconds or three minutes," Hirsch said.

Three stabs to the bear's chest and one to its neck finally did the bruin in.

It stood about five feet seven inches to Hirsch's five feet nine inches and weighed 200 pounds, according to conservation officers who inspected it.

"I can say it sure looked smaller the next morning than it did during the fight," said Hirsch, chuckling.

Even though he's trying to keep a low profile, he's been called everything from Grizzly Adams to Daniel Boone to Davy Crockett "and some other things."

The bear was in poor shape, suffering from a severed tongue and broken jaw, the conservation officer said. Its stomach was empty and it had little fat on it.

Hirsch, a retired electrical foreman at B.C. Hydro, suffered only a scratch to the top of his head and scratches to his back -- and a badly torn T-shirt.

He's thankful the bear went after him and not his grandchildren, who regularly visit.

As for the battle itself, Hirsch said it never occurred to him that he would lose to the bear. "I just felt that however long this took, I was going to come out OK," he said. "I always felt that I was at least his equal."

backpacker_029 11-17-2003 06:59 PM

Great story, trailflower... thanks for posting it! I guess in the end, it comes in really handy to have one anytime, never thought about it that way. Although I do have friends who've seen bears all over the provincial parks in this area, so it wouldn't be all that unlikely to meet up with such a wild animal in these areas too. Hearing about this kind of stuff makes me be extra careful what I put extra into my pack next time I go out hiking.

blah, have a cookie

MecKid 11-18-2003 09:49 AM

Quote:

quote:Originally posted by marmot

I do take an buck open blade (5-inch blade) with me. I use it cleaning fish and for cutting food (I don't like getting the pivots on my folders gummed up with food).
D'oh! I completely forgot about cleaning fish!!! Yes. If I know I'm going to be fishing, then nothing beats a nice fillet knife. Although my trusty Swiss Army knife is good in many situations, when it comes to cleaning a fish, there definitely are better tools in the drawer.

longhair29 11-18-2003 06:46 PM

"How many of you carry them on every hike? If no, why not?"

That's an interesting question. I've seen numerous people on popular trails that carry nothing more than a cheap Fanny Pack and a water bottle, some only an H2o bottle and many nothing at all!

I would love to have a toll booth off sorts (no $$$ involved) in the middle of Snow Lake's trail where people could volunteer their Packs for inspection of contents. I'd wager to say that 80-per cent of all the Dayhikers out there do not carry the Ten Essentials and probably half that number have never heard of them.

With all this $$$ that the U.S. Forest Service collects from that $3.00 B.S. Northwest Forest Pass from the Public, they could make some cheap signs sealed in shatterproof plastic that SHOW the Ten Essentials like a Mini-Mag Flashlight, Rain Jkt or Poncho, 1st Aid Kit, Candle and Bic Lighter, (full) Water Bottle, etc, etc. I saw one of these 'signs' at a Ranger Station near Darrington, WA and thought immmediately what an excellent idea to educate the Public. I'd also wager to bet the 'Ten Essentials-Signs' would help to reduce the number of Search & Rescue calls each year in the lower 48 States to some credible degree. People need education, and REI can't do it all.

Now that Winter is full upon us all. In my smaller Daypack I've got a home-made Candle fired Stove that takes 2-Tealight Candles and has a 20-penny nail that supports a 10-fluid ounce cup above the flame so in an emergency I can melt snow for water and then have a hot ginger tea. I also pack a half dozen chicken boulion cubes and at least 12-tealight candles all carried in a tiny bright red stuff sack.

When I go Snowshoeing soon I'll have my Whisperlite Stove, an 11-ounce gas bottle and 1-liter pot on all Dayhikes for lunch breaks and emergency use in addition to also carrying my Candle fire Stove.

I'm ordering two MEC +15 Winter Evazote Pads that I will cut one in half that'll make 2-pads each about 22" x 37" x 1/2" thick for sit pads on breaks. The second Pad will be used for Winter overnight Backpacking in conjuction with my UL Thermarest Pad.

Other Winter Essentials are insulated Booties, some sort of Bivy Shelter and/or Tarp. Reflective Thermolite Bivy Sacks are great too, one of these combined with a 3/4 length of 3/8" thick Evazote Pad and a VBL would make a great Emergency Overnight Shelter. Throw in a HEAFTY Garbage Sack to put over the foot end of the Thermolite Bivy Sack and you'd be set. Western Mnteering makes a fairly inexpensive integrated 'reflective' Vapor Barrier Liner that could be substituted for a Thermolite Bivy and used instead with a light weight and cheap 6'x8' Tarp from MEC or www.campmor.com






longhair29 11-18-2003 06:52 PM

Quote:

quote:Originally posted by longhair29

"How many of you carry them on every hike? If no, why not?"

That's an interesting question. I've seen numerous people on popular trails that carry nothing more than a cheap Fanny Pack and a water bottle, some only an H2o bottle and many nothing at all!

I would love to have a toll booth off sorts (no $$$ involved) in the middle of Snow Lake's trail where people could volunteer their Packs for inspection of contents. I'd wager to say that 80-per cent of all the Dayhikers out there do not carry the Ten Essentials and probably half that number have never heard of them.

With all this $$$ that the U.S. Forest Service collects from that $3.00 B.S. Northwest Forest Pass from the Public, they could make some cheap signs sealed in shatterproof plastic that SHOW the Ten Essentials like a Mini-Mag Flashlight, Rain Jkt or Poncho, 1st Aid Kit, Candle and Bic Lighter, (full) Water Bottle, etc, etc. I saw one of these 'signs' at a Ranger Station near Darrington, WA and thought immmediately what an excellent idea to educate the Public. I'd also wager to bet the 'Ten Essentials-Signs' would help to reduce the number of Search & Rescue calls each year in the lower 48 States to some credible degree. People need education, and REI can't do it all.

Longhair Here: CORRECTION The North West Forest Pass costs a whopping $30.00 NOT 3.00! What a waste, over half the $$$ goes to enforcing that people have the dam pass on their cars, in other words the U.S.F.S is wasting even more $$$ on law enforcement alone.



Now that Winter is full upon us all. In my smaller Daypack I've got a home-made Candle fired Stove that takes 2-Tealight Candles and has a 20-penny nail that supports a 10-fluid ounce cup above the flame so in an emergency I can melt snow for water and then have a hot ginger tea. I also pack a half dozen chicken boulion cubes and at least 12-tealight candles all carried in a tiny bright red stuff sack.

When I go Snowshoeing soon I'll have my Whisperlite Stove, an 11-ounce gas bottle and 1-liter pot on all Dayhikes for lunch breaks and emergency use in addition to also carrying my Candle fire Stove.

I'm ordering two MEC +15 Winter Evazote Pads that I will cut one in half that'll make 2-pads each about 22" x 37" x 1/2" thick for sit pads on breaks. The second Pad will be used for Winter overnight Backpacking in conjuction with my UL Thermarest Pad.

Other Winter Essentials are insulated Booties, some sort of Bivy Shelter and/or Tarp. Reflective Thermolite Bivy Sacks are great too, one of these combined with a 3/4 length of 3/8" thick Evazote Pad and a VBL would make a great Emergency Overnight Shelter. Throw in a HEAFTY Garbage Sack to put over the foot end of the Thermolite Bivy Sack and you'd be set. Western Mnteering makes a fairly inexpensive integrated 'reflective' Vapor Barrier Liner that could be substituted for a Thermolite Bivy and used instead with a light weight and cheap 6'x8' Tarp from MEC or www.campmor.com







marmot 11-19-2003 08:15 AM

Liked the post so much to post it twice, eh Longhair? LOL

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A trip is about the journey as much, if not more than about the destination. What is the joy in reaching your destination if you've ignored everything along the way?

Alex Lowe said it best: "The best climber is the one having the most fun."

MecKid 11-19-2003 12:20 PM

Alas, I can't point the finger here. I must confess [:I] that I have been guilty of heading out for a quick day hike and not bringing the essentials with me. My thinking at the time has been that b/c it is the summer that hey, nothing can go wrong.

Of course I do realize the folly of thinking like this. It is just this kind of 'outdoors adventure' that is really going to get me into trouble one day. Provided of course I continue to take day hikes like this. Me thinks that after reading this thread I'll change my habbits!

longhair29 11-23-2003 05:53 PM

"Liked the post so much to post it twice, eh Longhair? LOL"

:) Funny, no idea how that happened. LOL Oh well............

earthboundanjel 11-27-2003 03:22 PM

Between my boyfriend and myself;
Almost always hiking together and within a close range (when out of eyesight).. We carry 2 packs: A hip pack that carries all the little things you might need to pull out here or there, including easy access to first aid kit/bearspray map/compass flashlight small snacks and water, plastic rain poncho (and a few more). Things like whistles,gloves,pocket knife are attached by a shoelace to the inside of my jacket's pockets so I don't lose them and always have them on me.

We also carry a larger pack that contains our major extra's like mini survival kit (extra flashlight with battries, spaceblanket, fishing stuff, soap, water treatment teabags, hempstring,matches,lighter, condom for transporting water if needed, plastic bags,fire starter stuff and few more things) which fits into a small light material pencil case:D . The usual lunch/large snacks and stove, extra water, plastic bags, rope, water pot, extra snacks hats and clothes and such are also in there .. I'm proabably going to put a little tyvek in there too as its so light!

Most of the time, we don't need to even touch the larger pack.. but we bring it if we plan to be out more than 2 hours(return).. though we do tone it down a little on hikes that we've done repeatedly(like dam mountain).. where we stock more on a place we havent been!

kris will tell his roommates where he's headed out to and I usually call up and leave messages with a friend:"hey I'm heading out with my boyfriend hiking.. we're going such and such area.. from the book by so-and-so.. I should be back by (this time) and will call you when i get in so you know I'm not dead and lying in a ditch :)"

We've gone out hiking where we've been really not so prepared ONCE..It was a great eye opener. (We made the decision to turn back once we hit the snowline with just basic snacks, a garbage bag, and a sweater)..Though we most likely would have been allight to continue the last 1.5km, we wern't comfortable.

Turning back is a great option when you realise you're not prepared.. I've come across many people that wouldn't even think of turning around on a hike even if they were unprepared(superman ego) Maybe it's just the pride... For myself.. well.. the mountain isn't going anywhere.. there's always another day to get up and hike it!
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I'm not lost.. I just prefer the scenic route!


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