ClubTread Community

ClubTread Community (https://forums.clubtread.com/)
-   Gotta Love Gear (https://forums.clubtread.com/14-gotta-love-gear/)
-   -   10 essentials? (https://forums.clubtread.com/14-gotta-love-gear/3423-10-essentials.html)

marmot 11-11-2003 11:11 AM

10 essentials?
 
1. Map and compass, and the knowledge of how to use both
2. Sun protection: Sunscreen, sunglasses, brimmed hat
3. Rain gear and extra clothing
4. Head lamp/flashlight with extra batteries and bulb
5. First aid kit/supplies
6. Pocket knife or Multi-Tool
7. Extra Food (in addition to your lunch/planned meals)
8. Extra water and means of water treatment
9. Fire starter (for emergency use)
10. Emergency shelter (tarp, poncho, tube tent)

How many of you carry them on every hike? If no, why not?

Me, usually nine out of 10. The emergency shelter usually doesn't come out with me for a day hike. I don't usually think about it. Maybe it's time to get a poncho and toss it in the daypack.


*****
A trip is about the journey as much, if not more than about the destination. What is the joy in reaching your destination if you've ignored everything along the way?

Alex Lowe said it best: "The best climber is the one having the most fun."

Pathfinder 11-11-2003 03:18 PM

For shelter, get a space blanket or space bag. They must weight no more than an an ounce and take up very little space. Throw one in your backpack and forget about it - until you need it of course!

BillyGoat 11-11-2003 03:35 PM

Map and compass are dependant upon where I'm going. If I'm in familiar territory with well marked routes, I'm not too concerned, but anything unfamiliar or travel above the treeline will involve map and compass. I always leave the compass in my pack anyway so I suppose I always have it.

"If you don't get at it, when you get to it, you won't get to it to get at it again!"

LongShadow 11-11-2003 03:41 PM

Just remember that if you are caught in the alpine in the storm, think twice about using your space blanket.




Hiker Boy 11-11-2003 03:47 PM

Why stop at 10? ;)

....."Know the Truth and the Truth shall set you free."

seawallrunner 11-11-2003 03:51 PM

I carry the essential 10 - without thinking of them as essential, or ten. just makes sense.

so far, never got lost or benighted, but just in case a twisted ankle happens - not that it ever has - it's good to be prepared.

former girl scout, C Wall

Ronbo 11-11-2003 04:26 PM

Outdoor Recreation Equipment Check List
How To Use This Check List
• Use the ALL TRIPS equipment list, then-
• Pick the appropriate list for your type of trip.
• Gather all your gear and-
• Check off the equipment as you put it in your pack.
• Check off the equipment you won't be taking (all items will be checked off when you are ready to
go).
• Pack all items in plastic bags so they will stay dry or won't leak.
• Group gear is to be distributed equally, taking into consideration the weight of the gear and the
ability of the person to carry it.
• Be extra conscious of weight. Go as ‘light' as possible.
• Change the lists to suit your area, personal needs or type of trip.
• Leave a route plan and ETA (estimated time of arrival) home with a responsible person and be sure
to call this person when you return.

• Have proper equipment.
• Have sufficient training or experience for the type of trip.
• Know basic First Aid, plus emergency and rescue procedures.
• Be in good physical condition
• Have a co-operative attitude.
ALL TRIPS
Wear:
#145; Suitable Clothing
#145; 1 or 2 pairs of socks
#145; Boots (appropriate for the trip)
#145; Gaiters
#145; Underwear (shorts or longs)
#145; T shirt
#145; Shirt
#145; Sweater
#145; Jacket
#145; Hat, cap or toque
#145; Sunglasses
#145; Watch
Carry on your person:
#145; Matches (in a waterproof
container)
#145; Whistle
#145; Compass
#145; Knife
#145; Emergency Kit
water-proofed matches
First Aid Kit
Emergency blanket
#145; Munchies
#145; Handkerchief
#145; Flares or Pepper Spray (bear
protector)
Car Pack: For end of trip
#145; Complete change of clothing
#145; Food
#145; Complete First Aid Kit
#145; Flashlight or lantern
#145; Toilet paper
#145; Soap & Towel
DAY HIKES
#145; Day Pack
#145; Rain Gear
#145; Food
#145; Drink
#145; Map & Compass
#145; Matches
#145; Insect Repellent
#145; Personal medication
#145; Special Gear : Camera & Film,
binoculars, I.D. books, fishing
gear etc.
EXTENDED TRIPS:
(Overnight or Several Days)
#145; Suitable Pack
#145; Sleeping Bag
#145; Ensolite or Thermarest Mattress
#145; Camp shoes
#145; Socks (2 or more pairs)
#145; Underwear (long johns?)
#145; Trousers
#145; Shirt
#145; T-Shirt
#145; Warm sweater
#145; Vest or Jacket
#145; Rain Gear
#145; Toque (for sleeping too)
#145; Flashlight
#145; Repair Kit containing: tape,
needle & thread, wire.
#145; Washcloth &Handtowel
#145; Handsoap (biodegradeable)
#145; Toothbrush & Toothpaste
#145; Toilet paper
#145; Personal medication
#145; Insect repellent
#145; Boot Treatment
#145; Matches
#145; Plate or Bowl & Cup
#145; Knife, Fork & Spoon
#145; Water Bottle
#145; First Aid Kit (with Moleskin)
#145;
Share with group:
#145; Tent and Fly
#145; Stove & Fuel
#145; Fire Starter
#145; Pots & Pans
#145; Dish Towel
#145; Dish Soap (biodegradeable)
#145; Scouring Pad
#145; Food
#145; Munchies
#145; Map
#145; Pencil & Paper
#145; Headlamp
Special Gear
#145; Camera & Film
#145; Binocular
WINTER & MOUNTAIN TRIPS:
#145; Day Hike Equipment or Extended
Trip Equipment, Plus:
#145; Extra Food
#145; Extra Fuel
#145; Extra Warm Clothing
#145; Mitts
#145; Snow goggles
#145; Sunscreen
#145; Lip Balm
#145; Snow Shovel
#145; Snow Shoes
#145; Skiis
#145; Poles
#145; Skins
#145; Wax
#145; Repair Kit containing: ski tip,
tape, wire, etc.
#145;
#145;
MOUNTAIN CLIMBING &
GLACIAL TRAVEL:
#145; Climbing Boots
#145; Helmet
#145; Crampons
#145; Harness
#145; Ice Axe
#145; Climbing Rope
#145; Runners
#145; Prusiks
#145; Jumars
#145; Carabiners
#145; Figure 8
#145; Ice Hammer
#145; Rescue pulleys
#145; Avalanche cord
#145; Ice screws
#145; Chocks
#145; Wands
#145; Pitons
#145; Pieps & Probes
#145; Altimeter
#145; Headlamp
#145; Repair Kit containg: Crampon
wrench & spare screws
CANOE TRIPS:

• Wear a PFD.
• Have suitable training for the
trip.
• Know mouth-to-mouth
resuscitation.
• Be able to swim.
#145; Day Hike Equipment or Extended
Trip Equipment, Plus:
#145; Canoe (in good repair)
#145; Extra Floatation
#145; 3 paddles per canoe
#145; Bailer & Sponge
#145; 15 ft. painters
#145; Lining ropes
#145; Canoe cover
#145; River Bag
#145; Cord (to tie items in)
#145; Repair Kit
#145; Axe or Saw
#145; Fishing gear
#145; A complete Change of clothing
#145; PFD
#145; Running Shoes
#145; Knee Pads
#145; Swim Suit
#145; Wet Suit
#145; Sun Hat
#145; Sunglasses
#145; Sunscreen
BIKE TRIPS:
#145; Day Hike Equipment or Extended
Trip Equipment, plus:
#145; Bike (in good condition)
#145; Helmet & gloves
#145; Paniers
#145; Pump
#145; Spare Tire & Tube
#145; Repair Kit containing: tire
patches, good cement, tape &
wire, chain oil, screw driver &
wrench set, chain tool, value cap
(with value remover)
OTHER GEAR & OR
REMINDERS
#145;
#145;
#145;
#145;
#145;
#145;
#145;
SPECIAL NOTES:
Put equipment inside your pack as
much as possible, tie outside gear on
securely, whether in a canoe or
travelling by bike.
For glacier travel pin mitts onto your
shirt or tie on a string through and up
your sleeves.
Sunglasses can be taped or tied onto
your head.
Catch problems early, put moleskin
on hot spots before they become
blisters.
Put raingear on before it rains. Gaiters
and chaps help keep your feet dry and
comfortable.
Have fun but remember to observe the
Principles of Low Impact Recreation:
Plan Ahead & Prepare.
Camp and Travel on Durable
Surfaces.
Pack It In, Pack It Out.
Properly Dispose of What You
Cannot Pack Out.
Leave What You Find.
Minimize Use and Impact of Fire.
Minimize Noise and Visual
Intrusion.

I am in shape. Round is a shape.

EugeneK 11-11-2003 04:44 PM

Quote:

quote:Originally posted by jhamlin

Just remember that if you are caught in the alpine in the storm, think twice about using your space blanket.
Why? Is it dangerous?
Thanks,
Eugene.

Jimbo 11-11-2003 04:54 PM

Quote:

quote:Originally posted by EugeneK

Quote:

quote:Originally posted by jhamlin

Just remember that if you are caught in the alpine in the storm, think twice about using your space blanket.
Why? Is it dangerous?
Thanks,
Eugene.
They're metalic and could attract lightning

I'd rather be hiking! https://www.clubtread.com/images/misc/footprints.gif

LongShadow 11-11-2003 04:54 PM

I've read in several of my survival books not to use them in thundershowers in alpine areas as they attract lightning - even if you are on a slope.




EugeneK 11-11-2003 05:36 PM

Thank you, that makes sense.
As to the original question, I rarely have many of those 10 essentials with me. For example, when I set out on a bright sunny day for a relatively short daytrip, I see little point in taking rain gear. Ditto for sunscreen on a cloudy day or emergency shelter on Grouse Grind. Yes, of course, a July daytrip could turn into an overnighter with snow blizzard, but what realistically are the chances of that happening? I do normally carry a GPS: IMO on the marked trail the map, compass, and GPS are equally useless; but when you get lost, a bread-crumb feature of GPS (if you've bothered to set it up) is more helpful. I do have extra water (actually, it's never 'extra'), but almost never more food than needed for the plan.
In other words, it's all about risk evaluation and acceptance. For many people the very idea of venturing off the asphalt is unacceptably risky, yet we hike.
That being said, I might change my mind after the first use of SAR services, but that's yet to happen.
Regards,
Eugene.

Pathfinder 11-11-2003 07:48 PM

Quote:

quote:
Just remember that if you are caught in the alpine in the storm, think twice about using your space blanket.
Quote:

quote:
They're metalic and could attract lightning
That makes sense. I'll file that bit of advice for future survival reference!

backpacker_029 11-11-2003 08:08 PM

Hmm, I never thought about the space blankets/lightning thing. Guess I'll remember that next time I go hiking too. I usually carry the 10 essentials, even though I never use them. But more than half the time I take everything is just when I'm out hiking somewhere farther away. It also depends on the weather conditions as Eugene said. If it's a cloudy, rainy day and I'm going hiking somewhere where I've never been before, then I'll take everything. If it's a sunny day hiking the Grind, all I'm gonna probably end up taking is water.

blah, have a cookie

ChuckLW 11-12-2003 12:59 AM

1. Map and compass, and the knowledge of how to use both
Yes (also a GPS)
2. Sun protection: Sunscreen, sunglasses, brimmed hat
Yes
3. Rain gear and extra clothing
Yes (rain gear, fleece, gloves and touque)
4. Head lamp/flashlight with extra batteries and bulb
Yes except for extra batteries and bulb: with an LED headlight the bulbs are unecessary and the batteries are good for reasonable light for about 100 hours. Also, I'm always with at least with one kid who also has their own light)
5. First aid kit/supplies
Yes
6. Pocket knife or Multi-Tool
Yes
7. Extra Food (in addition to your lunch/planned meals)
Yes
8. Extra water and means of water treatment
A little extra water. My backpacking "full on" emergency supplies include water treatment. For day hikes I don't bother. In an emergency I'm prepared to drink the water in the local hills untreated)
9. Fire starter (for emergency use)
Yes
10. Emergency shelter (tarp, poncho, tube tent)
Space blanket and a couple of big garbage bags.

Just did a day hike today with all of this as well as camera, monocular, TP, bear spray and pack cover and had lots of room to spare in my 25 litre daypack. The weight was inconsequential and I can't imagine any reason not to take this gear anywhere that could be described as wilderness or backcountry (terms that I would not apply to the Grouse Grind).

It's easy to imagine how easily all of this could become necessary. Today, just coming off the North Peak of the Stawamus Chief we overtook a couple also heading down. They had absolutely nothing with them but the clothes they were wearing (not rain gear and not particularly warm). This was at about 3pm with more than an hour of steady hiking over steep and tricky terrain between them and any hope of assistance. Sunset was 1 1/2 hours away and nobody else was anywhere near this area. All it would take would be one badly sprained ankle and the absence of basic gear could have put them in line for a Darwin Award. [XX(]

"Aging ... it beats the alternative"

LongShadow 11-12-2003 01:13 AM

Ha good one ChuckU. That's true. I always always pack my TP!!!





All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:54 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.1
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2021 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2021 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome