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post #31 of (permalink) Old 11-17-2003, 05:59 PM
 
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Anton, I think you're completely right. On day hikes, I usually just take my pocket knife with me. A lot of friends I hike with tend to take absoloutely everything with them, including a whole bunch of other things that you honestly wouldn't need ever for a day hike, like an axe[?][?] When I hike with my dad, he takes this sharp saber knife with him on pretty much any hike, except for short day hikes around here... mostly because my grandfather was once attacked by a black bear, so he keeps safe... I'm not really sure how much a knife would help in that situation but you never know. However, I take the knife when I go overnight or backpacking too, because having some sort of protection against an attack is always better than having nothing! As for whistles, I usually carry one, even when on day hikes. You never know when something like that can save your life, just by carrying something that's practically weightless.

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post #32 of (permalink) Old 11-17-2003, 06:05 PM
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A knife helped this guy.

http://www.canada.com/search/story.a...a-3a9eb948314d

WILLIAMS LAKE (CP) -- John Hirsch never goes anywhere without his trusty knife.

Good thing for him.

Too bad for the bear.

Hirsch was armed only with his nine-centimetre blade when a black bear attacked him in the back yard of his acreage six kilometres outside of Williams Lake.

Hirsch is still around to talk about it.

The bear's not so lucky. It was killed in the fight.

Hirsch, an avid hunter and outdoorsman, was attacked Oct. 29 while checking on the 15 turkeys he and his wife, Sharon, raised on their 7.2-hectare spread.

One minute it was turkey time; the next, full-on bear.

"He came out of nowhere,'' said Hirsch, who was about 100 metres from his house when the bear appeared.

"I can remember thinking that he's not stopping -- he's coming," said Hirsch.

"I just didn't feel I had any place to go."

As the bear began to circle him, Hirsch, 61, was determined to face it. The pair were like wary wrestlers in a ring.

"It was like a knife fight that you'd see in an old-time Western," said Hirsch, who has tried to downplay the attack locally.

The bear swatted out at him, but each time it lunged, he managed to stab it.

"I had my wits about me enough to know that I had to stay upright," he said. "Every time he lunged at me, I was able to put my knife in him."

Time was suspended.

"I couldn't tell you if the fight lasted three seconds or three minutes," Hirsch said.

Three stabs to the bear's chest and one to its neck finally did the bruin in.

It stood about five feet seven inches to Hirsch's five feet nine inches and weighed 200 pounds, according to conservation officers who inspected it.

"I can say it sure looked smaller the next morning than it did during the fight," said Hirsch, chuckling.

Even though he's trying to keep a low profile, he's been called everything from Grizzly Adams to Daniel Boone to Davy Crockett "and some other things."

The bear was in poor shape, suffering from a severed tongue and broken jaw, the conservation officer said. Its stomach was empty and it had little fat on it.

Hirsch, a retired electrical foreman at B.C. Hydro, suffered only a scratch to the top of his head and scratches to his back -- and a badly torn T-shirt.

He's thankful the bear went after him and not his grandchildren, who regularly visit.

As for the battle itself, Hirsch said it never occurred to him that he would lose to the bear. "I just felt that however long this took, I was going to come out OK," he said. "I always felt that I was at least his equal."
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post #33 of (permalink) Old 11-17-2003, 06:59 PM
 
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Great story, trailflower... thanks for posting it! I guess in the end, it comes in really handy to have one anytime, never thought about it that way. Although I do have friends who've seen bears all over the provincial parks in this area, so it wouldn't be all that unlikely to meet up with such a wild animal in these areas too. Hearing about this kind of stuff makes me be extra careful what I put extra into my pack next time I go out hiking.

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post #34 of (permalink) Old 11-18-2003, 09:49 AM
 
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by marmot

I do take an buck open blade (5-inch blade) with me. I use it cleaning fish and for cutting food (I don't like getting the pivots on my folders gummed up with food).
D'oh! I completely forgot about cleaning fish!!! Yes. If I know I'm going to be fishing, then nothing beats a nice fillet knife. Although my trusty Swiss Army knife is good in many situations, when it comes to cleaning a fish, there definitely are better tools in the drawer.
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post #35 of (permalink) Old 11-18-2003, 06:46 PM
 
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"How many of you carry them on every hike? If no, why not?"

That's an interesting question. I've seen numerous people on popular trails that carry nothing more than a cheap Fanny Pack and a water bottle, some only an H2o bottle and many nothing at all!

I would love to have a toll booth off sorts (no $$$ involved) in the middle of Snow Lake's trail where people could volunteer their Packs for inspection of contents. I'd wager to say that 80-per cent of all the Dayhikers out there do not carry the Ten Essentials and probably half that number have never heard of them.

With all this $$$ that the U.S. Forest Service collects from that $3.00 B.S. Northwest Forest Pass from the Public, they could make some cheap signs sealed in shatterproof plastic that SHOW the Ten Essentials like a Mini-Mag Flashlight, Rain Jkt or Poncho, 1st Aid Kit, Candle and Bic Lighter, (full) Water Bottle, etc, etc. I saw one of these 'signs' at a Ranger Station near Darrington, WA and thought immmediately what an excellent idea to educate the Public. I'd also wager to bet the 'Ten Essentials-Signs' would help to reduce the number of Search & Rescue calls each year in the lower 48 States to some credible degree. People need education, and REI can't do it all.

Now that Winter is full upon us all. In my smaller Daypack I've got a home-made Candle fired Stove that takes 2-Tealight Candles and has a 20-penny nail that supports a 10-fluid ounce cup above the flame so in an emergency I can melt snow for water and then have a hot ginger tea. I also pack a half dozen chicken boulion cubes and at least 12-tealight candles all carried in a tiny bright red stuff sack.

When I go Snowshoeing soon I'll have my Whisperlite Stove, an 11-ounce gas bottle and 1-liter pot on all Dayhikes for lunch breaks and emergency use in addition to also carrying my Candle fire Stove.

I'm ordering two MEC +15 Winter Evazote Pads that I will cut one in half that'll make 2-pads each about 22" x 37" x 1/2" thick for sit pads on breaks. The second Pad will be used for Winter overnight Backpacking in conjuction with my UL Thermarest Pad.

Other Winter Essentials are insulated Booties, some sort of Bivy Shelter and/or Tarp. Reflective Thermolite Bivy Sacks are great too, one of these combined with a 3/4 length of 3/8" thick Evazote Pad and a VBL would make a great Emergency Overnight Shelter. Throw in a HEAFTY Garbage Sack to put over the foot end of the Thermolite Bivy Sack and you'd be set. Western Mnteering makes a fairly inexpensive integrated 'reflective' Vapor Barrier Liner that could be substituted for a Thermolite Bivy and used instead with a light weight and cheap 6'x8' Tarp from MEC or www.campmor.com





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post #36 of (permalink) Old 11-18-2003, 06:52 PM
 
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by longhair29

"How many of you carry them on every hike? If no, why not?"

That's an interesting question. I've seen numerous people on popular trails that carry nothing more than a cheap Fanny Pack and a water bottle, some only an H2o bottle and many nothing at all!

I would love to have a toll booth off sorts (no $$$ involved) in the middle of Snow Lake's trail where people could volunteer their Packs for inspection of contents. I'd wager to say that 80-per cent of all the Dayhikers out there do not carry the Ten Essentials and probably half that number have never heard of them.

With all this $$$ that the U.S. Forest Service collects from that $3.00 B.S. Northwest Forest Pass from the Public, they could make some cheap signs sealed in shatterproof plastic that SHOW the Ten Essentials like a Mini-Mag Flashlight, Rain Jkt or Poncho, 1st Aid Kit, Candle and Bic Lighter, (full) Water Bottle, etc, etc. I saw one of these 'signs' at a Ranger Station near Darrington, WA and thought immmediately what an excellent idea to educate the Public. I'd also wager to bet the 'Ten Essentials-Signs' would help to reduce the number of Search & Rescue calls each year in the lower 48 States to some credible degree. People need education, and REI can't do it all.

Longhair Here: CORRECTION The North West Forest Pass costs a whopping $30.00 NOT 3.00! What a waste, over half the $$$ goes to enforcing that people have the dam pass on their cars, in other words the U.S.F.S is wasting even more $$$ on law enforcement alone.



Now that Winter is full upon us all. In my smaller Daypack I've got a home-made Candle fired Stove that takes 2-Tealight Candles and has a 20-penny nail that supports a 10-fluid ounce cup above the flame so in an emergency I can melt snow for water and then have a hot ginger tea. I also pack a half dozen chicken boulion cubes and at least 12-tealight candles all carried in a tiny bright red stuff sack.

When I go Snowshoeing soon I'll have my Whisperlite Stove, an 11-ounce gas bottle and 1-liter pot on all Dayhikes for lunch breaks and emergency use in addition to also carrying my Candle fire Stove.

I'm ordering two MEC +15 Winter Evazote Pads that I will cut one in half that'll make 2-pads each about 22" x 37" x 1/2" thick for sit pads on breaks. The second Pad will be used for Winter overnight Backpacking in conjuction with my UL Thermarest Pad.

Other Winter Essentials are insulated Booties, some sort of Bivy Shelter and/or Tarp. Reflective Thermolite Bivy Sacks are great too, one of these combined with a 3/4 length of 3/8" thick Evazote Pad and a VBL would make a great Emergency Overnight Shelter. Throw in a HEAFTY Garbage Sack to put over the foot end of the Thermolite Bivy Sack and you'd be set. Western Mnteering makes a fairly inexpensive integrated 'reflective' Vapor Barrier Liner that could be substituted for a Thermolite Bivy and used instead with a light weight and cheap 6'x8' Tarp from MEC or www.campmor.com





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post #37 of (permalink) Old 11-19-2003, 08:15 AM Thread Starter
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Liked the post so much to post it twice, eh Longhair? LOL

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Alex Lowe said it best: "The best climber is the one having the most fun."
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post #38 of (permalink) Old 11-19-2003, 12:20 PM
 
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Alas, I can't point the finger here. I must confess [:I] that I have been guilty of heading out for a quick day hike and not bringing the essentials with me. My thinking at the time has been that b/c it is the summer that hey, nothing can go wrong.

Of course I do realize the folly of thinking like this. It is just this kind of 'outdoors adventure' that is really going to get me into trouble one day. Provided of course I continue to take day hikes like this. Me thinks that after reading this thread I'll change my habbits!
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post #39 of (permalink) Old 11-23-2003, 05:53 PM
 
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"Liked the post so much to post it twice, eh Longhair? LOL"

Funny, no idea how that happened. LOL Oh well............
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post #40 of (permalink) Old 11-27-2003, 03:22 PM
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Between my boyfriend and myself;
Almost always hiking together and within a close range (when out of eyesight).. We carry 2 packs: A hip pack that carries all the little things you might need to pull out here or there, including easy access to first aid kit/bearspray map/compass flashlight small snacks and water, plastic rain poncho (and a few more). Things like whistles,gloves,pocket knife are attached by a shoelace to the inside of my jacket's pockets so I don't lose them and always have them on me.

We also carry a larger pack that contains our major extra's like mini survival kit (extra flashlight with battries, spaceblanket, fishing stuff, soap, water treatment teabags, hempstring,matches,lighter, condom for transporting water if needed, plastic bags,fire starter stuff and few more things) which fits into a small light material pencil case . The usual lunch/large snacks and stove, extra water, plastic bags, rope, water pot, extra snacks hats and clothes and such are also in there .. I'm proabably going to put a little tyvek in there too as its so light!

Most of the time, we don't need to even touch the larger pack.. but we bring it if we plan to be out more than 2 hours(return).. though we do tone it down a little on hikes that we've done repeatedly(like dam mountain).. where we stock more on a place we havent been!

kris will tell his roommates where he's headed out to and I usually call up and leave messages with a friend:"hey I'm heading out with my boyfriend hiking.. we're going such and such area.. from the book by so-and-so.. I should be back by (this time) and will call you when i get in so you know I'm not dead and lying in a ditch "

We've gone out hiking where we've been really not so prepared ONCE..It was a great eye opener. (We made the decision to turn back once we hit the snowline with just basic snacks, a garbage bag, and a sweater)..Though we most likely would have been allight to continue the last 1.5km, we wern't comfortable.

Turning back is a great option when you realise you're not prepared.. I've come across many people that wouldn't even think of turning around on a hike even if they were unprepared(superman ego) Maybe it's just the pride... For myself.. well.. the mountain isn't going anywhere.. there's always another day to get up and hike it!
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I'm not lost.. I just prefer the scenic route!
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post #41 of (permalink) Old 11-27-2003, 03:40 PM
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The "pencil case" idea works really good for me:[:8]
Put everything you need into small cases, organised by what "area" of outdoor adventure it's for. Example: survival kit, mess kit, hip-kit(compass,bearspray) with first aid kit.

Once you get them stocked with what you need it's easy to keep track of your things and where they are when you need them. Back at home after each trip, go through it to see what you've used: what needs to be cleaned or replaced (like a rain poncho/teabag/firestarter for example). It's nice and convienient to keep it all in a lightweight soft container. Just grab and ready to go!

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I'm not lost.. I just prefer the scenic route!
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post #42 of (permalink) Old 06-06-2006, 01:11 PM
 
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old topic, but posting anyway ...

air horn? even louder than a whistle.

and might help against wildlife too (although i never tried it out)!



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Michael
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post #43 of (permalink) Old 06-06-2006, 02:28 PM
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I'd say its not worth the extra weight, I mean, if you want something loud that works against animals, you could always take a gun, but most wont, why? its too heavy (not to mention expensive and dangerous)

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post #44 of (permalink) Old 06-06-2006, 02:37 PM
 
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walmart sells a small air horn, smaller and lighter than your normal bear spray ...



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post #45 of (permalink) Old 06-07-2006, 06:33 PM
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The 10 essentials are not all essential all the time.
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