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post #16 of (permalink) Old 11-12-2003, 12:35 AM
 
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I would include duct tape on almost any descent trip, as it can be used from first aid purpose to repair aid.
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post #17 of (permalink) Old 11-12-2003, 01:37 AM
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by Kodiak

I would include duct tape on almost any descent trip, as it can be used from first aid purpose to repair aid.
True: I've got some wrapped around my poles for 1st aid, gear repair, you name it, duct tape can do it!

"Aging ... it beats the alternative"
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post #18 of (permalink) Old 11-12-2003, 04:25 PM
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So true about a flashlight; even on a dayhike. Upon getting to the Elk Mtn trailhead Saturday night to do a night hike, SAR was just finishing up getting a family caught in the dark off the mtn...a family comprised of young kids! If they were counting on a full mooon to guide them back after sunset, OOPS....lunar eclipse! Got down to a good -5 that night, and they woulda been HOOPED if not for SAR.

"If you don't get at it, when you get to it, you won't get to it to get at it again!"
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post #19 of (permalink) Old 11-12-2003, 09:43 PM
 
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Whistle / Signaling device.... If it's not on the list, it should be. I often encourage newbies, or those unfamilliar with the area, to carry one. In this part of the world, you don't have to step too far off the trail to be lost or separated from a group. Two way radios aren't a bad idea for a group either, with one at the front and one at the back to keep everyone accounted for.

Flashlight should go on every trip, at this time of year especially. It doesn't take much of a delay to get caught in the dark.

^^ Livin' in the 3rd dimension - Go Vertical !!
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post #20 of (permalink) Old 11-12-2003, 09:55 PM
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Whistle is a good idea, newbie or not. I keep one in my sidepack. If something were to happen and you beside something loud such as a creek, noone would ever hear you yelling. But a super loud whistle might stand a better chance.



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post #21 of (permalink) Old 11-17-2003, 10:14 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by Hodgeman

Whistle / Signaling device.... If it's not on the list, it should be. I often encourage newbies, or those unfamilliar with the area, to carry one. In this part of the world, you don't have to step too far off the trail to be lost or separated from a group. Two way radios aren't a bad idea for a group either, with one at the front and one at the back to keep everyone accounted for.

Flashlight should go on every trip, at this time of year especially. It doesn't take much of a delay to get caught in the dark.

^^ Livin' in the 3rd dimension - Go Vertical !!
That's a good idea, Hodge. I actually carry a whistle on my compass lanyard. Come to think of it, I've seen some lists which include the whistle as an item, and lump xtra food/water and water treatment into one item.

One thing to think about with a whistle, keep it handy (in a pocket or some place where you won't lose/drop it. Story a old SAR tech told every year in training was to keep the whistle in the pocket, or on compass lanyard worn aroudnd the neck (something I don't advocate in the brush). Story goes a search subject fell and rolled off trail into a gully. No obvious sign of where he fell/rolled. Ended up separated from his pack, whistle on the pack strap out of reach, and he was to injured to get to his pack. He sat and hollered for help until he was hoarse.

Now search teams often start with fast searches (run the trails looking for clues to narrow search areas) before getting granular in the search. Three teams passed on the trail looking for this guy. He could hear them calling him, but was so hoarse he could barely make a sound. Where he'd ended up was obscured from the trail, so they couldn't see him, even if they could see signs of where he went off the trail.

Search teams finally did find him when they started working off trail, but had his whistle been handy, he could have answered the first search team and been out of there several hours earlier.

So, a whistle is a definite. I gave Hiker Boy's kids each a really loud whistle my old SAR unit used to sell as a fund raiser. Dual chamber job.

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post #22 of (permalink) Old 11-17-2003, 12:13 PM
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Quote:
quoter on compass lanyard worn aroudnd the neck (something I don't advocate in the brush).
How come [?] This is something I have done from time-to-time.
Is it the hanging aspect or getting it caught on something.If its tucked into your shirt it shouldn't be a problem.
Good tip about the whistle in the pocket.If you ever loose your pack your stuck. I guess I keep mine in the pack or else I would forget to take it along.

"No Trail is Long with Good Company"
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post #23 of (permalink) Old 11-17-2003, 02:15 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by The Hiker

Quote:
quoter on compass lanyard worn aroudnd the neck (something I don't advocate in the brush).
How come [?] This is something I have done from time-to-time.
Is it the hanging aspect or getting it caught on something.If its tucked into your shirt it shouldn't be a problem.
Good tip about the whistle in the pocket.If you ever loose your pack your stuck. I guess I keep mine in the pack or else I would forget to take it along.

"No Trail is Long with Good Company"
It is primarily the risk of getting it hung up on something and causing strangulation risk. When I say in the brush, I'm talking about off trail in areas where you're crawling over/under things. I'd get sick of stuffing the damn thing back down in my shirt! Of course, falling off a trail could put you in this situation too!

Really to each his/her own. I don't like having stuff to get hung up on things when I'm outdoors. I don't wear necklackes hiking/climbing/cycling, my wedding ring comes off to rock climb, as does my watch. Just personal preference.

*****
A trip is about the journey as much, if not more than about the destination. What is the joy in reaching your destination if you've ignored everything along the way?

Alex Lowe said it best: "The best climber is the one having the most fun."
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post #24 of (permalink) Old 11-17-2003, 02:46 PM
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I think that pocket knife should be labelled as.

KNIFE

Some swiss ary knives have lame blades.

A solid fixed blade has many many many uses.

Just look at what Rabo did in First Blood.

^^The movie might be cartoonish to some, but he did a lot of practical things with his knife.

A fixed blade and a multi-tool you USE might be good mix.

And who carries a compass justfor show??


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post #25 of (permalink) Old 11-17-2003, 03:04 PM Thread Starter
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Vance, maybe some SAKs do have lame blades. Utility and preparedness are important here, so is portability. I know a lot of people who won't want to carry a big-ass open blade knife. I don't particularly like to. A small pocket knife does most everything I need, or will need. Personally, a good lock back buck folder would be the best knife one can carry and use. High quality blade, holds an edge really well.

If you want to carry a Ka-bar, go for it. I'll save the weight for something more worhwhile...like more food.

*****
A trip is about the journey as much, if not more than about the destination. What is the joy in reaching your destination if you've ignored everything along the way?

Alex Lowe said it best: "The best climber is the one having the most fun."
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post #26 of (permalink) Old 11-17-2003, 03:17 PM
 
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I've never been in a SAR situation. But as far as knives go, I've had my Swiss Army pocket knife for the past 20 years and it is defniitely an item I never leave home without. While it would be a HUGE stretch to say that knife has saved my life on many occasions, I can confidently say that the knife has paid for itself easily.

My dad gave me a nice sheath knife for my 15th birthday. The knife is beautiful, good and sharp. But I never take it with me on any hikes. Why? It gets in the way, hanging off my belt. My Swiss Army knife on the other hand folds up nicely in its puch and I never have to worry about it.
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post #27 of (permalink) Old 11-17-2003, 03:37 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for illustrating a point, MEC. Lots of people have pocket knives, honestly. Why not use what you have.

I do take an buck open blade (5-inch blade) with me. I use it cleaning fish and for cutting food (I don't like getting the pivots on my folders gummed up with food). It's stashed in with the food and cook gear. The SAK is always in my pocket, and gets used for everything else.

*****
A trip is about the journey as much, if not more than about the destination. What is the joy in reaching your destination if you've ignored everything along the way?

Alex Lowe said it best: "The best climber is the one having the most fun."
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post #28 of (permalink) Old 11-17-2003, 03:59 PM
 
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I generally take the lot with the possible exception of sunscreen. One other item I generally take on day trips is my cel phone. I know its probably not going to work but they have been known to work for emergency calls when they wouldn't work for anything else. I got a signal to call 911 & arrange to meet a helicopter in the middle of nowhere last year. It saved a life.


The Mountains are calling and I must go. ~John Muir
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post #29 of (permalink) Old 11-17-2003, 04:56 PM
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Back to the whole whistle thing MARMOT is right on the money. Most SAR people keep a whistle really handy many of our memebers keep them on the jacket zip so it is right where it is needed or in a pocket! I suggest the pee-less FOX 40 they are loud! and you can buy them in glow in the dark!

twister

shit that's gonna hurt!
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post #30 of (permalink) Old 11-17-2003, 05:20 PM
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Re: Knives
I completely agree on using small, folding knife (or supertool). Most often it will fit all the needs.
But when I go solo, especially overnight I always carry a real KNIFE. I fix it on a shoulder, to the pack strap so it doesn't get in the way. It somehow gives a great deal of self confidence. I feel like having the warm cloths and the knife alone I already have good chances of survival being everything else lost. Besides, I was raised under perception not to even question taking the knife into the woods (especially in places where people pose a bigger thread than animals).
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