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post #1 of (permalink) Old 08-06-2008, 02:40 PM Thread Starter
Hittin' the Trails
 
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Default putting up a tarp

Not sure that this is really a club tread question, but here it goes. Does anyone have experience in setting up tarps such as a siltarp, mec guide tarp et? In particular, setting up in a relatively treeless area and using a tarp pole. Last weekend we were car camping and I brought along our guide tarp and a 7' tarp pole. We had one tree to work with, and using the tarp pole we managed to get the tarp up and cover a small area. Overall it was kind of tricky and I'm just wondering if it's worth keeping a $50 pole for the odd time that I can (1/2 ass) use it. Anyone else use these poles and find them nice to have?

thanks
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post #2 of (permalink) Old 08-06-2008, 07:56 PM
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I've also used trekking poles lashed together as a tarp pole. this is a real hand when the trees aren't exactly where you want them. we have a larger tarp and tarp pole for car camping. having really long rope also helps.
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post #3 of (permalink) Old 08-06-2008, 08:43 PM Thread Starter
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yeah, I had some long cord but I'm thinking about getting a couple of 20m lengths.
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post #4 of (permalink) Old 08-06-2008, 09:25 PM
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by sluggo

yeah, I had some long cord but I'm thinking about getting a couple of 20m lengths.
I use my roof rack as a point too sometimes.
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post #5 of (permalink) Old 08-07-2008, 07:09 AM
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Personally, I'd never carry the weight of a dedicated 'tarp pole'! I use my trekking poles if there is nothing else available.



I usually carry one or two 20m lengths of 3mm rope/cord or 3/16 braided nylon rope(mostly used for a ridge line and hanging my food), along with multiple lengths of braided parachute cord, for tie off the corners/sides. I also carry an extra 6 tent stakes to anchor to, if there are no available trees/roots/large downed branches, or large rocks nearby.
If there is the odd tree around, but not enough(or properly placed), I'll tie of one end of a ridge line to it, either by tossing a rope over an appropriate branch, or using a trekking pole to slide/push a 'loop' up the trunk of a tree, as high as possible and then use either a large branch/pole to use as another point to tie off to and anchor that branch/pole of by using more cord/rope and a couple of tent stakes.



or, I'll use my trekking poles




I usually always carry a tarp with me, to provide extra 'living space' during inclement weather, or as a sun shade, for cooking. They are great places for a small group to just 'hang out' under.

Dusty
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post #6 of (permalink) Old 08-07-2008, 07:16 AM
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Dusty your example looks so perfect, barely any wrinkles, and perfect angles etc.
I took note of that in a previous report you did.



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post #7 of (permalink) Old 08-07-2008, 10:07 AM
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If you're interested in carrying poles either way, it's definitely beneficial. If you don't normally, well maybe it's not way for you. The silicone tarps are great if you need to set up a makeshift shelter unexpectedly. It may not be lavish, but it'll be useful at times. I would give it another shot and see if it's any better
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post #8 of (permalink) Old 08-07-2008, 11:35 AM
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by AcesHigh

Dusty your example looks so perfect, barely any wrinkles, and perfect angles etc.
I took note of that in a previous report you did.
Aces, it's relatively easy to set a 'wrinkle free' tarp, by putting enough 'tension' in the set-up of the tarp.

I accomplish this quickly and easily, by using a modified truckers hitch, which I show how to tie, in my little video on easy to tie knots.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r2fdTtKuQRE

Once you get the hang of tying those knots, things become much quicker/easier!
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post #9 of (permalink) Old 08-07-2008, 12:40 PM
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I've done it with 4 trekking poles and no trees around - just driftwood, etc for anchors. I don't know how you could do it with just one pole.
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post #10 of (permalink) Old 08-07-2008, 12:54 PM
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Cool Video Dusty! Informative.




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post #11 of (permalink) Old 08-07-2008, 02:53 PM Thread Starter
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here is our setup from the weekend. 1 rope to the only tree, one tarp pole, and marginal staking to the gravel ground. hiking poles typically only extend 140cm, which would make for a very low tarp.

From my brief experience, the tarp pole allows for some marginal shelter in otherwise difficult conditions. Maybe we could have used wood though, in which case the purchase of a tarp pole gets quite dubious. I'm just not sure if I can get $50 worth out of this pole.

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post #12 of (permalink) Old 08-07-2008, 03:26 PM
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Or simply find a spot that's pre-set for a Tarp. Like on the beach at Cape Scott:

The only ropes we used were to tie the corners and edges down (eight short pieces). The main top rope was already present as was the structure around it.
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post #13 of (permalink) Old 08-07-2008, 03:32 PM
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Dang, Dusty Boots, that video makes me want to practice those knots!!! Gotta get out of this office....

Thanks!
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post #14 of (permalink) Old 08-12-2008, 01:02 PM
 
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Great tutorial! Easy but very secure. Thanks very much!
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