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post #1 of (permalink) Old 06-17-2007, 10:06 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
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Default survival kit

The boy scout "be prepared" thing that I remember my dad saying when I was a kid has come back to haunt me now that I'm taking on all day hikes. (More so now, after a hiking partner and I almost risked getting stranded when bad conditions hit this last weekend on a hike , and we soon found that we really were not prepared even for an over-nighter should something worse have happened).

I hit MEC today, but found that thing were sadly lacking for putting together any sort of survivor kit [V].

Any recommendations of things I should be carying and where I might be able to get then in Vancouver? (I couldn't even find the emergency saw wire that I remember scouts getting)... ok, leatherman, emergency thermal blanket, compass, flagging tape, flashlight, and small first aid kit are covered... anything else?
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post #2 of (permalink) Old 06-17-2007, 10:13 PM
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Hmmm, I've see the wire saws there before. The usual wisdom is to start with the 10 essentials. http://www.adventuresmart.ca/ has some good info.
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post #3 of (permalink) Old 06-17-2007, 10:46 PM
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I always seem to have trouble replacing what I use out of my first aid kit. I think I remember MEC used to have just loose first aid items that you could add to a pack but they don't anymore. Where do you think I can find that kind of stuff?
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post #4 of (permalink) Old 06-17-2007, 10:51 PM
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The "10 essentials" are over rated. It totally depends on how far out you will be and what you are doing. Leathermans are a waste of weight. Most things can be improvised with a good head. If you're on marked well worn trails that are not far out a compass is not neccessary. Anything you can cut with one of those wire saws can be broken with leverage most of the time yada yada yada.

Of course the SAR guys will disagree, but [u]most</u> (not all) of their time seems to be rescuing idiots who get in over their head. You can't cure stupid with a "kit" eh.

That's my opinion anyway
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post #5 of (permalink) Old 06-17-2007, 10:55 PM Thread Starter
 
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quote:Originally posted by Summit Seeker

I always seem to have trouble replacing what I use out of my first aid kit. I think I remember MEC used to have just loose first aid items that you could add to a pack but they don't anymore. Where do you think I can find that kind of stuff?
I know what you mean! some of the stuff I've been finding here and there amoung different pharmacies (the antiseptic swabs I found at Shoppers Drug Mart)... but I can't find the wound cleaning pads anywhere.
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post #6 of (permalink) Old 06-17-2007, 10:59 PM
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I find hiking solo, I need to carry more with me when I know my day hike is going to be all day long; into the late evening hours. If being able to go with more than one, the stuff gets spread between everyone. Why take 5 wire saws for five people, unless opening a deforesting business. So many of us won't share info when hiking in a group. When I hike with a local senior group, they are staunchly sticking to their list of items; period!! They could care less that there are five hatchets, 8 cell phones, 6 walkie talkies, 3 pounds of batteries, and such between us all. If we are not going to seperate, Why not get an inventory and let's all move on?
NOPE! What is in my pack is personal and show up at a hike like one lady did with dishsoap to wash the dishes later on in a stream. Non biodegradable. she had a freakin' big bottle of DAWN! Too funny.
Totin' all that weight?

So, in a group, take inventory at the parking lot. Is there something that is communal? For instance, 8 rolls of TP?
The one with the most active metabo system should carry that and share? Well?
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post #7 of (permalink) Old 06-17-2007, 11:06 PM Thread Starter
 
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quote:Originally posted by time2clmb

Leathermans are a waste of weight. Most things can be improvised with a good head. If you're on marked well worn trails that are not far out a compass is not neccessary.
lol... on the contrary... a leatherman is a girl's best friend! I totally love the two that I have -- there's always one stuffed in whatever bag I'm carying, and it comes in handy so many times, even around the city and office [8D]

I'm afraid that I'm starting to trek out into poorly marked trails... something I started doing a few years back in Maui -- just choose a valley or a peak, then see what you can discover [:I]... I'm not "so" reckless here , but after a month of hiking like that, its kinda hard to not have the mentality of "well, the end is at the top, and as long as we're heading up, we don't have to worry about getting lost".

Compass would have been handy this last weekend, because we got caught in fog as thick as pea soup out on the snow line... we couldn't even see the trail poles when trying to back track, and started search for footprints for the next 1/2 hour to turn back ... hehe, there was a reason why the trail was closed afterall [:I]

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post #8 of (permalink) Old 06-17-2007, 11:07 PM
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by time2clmb

You can't cure stupid with a "kit" eh.
Hehehehehe...so funny, and so true!

My "essential" kit will change with each outing. Basically, I ensure that I am able to spend THE NIGHT in the wilderness. Some food, some water, First Aid kit, two (or three) methods of starting a fire, some warm clothing and some sort of shelter (garbage bag, small tarp or similar), GRS radio and cell-phone.
It is rare for me to [u]not</u> be within 8 hours of help, and I always leave a travel-plan so that SAR will know where to look.
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post #9 of (permalink) Old 06-18-2007, 12:11 AM
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Shan

Hey I would really suggest the book by Cody Lundin "98.6 the art of keeping your ass alive".

It focus on a survival kit and is a really cheap but a great survival kit.

It is also endorsed by NASAR (American search and rescue) I think that he does the best job on this topic by a long shot.

He suggests cotton balls in vasaline and it works like a hot dam.

I carry a heavy duty Space blanket and it is VERY handy to have: Shelter, water collection, poncho, toboggan, seating pad,signaling devise all rolled into one.

Learn to use a compass and map.

Fox 40 whistle

Use it BEFORE having to need it. Practice this stuff.

Everyone has there own idea of what they need, I think that this would be a good book to start from.

But the biggest thing to have in your survival kit is your brain!

Oliver

SAR 6 years
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post #10 of (permalink) Old 06-18-2007, 12:15 AM
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Quote:
quote:Any recommendations of things I should be carying and where I might be able to get then in Vancouver? (I couldn't even find the emergency saw wire that I remember scouts getting)... ok, leatherman, emergency thermal blanket, compass, flagging tape, flashlight, and small first aid kit are covered... anything else?
TheShadow hit on a good one: 2-3 forms of fire starter. I have a couple of tea candles in my kit which help to get things going. The kit should be a container which you can use as a pot or bowl.

First aid replenishing: Check out SOS safety Technologies in Richmond. They have offices across the country.
For Vancouverwww.sostech.ca
For additional offices: www.sostechnologiescanada.ca

The ten essentials which you can tailor to be lightweight and not redundant
http://www.northshorerescue.com/whattobring.html
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post #11 of (permalink) Old 06-18-2007, 01:07 AM
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Quote:
quote:Of course the SAR guys will disagree, but most (not all) of their time seems to be rescuing idiots who get in over their head. You can't cure stupid with a "kit" eh.
No I think they share and feel that frustration T2C especially when things start going bad. It just doesn't make good public relations to be calling people stupid and idiots when you're trying to garner support and raise funding. It's a matter of education. Under NSR's 10 essentials there is additional information that suggests equipment does not replace knowledge, practice, experience, and insight into your surroundings and ability.

In short: what you said

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post #12 of (permalink) Old 06-18-2007, 06:33 AM
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I agree with the fire starter idea...

I carry one of those magnesium/flint things... $8 from Wal-Mart... only wieghs a couple ounces...

C'Jack...
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post #13 of (permalink) Old 06-18-2007, 07:50 PM Thread Starter
 
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Hey guys, thanks for the tips! definitely helpful ^_^
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post #14 of (permalink) Old 06-18-2007, 10:42 PM
 
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I sure have been glad to have packed my headlamp a couple of times when we were all SURE we'd be back HOURS before dark. It has actually saved me from having to use the rest of the overnight survival kit.
Its the one thing we ask about now, just as we leave the defined trail for some extended bushwhacking "You've got your headlamp, right?" which can get some funny looks at 9am on a planned three-hour-tour.
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post #15 of (permalink) Old 06-18-2007, 10:52 PM
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I have a ziplock bag that contains my first aid kit, emergency poncho, space blanket, storm matches (great things from REI, I've started them after dunking both the match and the striker, and it still lit easly, and can't be blown out), lighter, pocket knife, 2nd skin tea light and advil. ziplock bag is great because I can see what I'm looking for, and I always know I have that stuff when I go for a hike. its always in my pack and has been very useful on much more than one occasion
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