Keeping feet dry in wet boots - ClubTread Community

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post #1 of (permalink) Old 04-13-2005, 09:03 PM Thread Starter
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Default Keeping feet dry in wet boots

My boots leak. The leather itself is cracked, and my feet have worn through the gore liner long ago.

My question is, seeing as how I don't want to go out and buy new boots, how can I keep my feet dry and warm (or at least warm) on a trip that will run a few days? I'll be tromping about in snow so there's no doubt my feet will be wet within a half hour of setting out. And there will be no possibility of drying my boots out.

I think I'll wrap my feet in plastic bags while I'm wearing the boots, and change footwear and socks while in camp? Anyone have any other thoughts or suggestions?

Is there a treatment that repairs cracked leather? I tried shoe goo but I have found that to be useless.
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post #2 of (permalink) Old 04-13-2005, 09:11 PM
 
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Quote:
quote:Is there a treatment that repairs cracked leather? I tried shoe goo but I have found that to be useless
Go heavy on the duck tape wrap [^] That stuff is the shizznit lol
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post #3 of (permalink) Old 04-13-2005, 09:14 PM
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shoegoo's made for runner material. perhaps it could be used a little to fill in the cracks before liberally duct taping? I do not own, but have heard of waterproof/breatheable socks, which you should be able to wear through a stream and emerge with warm dry feet. i cann't assist you in finding these, but supposedly they exist, and would probably do you well.
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post #4 of (permalink) Old 04-13-2005, 09:28 PM
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by Rachelo

shoegoo's made for runner material. perhaps it could be used a little to fill in the cracks before liberally duct taping? I do not own, but have heard of waterproof/breatheable socks, which you should be able to wear through a stream and emerge with warm dry feet. i cann't assist you in finding these, but supposedly they exist, and would probably do you well.
I think your talking about "aqua sock" which are fairly easy to find...


If your just wanting to stay warm, socks made out of "water friendly" material such as wool are great. They retain heat even when completely wet... another option that might work is ski socks...
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post #5 of (permalink) Old 04-13-2005, 09:31 PM
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You might want to look at this topic too, although i dont know how useful they are...

https://clubtread.com/sforum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=10610

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post #6 of (permalink) Old 04-13-2005, 09:32 PM
 
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If your ankles are strong and depending on terrain you may consider wearing trail runners. Your feet will get wet but they dry out faster than heavy boots. My old leather boots (Retired a couple weeks ago) got so wet on a rainy day last summer that I had to wring out my socks at our turn around stop. I hiked back listening to sloshing for three hours and when I took them off at the truck large pieces of skin came off! It took weeks for my feet to fully recover. If that had been a multi day trip it would have done serious damage. One more thing to consider (not cheap but cheaper than new boots) is Gore Tex socks. I've never had a pair but used to know a guy who swears by them. Good Luck.
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post #7 of (permalink) Old 04-13-2005, 09:32 PM
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My boots are slightly past their prime too, and I've been wearing Sealskinz for a while now. They do a pretty decent job of keeping the feet warm and dry - and they're breathable too. I still find my feet get a little damp from perspiration, but not too bad. Light wool socks against the skin and sealskinz as an outer layer seems to work well and be pretty comfy.

They're about $50 a pair, btw.
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post #8 of (permalink) Old 04-13-2005, 09:41 PM
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Take a look at Billy Goats' feet in 'Camping Fashion 2003'. Gortex socks just might just be the way to go.
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post #9 of (permalink) Old 04-13-2005, 10:07 PM
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by blackfly

My boots leak. The leather itself is cracked, and my feet have worn through the gore liner long ago.

My question is, seeing as how I don't want to go out and buy new boots, how can I keep my feet dry and warm (or at least warm) on a trip that will run a few days? I'll be tromping about in snow so there's no doubt my feet will be wet within a half hour of setting out. And there will be no possibility of drying my boots out.

I think I'll wrap my feet in plastic bags while I'm wearing the boots, and change footwear and socks while in camp? Anyone have any other thoughts or suggestions?

Is there a treatment that repairs cracked leather? I tried shoe goo but I have found that to be useless.
Blackfly, I hate to sound like your mother, but here goes: You need new boots! Your feet are what you walk on everyday. Treat them well. This is not the place to skimp.

If you insist on walking around with bad boots you could get yourself in trouble. What if the boots completely give out halfway through a multi-day hike? If the sole comes away from the boot or if one of the leather cracks opens up to become a hole, you could find yourself in a very difficult and potentially dangerous situation.

A waterproof sock will not help your foot against a hole letting in snow. You cannot seriously expect to walk about for a few days with plastic bags on your feet. They will be wet through with perspiration within half an hour, if it takes that long. Why would you subject yourself to that kind of discomfort? The more wet the skin around your feet is, the more susceptible you are to blisters, not a happy prospect!

I know this is lecturing but you really need to take good care of your feet. They deserve TLC!

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post #10 of (permalink) Old 04-13-2005, 10:10 PM
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What Red said. And this time, keep treating your boots nice. Seam seal the outer seams when they are new from the box, THEN sno-seal the hell out of them and keep re applying it after every major trip. Also, forget about the Gore tex liner, as you may have noticed, if the boot leaks, the liner won't help, and in fact just keeps the feet damp.
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post #11 of (permalink) Old 04-13-2005, 10:19 PM
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Don't listen to what my gf (Red) has to say...she just likes to shop for new shoes... [}] Just get yourself a G-Tec Granger's Fabric & Leather Protector from MEC. It's pretty cheap and makes your leather boots pretty waterproof. I used them on my boots and it works surprisingly well. Also, bring with you some waterproof socks in case they do leak through and you'll be fine. If the boots are still comfortable and don't cause you any pains, why replace them?

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post #12 of (permalink) Old 04-14-2005, 07:53 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the replies everyone. I think I'll go with goretex socks for now. I know I need to replace those boots, and I will do that soon. The only problem with them is that they leak. Otherwise, they give good support, are comfortable and aren't close to falling apart yet.

I will definitely pass on the goretex liner in the boots next time around.

Nice lecture, Red! You sure you aren't really my Mom checking in on me?![)]
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post #13 of (permalink) Old 04-14-2005, 08:19 AM
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As another option you can also buy those feet warmer pads and put them in your boots while you're at camp and overnight. Helps to take the moisture out and feet warm and you won't end up with frozen boots in the morning. On the Clerf trip my boots got wet on the inside from all the postholing and Exy suggested I do what I just mentioned. Worked great! Kept my feet relatively warm around camp and helped to dry my boots out somewhat overnight. Just put the feet warmers in the boots and stuff them with a shirt or something to keep the warmth in. Get a couple of pairs @ a couple of bucks each and you're good to go!. Another small & cheap alternative that should help you out a bit.
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post #14 of (permalink) Old 04-14-2005, 08:47 AM
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My 1 yo Zamberlan boots gave me wet feet on the wet, slushy trail up to Petgill a few weeks back. MEC has offered to check them out, but we decided to try waterproofing them with what they came with, hydrobloc. I still got a wet foot on the way to Eaton when I dipped my boot into the creek.

We'll do a test in the sink and see what happens. My previous boots only lasted a year before I started getting wet feet.
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post #15 of (permalink) Old 04-14-2005, 09:29 AM
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"...The only problem with them is that they leak. ..."

Chris, sounds like a considerable problem when wandering in the snow & slush for days! I'm with Mother Red. Cold, wet feet = misery.

I find night to be the worst of it. During the day, just wear good wool socks and deal with having wet feet (once the duct tape and goop give in).

You could try gortex socks while hiking, but in my experience, they are not that robust and they'd be best saved for the night: at camp, put on warm dry socks and protect them from your wet boots with the gortex socks (or 2nd best, plastic bags).

Ideally you'd have a day-pair and a night-pair of gortex socks. Alternatively, you could take down booties for night so that you're not having to keep the hiking boots on. But, if you'd need to buy the socks & booties, it's as expensive as new boots.

Last year, in perfectly good boots, I forgot my gaiters. In days of rain & snow my feet were soaked full-time from my own run-off; so, also bring gaiters.

Have fun, P.

p.s. What size are your feet?
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