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post #1 of (permalink) Old 07-15-2018, 12:28 AM Thread Starter
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Default Differences on trail and in camp

We did our first 2-night-trail in canada and I was a little bit surprised. Some examples:



The first impression was that only few people said hello on the trail when meeting other hikers. The second was in the evening when everybody was preparing dinner. People of different groups did not talk to people from other groups they did not even greet each other. And nobody offered free seats to the people coming to the cooking area (not only to us).



We found it strange but maybe thatīs totally common in Canada. I always thought that we Germans were reserved, inaccesssible or rude but I really felt strange there.
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post #2 of (permalink) Old 07-15-2018, 08:26 AM
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We did our first 2-night-trail in canada and I was a little bit surprised. Some examples:
The first impression was that only few people said hello on the trail when meeting other hikers. The second was in the evening when everybody was preparing dinner. People of different groups did not talk to people from other groups they did not even greet each other. And nobody offered free seats to the people coming to the cooking area (not only to us).
We found it strange but maybe thatīs totally common in Canada. I always thought that we Germans were reserved, inaccesssible or rude but I really felt strange there.
It all depends on the person's personality. I've lived in BC all my life and noticed that some say hello and some don't. When both men and women are hiking along the trail, it's usually the guy which says hello only. I noticed that most older folks say hello whether male or female. Also, in more isolated areas where there are few hikers, people usually say hi but on popular trails where you come across people so often hiking in groups they are busy chatting away amongst themselves that they don't saying hi. Some people just like to be left alone which is hard to do on busy trails. You don't get the same outdoor experience with hordes of people on some trails. I've come across Germans hiking in Wells Gray Park quite frequently. I find they are no different.
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post #3 of (permalink) Old 07-15-2018, 01:36 PM
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Agreed with solo75. Behavior can not be pinned to nationality or geographic location. It is quite simple in fact. Do you say "hi" to everyone walking on busy street in Munchen or Dortmund? This is what Berg Lake trail in summer is. It is also why I recommend everyone to stay away from major Rockies trails in July/August. Second factor is annoyance -- you go to nature to escape 'civilization' and instead have to fight human hordes -- such as intolerant kids at Kinney campground as you reported etc.



When I am on 10 hour hike up some peak & see maybe 1 or 2 groups whole day I will always smile, say "hi" and do a small chat. When I am on busy trail with swarms of hikers I will zone out even if it appears rude.
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post #4 of (permalink) Old 07-15-2018, 03:02 PM
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When I did the trail in early June there were very few people along the whole length of the trail, maybe met 30 people total. I said hello to all and all smiled back and replied hello as well, if there were 30 people within a small stretch it would definitely have been different. Don't think this is a 'Canadian' or 'German' thing but simply the human condition. Kinda like how everyone is generally friendlier in a small town but in the big city people keep to themselves or group
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post #5 of (permalink) Old 07-15-2018, 03:42 PM
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Originally Posted by kossi View Post
We did our first 2-night-trail in canada and I was a little bit surprised. Some examples:



The first impression was that only few people said hello on the trail when meeting other hikers. The second was in the evening when everybody was preparing dinner. People of different groups did not talk to people from other groups they did not even greet each other. And nobody offered free seats to the people coming to the cooking area (not only to us).



We found it strange but maybe thatīs totally common in Canada. I always thought that we Germans were reserved, inaccesssible or rude but I really felt strange there.

and you were exactly where???
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post #6 of (permalink) Old 07-16-2018, 01:20 AM
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One of the great pleasures I have of hiking in BC and Alberta, especially in more remote areas, are the friendly hikers I sometimes meet and chat with. If I am hiking close to major cities like Vancouver or Calgary, the trails are often busy and people keep to themselves. In less travelled areas most people are very welcoming and enjoy sharing stories of the trail.

Where were you hiking/camping?

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post #7 of (permalink) Old 07-16-2018, 01:24 AM Thread Starter
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When both men and women are hiking along the trail, it's usually the guy which says hello only.

I said the same to my wife and itīs the same with us. Seems to be common.


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Also, in more isolated areas where there are few hikers, people usually say hi but on popular trails where you come across people so often hiking in groups they are busy chatting away amongst themselves that they don't saying hi.

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Originally Posted by zeljkok View Post
Do you say "hi" to everyone walking on busy street in Munchen or Dortmund? This is what Berg Lake trail in summer is.

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Originally Posted by stro52 View Post
Kinda like how everyone is generally friendlier in a small town but in the big city people keep to themselves or group

OK, so obviously the reason for our impression was the extremely busy trail, not the country.


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Originally Posted by zeljkok View Post
Second factor is annoyance -- you go to nature to escape 'civilization' and instead have to fight human hordes -- such as intolerant kids at Kinney campground as you reported etc.

I mean, people probably know that Berg Lake is busy and easy, even for families. (But to be honest I was very impressed by the ladies who pushed their strollers up to Kinney lake.) Do you think that people on that trail are really annoyed?


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I've come across Germans hiking in Wells Gray Park quite frequently. I find they are no different.

Maybe not in behaviour but itīs easy to identify Germans: We usually wear Jeans on the trail and functional clothing anywhere else.


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and you were exactly where???

Kinney Lake and Whitehorn.
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post #8 of (permalink) Old 07-16-2018, 08:16 AM
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Maybe not in behaviour but itīs easy to identify Germans: We usually wear Jeans on the trail and functional clothing anywhere else.
Actually, I can only identify them when they start talking as I notice they have similar accents.
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post #9 of (permalink) Old 07-16-2018, 11:41 AM Thread Starter
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Where were you hiking/camping?

Sorry I forgot to mention that: It was Berg Lake Trail.
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post #10 of (permalink) Old 07-16-2018, 02:04 PM
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Actually, I can only identify them when they start talking as I notice they have similar accents.

Sometimes you can tell euro nations apart just based on their look, i.e. without hearing the accent. Berg Lake trail is good place to "practice"; for some reason it's extremely popular with Europeans just like Lake Louise area seems to be Asian favorite etc.
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post #11 of (permalink) Old 07-17-2018, 04:35 AM Thread Starter
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Sometimes you can tell euro nations apart just based on their look, i.e. without hearing the accent. Berg Lake trail is good place to "practice"; for some reason it's extremely popular with Europeans just like Lake Louise area seems to be Asian favorite etc.

Oh Yes But I think that there were Europeans only on the part from trailhead to Kinney Lake, didnīt see (or recognized) any sleeping there.
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