How heavy is your pack? - Page 2 - ClubTread Community

User Tag List

 8Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #16 of (permalink) Old 09-11-2017, 02:18 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 719
Default

n/a

Last edited by Eryne; 11-30-2017 at 05:52 PM.
Eryne is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #17 of (permalink) Old 09-11-2017, 02:40 PM
Summit Master
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Arguing with the Sun, YT, Canada.
Interest: Hiking, watercolour painting, chasing wildlife, backcountry cooking
Posts: 2,905
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eryne View Post
Jeepers, I feel like I hike with a behemoth pack. It's between 45 and 50 pounds for long trips (7-10 days) and I can't get it any lighter than about 40 pounds for shorter trips. My issue isn't that I lack ultralight gear, it's that if there's room in my pack, I feel obliged to fill it, just in case. It's a good thing I'm strong!
When my grandparents were still alive, they used to drive around BC with a camper on their pickup truck and set up in various favourite camp spots, and my grandma would brew her own beer in the camper. With the lighter materials available nowadays, I'm pretty sure you could adapt this to backpacking.
Eryne likes this.
mad owl woman is offline  
post #18 of (permalink) Old 09-11-2017, 02:45 PM
CEB
Scaling New Heights
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Lake Country, BC
Interest: Backpacking, hiking, Skiing, Mtn Biking, Windsurfing, Dirt Biking
Posts: 96
Default

@Eryne - I thought about getting a bigger pack because mine is tight when I have the Bear Canister in it and I don't like carrying things on the outside of my bag, but I realised that, as you said, the more space the more disciplined you have to be in order to not fill it up as well! I only weigh around 112lbs and I have a fake hip so I don't dare goany heavier and I'd be alotsmarter to keep trying to go lighter. Being fit definitely lets you push it but going lighter makes you enjoy it more (that's my hope anyway, as I go down in pack weight). It's tricky when you deal with flakey Weather Forecasts and big evelation changes/season shoulders.
CEB is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #19 of (permalink) Old 09-11-2017, 03:52 PM
Off the Beaten Path
 
kellymcdonald78's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Interest: Hiking, Backpacking, Skiing, Space History
Posts: 723
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CEB View Post
@Eryne - I thought about getting a bigger pack because mine is tight when I have the Bear Canister in it and I don't like carrying things on the outside of my bag, but I realised that, as you said, the more space the more disciplined you have to be in order to not fill it up as well! I only weigh around 112lbs and I have a fake hip so I don't dare goany heavier and I'd be alotsmarter to keep trying to go lighter. Being fit definitely lets you push it but going lighter makes you enjoy it more (that's my hope anyway, as I go down in pack weight). It's tricky when you deal with flakey Weather Forecasts and big evelation changes/season shoulders.

I've switched to the Ursack (https://www.ursack.com/) lighter than a Bear Canister and gets smaller as you use up your food
kellymcdonald78 is offline  
post #20 of (permalink) Old 09-11-2017, 03:56 PM
Off the Beaten Path
 
kellymcdonald78's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Interest: Hiking, Backpacking, Skiing, Space History
Posts: 723
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mad owl woman View Post
When my grandparents were still alive, they used to drive around BC with a camper on their pickup truck and set up in various favourite camp spots, and my grandma would brew her own beer in the camper. With the lighter materials available nowadays, I'm pretty sure you could adapt this to backpacking.

You're in luck, while it's not quite brewing your own, Pat's Backcountry Beverages ( https://www.patsbcb.com/) makes beer concentrate that you use with their portable carbonator. Their beer is pretty good and you can make root beer on the trail for the kids
kellymcdonald78 is offline  
post #21 of (permalink) Old 09-11-2017, 04:44 PM
Summit Master
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Arguing with the Sun, YT, Canada.
Interest: Hiking, watercolour painting, chasing wildlife, backcountry cooking
Posts: 2,905
Default

Hmm, that may be worth checking out.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kellymcdonald78 View Post
Their beer is pretty good and you can make root beer on the trail for the kids
I'm not sure how their parents would feel about that
mad owl woman is offline  
post #22 of (permalink) Old 09-14-2017, 06:03 PM
Hittin' the Trails
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 15
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Kinkaid View Post
Or if you hike in a thunderstorm.
err, trekking umbrellas are not conductive.

Quote:
Until you need both hands to make it up the trail.
well, like all gear.. some is better suited for certain trails than others. you could find a situation for most pieces of gear that they seem a poor choice in including all types of rain gear. ponchos? suck in forest and wind. non waterproof rain jackets? suck in warmer areas because nothing gets in or out. breathable rain jackets? suck after heavy downpour and wear out over time. umbrella? sucks in high wind (sometimes, pointing it against the wind is pretty effective) or if you need both hands for something else.

personally, i'm either umbrella or non breathable opting for the umbrella whenever possible. the breahtability is amazing, it's also great at blocking the sun, and i can honestly say i've never run into needing two hands for something else being an issue. but, ymmv.
mikeplowright is offline  
post #23 of (permalink) Old 09-14-2017, 11:06 PM
CEB
Scaling New Heights
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Lake Country, BC
Interest: Backpacking, hiking, Skiing, Mtn Biking, Windsurfing, Dirt Biking
Posts: 96
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kellymcdonald78 View Post
I've switched to the Ursack (https://www.ursack.com/) lighter than a Bear Canister and gets smaller as you use up your food
Yeah, I actually just starting looking at buying an Ursack. I was doing most of my backpacking in Yosemite last year and the Ursack wasn't approved for use there. I think that might be in progress right now though. Do you hang yours all the time or tie if off somewhere? It looks like you don't have to hang it but if you don't then you deal with rodents and if a Bear does gets it you get a bunch of crushed stuff. I do like the Bear Canister concept- stuff stays clean and dry in it, and I can keep it close to camp if allowed to and bypass putting food/my tootbrush/smelly stuff into the sometimes gross Bear Storage lockers. If it does get wet/dirty I wipe it off and it goes back into my pack. The weight definitely isn't great though.
CEB is offline  
post #24 of (permalink) Old 09-14-2017, 11:42 PM
Off the Beaten Path
 
kellymcdonald78's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Interest: Hiking, Backpacking, Skiing, Space History
Posts: 723
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CEB View Post
Yeah, I actually just starting looking at buying an Ursack. I was doing most of my backpacking in Yosemite last year and the Ursack wasn't approved for use there. I think that might be in progress right now though. Do you hang yours all the time or tie if off somewhere? It looks like you don't have to hang it but if you don't then you deal with rodents and if a Bear does gets it you get a bunch of crushed stuff. I do like the Bear Canister concept- stuff stays clean and dry in it, and I can keep it close to camp if allowed to and bypass putting food/my tootbrush/smelly stuff into the sometimes gross Bear Storage lockers. If it does get wet/dirty I wipe it off and it goes back into my pack. The weight definitely isn't great though.
I generally don't hang mine, however they do recommend securing it to a tree or rock 100 ft or so away from your tent (More to prevent an animal from carrying the bag away). I also use a scent proof bag to hold the food itself and keep things waterproof. So far I haven't had any issues with it . If you tie it properly, the bags are rodent proof. As for crushability, you can get an aluminum insert to protect the food, but I mostly use freeze dried food so there isn't much that can be crushed.
kellymcdonald78 is offline  
post #25 of (permalink) Old 09-21-2017, 11:16 AM
Hittin' the Trails
 
jensaito's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 8
Default

Right now base weight is about 22 pounds. My weight is about 112 lb.
jensaito is offline  
post #26 of (permalink) Old 09-21-2017, 06:44 PM
Hittin' the Trails
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 36
Default

I'm down to about a 12 lb baseweight (no food, fuel, water) after a bunch of years of replacing worn out gear with new lighter things and not taking things I haven't used been using. For a 7 day trip my total weight is about 30 lbs (including a couple of ounces of whiskey per night). I try to minimize the "just in case" items that I pack and keep it to the essentials. Its not the lightest out there, but I'm happy where I'm at.

I am comfortable in all three seasons, good weather and bad and have managed to avoid having to really blow money on anything expensive like dyneema (cuben). I eat good hot food and stay warm at night, even when it drops below zero. I use a tarp/bivy combo and can usually taylor my load to the weather forecast and type of terrain (above or below treeline). For example if the weather is looking great I'll leave the tarp and some clothing layers at home, if not so great the tarp comes, if really terrible I have a "beak" that I can bring along to get really good coverage and don't sleep above treeline and warm layers come along. I like that its flexible and can be adapted to different conditions.

My trips now are much more enjoyable than they were 4 or 5 years ago. I can cover more ground and see more country, I am less tired at the end of the day and I don't have to grunt as much going uphill!
sthorout is offline  
post #27 of (permalink) Old 12-10-2017, 10:37 PM
Hittin' the Trails
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 11
Default

30-35 lbs would be fine for a long day hiking trip. Some of my friends want to go ultralight, they shave off the tent and sleeping bag and just bring a sleeping pad. Then, they can't get a decent sleep at night. For me, a good sleep worths the pack weight.
Crash likes this.

If you want to find some gears like backpacking solar charger, 10 person tent... or get better preparations before any outdoor adventures, visit my blog to find out!
wildnfree is offline  
post #28 of (permalink) Old 12-11-2017, 11:23 AM
Headed for the Mountains
 
woodenshoes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Canmore, AB
Posts: 272
Default

depends if I carry climbing gear. IF I do then throw the standard weights out the window. IF not then for an 8day'er we did in Jasper I started out with 47lbs and happily decreasing daily from there. For a typical 3-4day trip it would be close to 35lbs.
woodenshoes is offline  
post #29 of (permalink) Old 12-11-2017, 12:51 PM
Summit Master
 
zeljkok's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Behind the Face Mask
Posts: 4,652
Default

I am nowhere close to expertise people like woodenshoes have, but am able now to go on 3 or 4 nights backpack with my 35L Bora. Just did 3 day trip down to Colorado River in Grand Canyon with it & felt almost as if I was day-hiking. This was unthinkable before. Big thing is this Nemo Hornet 1P tent which packs and weights like a feather. What still trips me is big camera and couple of beer cans, but hard to compromise on these 2.

Re ursack. I went to MEC last year to get one. Online inventory had 3 available in Calgary store. But they couldn't find it. That was the last drop for me as far as MEC goes; I'll never shop there again. But that's different story. Ended up buying standard bear canister @ Atmosphere, got it ridiculously cheap (under 50 CAD, sale). I like it because it helps keep my food organized. Downside: size and weight. Can't use it with 35L pack and must take big 65L.

On a curiosity, somewhat unrelated: In Canada we have bear hangs. So I get down to Hermit Creek campground in Grand Canyon, there's hang there too! WTF ?! Mice!
zeljkok is online now  
post #30 of (permalink) Old 12-11-2017, 03:09 PM
High on the Mountain Top
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Smurf Village, BC, Canada.
Interest: hiking, exploring, reading, random shiny things
Posts: 2,451
Default

Good grief I need to work on my pack weights...maybe that's why I don't like overnight backpacking!

Some of you are overnighting with my day pack weight!
guntis is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome
 

Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.1