Thoughts on best vessels for food drop - ClubTread Community

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post #1 of (permalink) Old 04-23-2016, 06:50 PM Thread Starter
adm
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Default Thoughts on best vessels for food drop

Not so much specific to hiking and backpacking, but didn't know else where to post.

Over the summer I will be doing a few longer traverses, in the past the most we have done is 10 days where we simply carry all food. However, this year some trips exceed 2 weeks and have wonderful opportunities at half way points to drive and hike food in.

So far our best idea is two 5gallon paint buckets with a clamp on the lid and hung very well. Another idea was to wrap the buckets in steel or aluminum and just leave them on the ground or slightly buried.

I know people have had success with larger boxes made of wood and metal, but we can fit the paint buckets in our packs, so they would be ideal to hike in, only problem then is we cannot burn them so would need to hike in later to retrieve them.

Any thoughts from the internet?

Cheers,

Anthony
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post #2 of (permalink) Old 04-23-2016, 07:08 PM
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you may want to look at Ursacks. http://www.ursack.com/

Light enough to pack out with you, no assembly required, cost might be an issue but they are reusable or perhaps resell when you are done. Available at MEC.
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post #3 of (permalink) Old 04-23-2016, 07:44 PM
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Don't bother burying. Any motivated bear will tear up anything you can do, unless you're pouring concrete.


Why not some larger dry bags that are well hung (heheh). Keep in mind you'll likely need to keep out nibbly critters as well, so maybe some steel clothesline might be in order.... Dry bags have more uses after your trip, or better resale potential.


http://theultimatehang.com/2013/03/h...he-pct-method/
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Last edited by Big Ian; 04-23-2016 at 07:52 PM. Reason: added link
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post #4 of (permalink) Old 04-24-2016, 01:54 AM Thread Starter
adm
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Originally Posted by alpalmer View Post
you may want to look at Ursacks. http://www.ursack.com/

Light enough to pack out with you, no assembly required, cost might be an issue but they are reusable or perhaps resell when you are done. Available at MEC.
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Originally Posted by Big Ian View Post
Don't bother burying. Any motivated bear will tear up anything you can do, unless you're pouring concrete.


Why not some larger dry bags that are well hung (heheh). Keep in mind you'll likely need to keep out nibbly critters as well, so maybe some steel clothesline might be in order.... Dry bags have more uses after your trip, or better resale potential.


http://theultimatehang.com/2013/03/h...he-pct-method/
Hmmm, thanks for the idea! Thought about the ursack, and it is a good solution, but it was basically a cost thing. Figured burying was useless...If hung its not so much bear I would worry about, but ravens and other birds getting through a dry bag or stuff sack.
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post #5 of (permalink) Old 04-24-2016, 08:35 PM
Dru
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20 gallon metal can is what is/was commonly used on the long glacier traverses. The type with a lid that crimps down. When you get to the airdrop and get to your can you can pound it flat with a rock, and either then carry the flattened can out or (I wouldn't recommend this but it has unfortunately been done in the past) chuck it down a crevasse where it won't pop out for 50 years or so, hopefully.

Getting an airdrop raided by bears can be a real issue. Clarke and Baldwin had to divert down the Machmell River because of that in the 80s.
Jan Palaty used to have a chunk of metal that had originally been a tuna can. A bear got to their airdrop in the Raccoon Pass area and chewed the whole can essentially flat.

I've seen a cache dug up by bears in the Tchaikazan., It popped all the propane cylinders but one. I think it liked the cold gas jetting out into its mouth.

When JC and JB did one of their big traverses near Terrace they came up with a coating for the cans that was (iirc) 1/3 flour, 1/3 cayenne pepper and 1/3 laundry soap. They mixed it together with water and then painted it on the cans. Apparently when they skiied up to one can there were wolverine tracks coming right up to it and then departing with twice the space between the tracks as on the approach
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post #6 of (permalink) Old 04-25-2016, 10:36 PM Thread Starter
adm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dru View Post
20 gallon metal can is what is/was commonly used on the long glacier traverses. The type with a lid that crimps down. When you get to the airdrop and get to your can you can pound it flat with a rock, and either then carry the flattened can out or (I wouldn't recommend this but it has unfortunately been done in the past) chuck it down a crevasse where it won't pop out for 50 years or so, hopefully.

Getting an airdrop raided by bears can be a real issue. Clarke and Baldwin had to divert down the Machmell River because of that in the 80s.
Jan Palaty used to have a chunk of metal that had originally been a tuna can. A bear got to their airdrop in the Raccoon Pass area and chewed the whole can essentially flat.

I've seen a cache dug up by bears in the Tchaikazan., It popped all the propane cylinders but one. I think it liked the cold gas jetting out into its mouth.

When JC and JB did one of their big traverses near Terrace they came up with a coating for the cans that was (iirc) 1/3 flour, 1/3 cayenne pepper and 1/3 laundry soap. They mixed it together with water and then painted it on the cans. Apparently when they skiied up to one can there were wolverine tracks coming right up to it and then departing with twice the space between the tracks as on the approach
Thanks for the thoughts and stories Dru

I had thought about coating something on the outside with some kind of pepper base, but I think it would be brutal to hike out with…

Anyway, lots to think for! Thanks for all the replies!
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post #7 of (permalink) Old 04-26-2016, 03:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adm View Post
Thanks for the thoughts and stories Dru

I had thought about coating something on the outside with some kind of pepper base, but I think it would be brutal to hike out with…

Anyway, lots to think for! Thanks for all the replies!
If you're hiking food into the drop sites (I think that's what your original post said) prior to your traverse(s), you could just leave them empty (once accessed) and hike in a second time to retrieve.
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post #8 of (permalink) Old 04-27-2016, 01:02 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by dlofting View Post
If you're hiking food into the drop sites (I think that's what your original post said) prior to your traverse(s), you could just leave them empty (once accessed) and hike in a second time to retrieve.
Thats what I meant by hiking out with them! But maybe the smell would have subsided in a few weeks time!

Had a friend offer me some Ursacks, so maybe that will be the simplest solution.

Cheers for the idea though!
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post #9 of (permalink) Old 04-27-2016, 11:57 AM
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Maybe what you need is a homing beacon, and then a drone can bring food to your actual location
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post #10 of (permalink) Old 04-27-2016, 07:41 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Dru View Post
Maybe what you need is a homing beacon, and then a drone can bring food to your actual location
Thats the future I think…new category of alpine climbing: DA (drone-aid)…just drone up your food every few days…completely eliminates need for haul bags
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