How do you stay dry hiking in rain? - Page 3 - ClubTread Community

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post #31 of (permalink) Old 01-07-2013, 08:35 PM
Headed for the Mountains
 
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by leimrod

In regards to alternate base layers, I see that the fishnet base layer is making a come back, particularly in UL circles.

http://www.livefortheoutdoors.com/Ge...-T-Shirt-2012/

Anyone had any experience with them? Seems like a sound idea, create pockets of warm air next to your skin and allow sweat vapor to move to your breathable layers.

As a bonus, they make you look like a boss also:

This site has been grac(h)ed with the fishnet or mesh shirt look before. Just wait, it'll get posted.
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post #32 of (permalink) Old 01-07-2013, 11:15 PM Thread Starter
Headed for the Mountains
 
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I did use an umbrella as a wind stop to a bivy shelter. This was a few years back when shoe shoeing along Round Mountain. Bivouacing along the crown exposed me to a steady cold wind. The umbrella shielded me, where my bivy sack shelter was immediately down-wind.

It certainly worked as a wind break.



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post #33 of (permalink) Old 01-07-2013, 11:29 PM Thread Starter
Headed for the Mountains
 
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sgRant:

Now those hat umbrellas are crazy! But that gives me an idea for supporting a regular umbrella: secure it with a strap around one's forehead. Perhaps just utilizing the velcro strap on the back of a regular ball cap.
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post #34 of (permalink) Old 01-08-2013, 01:38 AM
High on the Mountain Top
 
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don't wear a softshell and goretex. they are both outer layers. the softshell is probably hapering breathing a little bit. vs just a straight flece.

that being said. there is no asnwer. in goretex I sweat and still get wet even if jacket is 100% waterproof.
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post #35 of (permalink) Old 01-08-2013, 08:29 AM
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I found the best way I avoid or delay wet out on rain gear is to maintain the gear .

bought a front end loader washing machine and wash gear daily in summer or weekly in winter and always if sweat happened.Dry in drier to bring the DWR back to peak performance .

have yet to avoid wet out on shoulders from pack straps ,but this only causes dampness in shoulders that will dry out from body heat after finding shelter and adding layer to maintain warmth .

As for wetting from the inside out I plan my layers based on the speed i plan to go and if i'll be doing elevation or flats ,with a group or solo.I'll build my layers and test out on my balcony ,cool for flats and groups ,very cool to slightly cold for elevation .I'll bring a bandana to help regulate my head temp.

I find a soft shell is useless for anything but looking good ...but i'll bring my squamish hoody (only if i start out cloudy with chance of rain)and wear the only pants i own, the gamma LT ,which i'll unzip all zippers and roll up the legs to vent under the rain pants.

I let my hands get wet as i wear fleece gloves and have yet to try anything else.

For boots ,goretex for if i feel like hiking in hot damp feet or non gore that i find ok for a day hike with very damp feet.(i personally don't like gore boots and still wait for solomon to come out with a pair that has ankle support non gore).

As for trail running i go with no rain gear and a nano puff vest for some warmth if needed.

For all hikes and backpacking i expect to be damp the whole time ,its when i'm wet i start to get cold and uncomfortable ,then i'll bail and rethink my kit for next time.

Keeping the rain gear clean ;conditioning the DWR (drier heat);replacing older gear(newer DWR ,i found wash in DWR only brings back efficiency to about 80%) ;bring a tarp or umbrella for shelter to adjust layers,eat,make tea,purify water etc. ;Layer to help keep sweating to a mim.;and having a back up plan if things wrong is the net way i handle rain hikes.

Or move to a drier climate like Alberta where the hiking is just as good only different.
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post #36 of (permalink) Old 01-08-2013, 09:10 AM
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by smac

don't wear a softshell and goretex. they are both outer layers.
This. You're double-bagging yourself.

When moving you need very little to stay warm because your body generates heat. You can adjust your speed of movement to adjust your heat output. All you need is a base layer, and not too thick, under your shell.

When you stop, put a synthetic (not down) insulating layer on over (not under) your goretex.

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post #37 of (permalink) Old 01-08-2013, 09:16 AM Thread Starter
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forestwalker:

What I haven't been doing, but learned from you is:
- Use DWR washing regularly.
- Don't use soft-shell as insulating mid layer.
- Be diligent on regulating temperature by adjusting layers.

I have a couple of polar fleeces but rarely use them as mid layers (my mistake now). Instead I used and relied on my soft-shell for insulation (without realizing, as a mid layer, it was hindering ventilation).

Thanks for the advise.

... okay, I am off to do some laundry
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post #38 of (permalink) Old 01-08-2013, 11:52 PM
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I don't stay dry. I get way too hot very quickly moving uphill.

I use clothing that insulates when wet (ie not cotton), and I have a spare base layer (plus wool hat, additional layers, etc., of course) to change into once in camp. I guess that doesn't fit in with the ultralight philosophy but at least I'm warm and dry in camp. Helps if your wet clothes are quick drying too, but against my skin I don't want any hint of dampness against my skin once I've stopped for camping. I also carry the spare base layer for day trips in case of an emergency, but usually don't pull it out until I get to the car for a comfortable trip to the pub/home.
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post #39 of (permalink) Old 01-09-2013, 08:36 AM
High on the Mountain Top
 
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by forestwalker


I find a soft shell is useless for anything but looking good ...but i'll bring my squamish hoody (only if i start out cloudy with chance of rain)and wear the only pants i own, the gamma LT ,which i'll unzip all zippers and roll up the legs to vent under the rain pants.
You just haven't found the right soft shell. There are a lot of membrane laminates out there labelled as soft shell but which aren't in my books. They hardly breathe much better than GoreTex. I have an Arc'Teryx hard fleece which is what I think a soft shell should be: sheds snow and water quite well but breathes really well. As a result it's not that great in the wind. I pair that jacket with Patagonia Guide pants and the combo serves me for 90% of my winter activity. I carry hardshell pants and jacket to put on over top when it gets really windy and cold. This goes against the 'double bagging' advice above but works if you're cold.

Some people swear by the opposite extreme and go the vapour barrier route with a non-breatheable layer next to the skin. I've never taken the leap of faith to get equipped and try it.

I'm such a warm person that when actively moving in the rain, I pretty much hike in my base layer and get wet. When I stop I throw on water-proof breatheables and warm layers to keep warm during the rapid evaporative cooling. Often this is a big puffy belay jacket. If I'm camping, I change into something dry once the tent is up.
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