How do you stay dry hiking in rain? - Page 2 - ClubTread Community

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post #16 of (permalink) Old 01-07-2013, 10:39 AM
tu
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by skeleton
I bush-whacked up The Needles mountain...
No way to not wet out that I know if bushwhacking wet bush. Umbrella is best for the falling stuff, not the bush stuff.
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post #17 of (permalink) Old 01-07-2013, 10:41 AM
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I like an umbrella but don't like carrying things (lazy) so I strap it to my pack.

It's also nice when you stop you can put your pack underneath your umbrella and open it up while everything stays dry.
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post #18 of (permalink) Old 01-07-2013, 11:15 AM
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Quote:
quote:What is a pocket knife for ... I bring it but never need to use one.
One thing you can use the pocket knife for is to cut shavings to start a fire. Whether you're successful or not will depend on how dry you can keep the shavings.
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post #19 of (permalink) Old 01-07-2013, 11:40 AM
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by skeleton
- What is a pocket knife for ... I bring it but never need to use one.
You use it to cut off your own arm, after you fall into a hole and get your arm stuck under a big rock.
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post #20 of (permalink) Old 01-07-2013, 11:59 AM
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by skeleton

- What is a pocket knife for ... I bring it but never need to use one.
what is a seatbelt for ... I've traveled in cars for years but never need to use one []

I'm assuming you were joking, as you seem to know your stuff about having the right survival gear with you.

I've hiked with people before who, when asked about if they bring any of the 10 essentials have said "I don't plan on needing any of those", as if they are going to "plan" to end up in a survival situation.

As an aside, I bought the Baladeo 22g knife at MEC. DON'T BUY IT! It is a POS and there are more ways in which this knife would a hindrence in a survival situation than an aid.

For waterproofing, Gore-tex works to an extent but if the humidity gets high enough nothing is going to work if you are exerting yourself.

I like quick drying materials. I don't know how they do it, but my quick drying pants will go from soaking wet to bone dry in 30 minutes once I'm out of the rain



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post #21 of (permalink) Old 01-07-2013, 12:06 PM
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I love having an umbrella in the pack if there is a chance of rain. If you like to take photos, it's a great way to keep the camera lens dry.
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post #22 of (permalink) Old 01-07-2013, 12:12 PM
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you dont stay dry

if youre going strenuous enough, internal moisture will still get you, idf the external dampness doesnt ...

you plan your entire system on being functional when (not if) it gets damp

wear as little as possible when going to minimize sweat, and the layers that get damp

and make sure you can dry it out should you have the opportunity

its that simple
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post #23 of (permalink) Old 01-07-2013, 12:50 PM
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I plan on getting damp. There's just no way if I'm exerting and carrying a pack that I'm not going to get sweaty. You can only slow down so much or take off so many layers.


As Dean noted, using an umbrella can work very well. It means you can keep your Gore-Tex off and keep the rain off too. They have to be put away in some conditions, but I've used one successfully.

I don't take spare/extra clothes. What I do is plan on being able to dry the ones I have. When I stop, I get some insulation on right away. It's important that your insulation be very breathable. If it's still raining/snowing, I'll cover my insulation with a waterproof-breathable shell. As I am now inactive, my body heat begins to dry my layers. It's super important to not lock the wet in with non-breathable layers.
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post #24 of (permalink) Old 01-07-2013, 12:53 PM
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Nikwax polar proof really helps. Works on wool, fleece, polypro, etc. It still gets wet, but not nearly as much, and dries much faster. MEC has it.
http://www.nikwax.com/en-ca/products...?productid=597
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post #25 of (permalink) Old 01-07-2013, 02:02 PM Thread Starter
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Leimrod:

Yes I always carry a knife. But my "lighter side" comment has some truth to it. While a knife is considered an essential, I have experienced numerous times that it is lower on the list than: tarp, compass, head lamp, water bottle.

I usually prepare my bivy mattress by breaking (strong arm) evergreen bows instead of using a knife. It is faster and safer. But the knife is good for making shavings. I carry a Buck 183 Alpha Crosslock 2-Blade Folding Hunting Knife. The boning saw is great as a wood saw for cutting bows too wide to break. Again, my point being I have found more utility in a saw than a blade - for building emergency shelters.

http://www.midwayusa.com/product/690...h-nylon-sheath

In the following photos I collected wood, kindling and tinder - all without ever using my knife, although it was in my kit. The wood was scavenged from a tree that seemed to have split and fallen the previous season, perhaps from a lightning strike or strong wind. Fire was started with a plane ferrocerium striker on a cotton pad that I coat with petroleum jelly. (Oops - I did use the knife blade to strike the ferrocerium stick).



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post #26 of (permalink) Old 01-07-2013, 02:16 PM Thread Starter
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Bearbreeder:

I have used a trick when hiking on an over-nighter for which I want to trail run. I can't avoid the sweating, but I don't want my undershirt (base layer) from wetting my middle layer.

So, I have an old merino wool short-sleeve shirt; I have cut the two vertical sides entirely underneath the arm pits. This turns it into a full length "dickey" (faul turtle neck). When I come to a stop in the evening and wait ten minutes to stop sweating, I reach down my neck and pull up and off the sweat-soaked dickey. This works great in the winter when it is too cold to strip down to remove my undershirt. (I never use a tent when bivouacing in the winter - so I don't have adequate shelter from the cold wind.)



Johngenx:

I am realizing now by your comments and by others here, that I am over-dressed (insulated mid layer) when being mobile with exertion (trail running, bush whacking, or snow shoeing off trail).

I guess my problem has not really been about my outer layer wetting through - it is inevitable but more controllable than what I have been doing. My inner layer is also going to wet from sweating just cuz I like to move fast. My mistake is over insulating with the middle layer. I see now that this has caused me to: 1) over-heat and excessively sweat, and foremost 2) hinder the air circulation underneath to allow the sweat moistened air to ventilate out.


... I am always amazed, that despite years of practise and experience, there is still so much to learn from others. Thanks to all for you guidance.

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post #27 of (permalink) Old 01-07-2013, 03:40 PM
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by skeleton

While a knife is considered an essential, I have experienced numerous times that it is lower on the list than: tarp, compass, head lamp, water bottle.
You could say the same for any number of the items in my medikit. I've never had reason to use them but I carry them with me for when I might. The same with a knife, it has its uses in situations that you might never encounter in the backcountry.

Like the adage goes: "It's better to have and not need, then need and not have"

In regards to alternate base layers, I see that the fishnet base layer is making a come back, particularly in UL circles.

http://www.livefortheoutdoors.com/Ge...-T-Shirt-2012/

Anyone had any experience with them? Seems like a sound idea, create pockets of warm air next to your skin and allow sweat vapor to move to your breathable layers.

As a bonus, they make you look like a boss also:

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post #28 of (permalink) Old 01-07-2013, 04:43 PM
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My nipples hurt just by looking at him stand still!

My solution is a wool top, and bottoms.
Long or short sleeve thin shirt and long johns or boxers or briefs depending on the temps and amount of movement I make different combinations of those.

Goretex layer over top of it all with different vents opened or closed.


I have been up to -15 with this set up; zipped up, toque, hoodie and gloves and nice and toasty and dry inside.
I find it's any amount of wind that kills, in which case I add a wool hoodie underneath and start to zip up the vents.
I also have a wool wife-beater for a base base-layer which i sometimes use when I get scared and want to overdress

I opted for wool a while ago since I found it retains heat when wet. The synthetics seem to dry faster however they seem to take the heat away before they do.


short answer: base layer+goretex.




Quote:
quote:Originally posted by leimrod

Quote:
quote:Originally posted by skeleton

While a knife is considered an essential, I have experienced numerous times that it is lower on the list than: tarp, compass, head lamp, water bottle.
You could say the same for any number of the items in my medikit. I've never had reason to use them but I carry them with me for when I might. The same with a knife, it has its uses in situations that you might never encounter in the backcountry.

Like the adage goes: "It's better to have and not need, then need and not have"

In regards to alternate base layers, I see that the fishnet base layer is making a come back, particularly in UL circles.

http://www.livefortheoutdoors.com/Ge...-T-Shirt-2012/

Anyone had any experience with them? Seems like a sound idea, create pockets of warm air next to your skin and allow sweat vapor to move to your breathable layers.

As a bonus, they make you look like a boss also:

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post #29 of (permalink) Old 01-07-2013, 06:11 PM
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Another vote for an umbrella. Though it will interfere with the normal setup of those who walk with two poles. It is possible to attach them to your pack, but this usually isn't worth the hassle. There are caps with a small integrated umbrella I've seen the odd person using.

Another use for an umbrella is protection from the wind while stopped or sitting/moving around camp. Umbrellas are really nice to have for the WCT or Cape Scott.

In situations without wind, ponchos can keep you and your pack dry without the sauna effect.

http://www.incrediblethings.com/kids/ufo-cap-umbrealla/
http://www.aliexpress.com/store/prod...515169702.html
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post #30 of (permalink) Old 01-07-2013, 07:39 PM
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Rain means (more or less) 100% humidity, so even if you are are sitting in a shelter, the damp air will eventually dampen your clothes. So I don't think it is possible to have a day of exertion in the rain and not be damp to some degree regardless of what a person is wearing. The best a person can do is have a set of dry clothes for camp at the end of the day and to sleep in, and then start the next day again in damp clothes. Definitely not much fun in an extended cool rainy period, but that is my experience.

During times like this I just convince myself I am having fun because I am not hypothermic and I make sure I am staying warm. I have found that if I have been active outdoors for a few weeks and acclimatized, a revved up metabolism can overcome lots of cool damp weather.

All that being said good technical clothes that breathe and with some means of preventing oneself being soaked is important.
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