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post #16 of (permalink) Old 06-10-2011, 07:29 PM
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Google: sweet potato bark.

Be careful of too much sugar. Sure it will give you quick energy but the downside is the crash after high gylcemic foods spike in your system. Dried fruit/veg nuts, seeds, dried meats, hard cheeses, grains (whole rolled oats) are where you want the majority of your food energy to come from.
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post #17 of (permalink) Old 06-10-2011, 08:26 PM
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I've done multi-day trips without hot food, and I'll never do it again. Sure, it saved weight, time and energy, but not being able to make a hot drink or have any kind of hot meal really, really, sucked. With an ultralight canister stove, one can of fuel and some drink mix and dried soup mix, you can add little weight and have something hot. Totally worth it to me.

So, what did I eat on my cold food only trips? Wraps. Peanut butter/Nutella wraps for sometime during the day and tuna/cheese/mustard wraps for supper. The tuna packs are CHEAP at WalMart (the only reason I set foot in that stupid store) and you can even find packs with some pretty nice sauces, like lemon/pepper or curry. Add in some granola with powdered milk (okay cold), bars, BabyBel cheese (lasts a long time), pepperoni/sausage, maybe a bagel to be eaten early, and you're eating okay with all cold food.
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post #18 of (permalink) Old 06-10-2011, 10:34 PM
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by peter1955

Quote:
quote:Originally posted by Marc

I made Ceviche a couple of times for no stove camping
"""Ceviche (also spelled cebiche or seviche) is a seafood dish popular in the coastal regions of the Americas, especially Central and South America. The dish is typically made from fresh raw fish marinated in citrus juices such as lemon or lime and spiced with chili peppers. Additional seasonings such as onion, salt, and pepper may also be added. Ceviche is usually accompanied by side dishes that complement its flavors such as sweet potato, lettuce, corn, or avocado. As the dish is not cooked with heat, it must be prepared fresh to avoid the potential for food poisoning."""

Sounds a bit dangerous, although you could make it work if you could catch some fresh trout.

Actually it's not really dangerous. The citrus 'cooks' the fish. As long as you had reasonably fresh fish you could throw it in a baggie in the morning and have it for your first night. You could also make it with shellfish if you camp on the ocean in a suitable spot.
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post #19 of (permalink) Old 06-11-2011, 05:23 PM
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I once ate an ichi-ban packaged noodle thing uncooked, when the stove wouldn't work. Even when soaked a long time in cold water, it's still pretty crunchy.

Peter
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post #20 of (permalink) Old 06-11-2011, 06:09 PM
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Canned Ham... it's not light, but it will feed at least 4 people. Canned cocktail weinies are OK, too.
Canned Bacon is good, but you need to cook it. If you have a place nearby that makes sausages, they usually have a good assortment of dry sausages... Landjaeger, chorizo, Hungarian, Swiss, etc. I vacuum pack hunks of cheese separately, dry sausages, and bagels and then open what I need for a meal (the bagels get a bit flat when you vacuum pack them, but it saves space LOL). I have found the cheese to last 4 or 5 days like this.
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post #21 of (permalink) Old 06-13-2011, 10:10 AM
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I should mentioned cheese as well. It can keep for a week or so if you wrap it in cheese cloth dampened with vinegar.

Also, a pre-cooked beef roast then cryovac'd can keep 7 to 10 days (Brady's Meats in Abbotsford will do this for you). Mind you, it would be a shame to take this and not have mashed potatoes and gravy!

Cheers!
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post #22 of (permalink) Old 06-13-2011, 10:18 AM
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by Ryan Conroy

Quote:
quote:Originally posted by peter1955

Quote:
quote:Originally posted by Marc

I made Ceviche a couple of times for no stove camping
""" As the dish is not cooked with heat, it must be prepared fresh to avoid the potential for food poisoning."""

Sounds a bit dangerous, although you could make it work if you could catch some fresh trout.

Actually it's not really dangerous. The citrus 'cooks' the fish. As long as you had reasonably fresh fish you could throw it in a baggie in the morning and have it for your first night. You could also make it with shellfish if you camp on the ocean in a suitable spot.
The author of the article is the one who raises the spectre of food poisoning, not me. Any acid will pickle the fish, but I notice that even pickled herring is kept in the fridge once opened.
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post #23 of (permalink) Old 06-13-2011, 10:24 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by johngenx

I've done multi-day trips without hot food, and I'll never do it again. Sure, it saved weight, time and energy, but not being able to make a hot drink or have any kind of hot meal really, really, sucked.
Can I ask what time of year you did this?

I find when it is humid and hot out I have no interest in a hot meal or drink. I just want something like a salad and some juice.
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post #24 of (permalink) Old 06-13-2011, 11:42 AM
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Quote:
quote:
I find when it is humid and hot out I have no interest in a hot meal or drink. I just want something like a salad and some juice.
For some, a hot hearty soup really energizes the body & mind though I have to agree I typically want something cooler to eat and drink right after a workout.

Someone already mention Walmart to get the foil packages. Target also carries the Sunkist and Bumble Bee packages. Tuna, Salmon and Chicken. I was once pulled over at the border and I had to explain why I purchased $80 worth of these items.
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post #25 of (permalink) Old 06-13-2011, 01:27 PM
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I spend all my time in the Rockies, and even in the middle of summer, evenings and mornings tend to be chilly.
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post #26 of (permalink) Old 06-13-2011, 03:57 PM
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Carnation instant breakfast drinks are okay with cold water.

Sausage for 2-3 days and then dry beff jerky and baby bell or dried cheese after that.
Mini whole wheat bagels and then wraps or pita with peanut butter or canned meat/mustard.
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post #27 of (permalink) Old 06-13-2011, 04:29 PM
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Old fashioned dry cured sausage and hard cheeses (I like Parmesan) are good for weeks or months without refrigeration.
You know, the ones that are traditionally hung in a cool (not cold) place where air can circulate and the mice can't reach. It will last all year like that, which was its original intent. When wrapped in plastic, surface mold can happen after weeks, but won't hurt you and can be scraped off. Added bonus: When dry enough to preserve like that, you aren't carrying much heavy water around.
Dried flatbread like Ryvita (flatbread crumbs and chunks after day two, but still nutritious), trail mix, dried fruit, a variety of bars, nut butters, don't forget the chocolate. Granola and powdered milk. Some dried vegetables will reconstitute in cold water okay, some won't. Carrots seem to work well.
Famous Foods on Kingsway in Vancouver is a good place to start.
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post #28 of (permalink) Old 06-13-2011, 04:47 PM
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although crappy supermarket orange "cheddar" bricks will die of terminal sweat in a day or two unrefrigerated, more traditional cheeses, particularly the smoked ones, can last weeks with no refrigeration.
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post #29 of (permalink) Old 06-14-2011, 01:56 AM
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Brie Cheese in those little round containers are really nice as is that packaged pre-cooked bacon. Bacon and Brie bagels work really well
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post #30 of (permalink) Old 06-14-2011, 07:02 AM
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Bacon and Brie bagels! Add a tiny little twig and pinecone fire, all of ten minutes burn time to toast it up and we are talking luxury!
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