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post #1 of (permalink) Old 04-10-2002, 08:32 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
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Default What do you like.

I was wondering what kind of food do you like to eat out on the trail?
What would you bring for a multiple day trip?


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post #2 of (permalink) Old 04-10-2002, 09:20 PM
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Its funny you should mention that. Over the past few days I have been scouting around trying to find some good treats for backpacking trips. I've been thinking alot about the WCT and what I am going to eat that will keep me going, but also taste okay and keep me interested for an extended period of time.

Last weekend I bought a number of those expensive packaged meals from MEC. I know a few of you will probably give me a smack, but I figured I would try them out. We'll see if they are worth the expense.

Mr. Noodles is a pretty good thing to take. Or any type of instant noodles that prepares quickly. Avoid noodles that take too long to cook as it expends fuel. Doh!

Another item that I particularly like. Jimbo got me onto this.. Oceans makes these little snack packs with either Salmon or Tuna. It also comes with some crackers. They're quite tastey and reasonably light.





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post #3 of (permalink) Old 04-10-2002, 09:34 PM
Headed for the Mountains
 
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Hey Salut,

I like to bring light food when I go hiking. I've never been on an extended canoe trip, but guess I would bring heavier food if there was not much portaging.

Have you read the NOLS Wilderness "Something" Book, sorry can't remember the title, and I just packed the last of my books. NOLS has one book just about food, weight, recepies, and tricks. Its a great book. The NOLS Wilderness "Something" book is also awsome, and has a complete chapter plus several pages on what to bring, and how much you need. You can pick them both up at MEC. Does anyone know the title?

My food is never the same but often looks something like this:

Soup base 5 different kinds
Dried sauces, white, red, brown, etc
Dried Veggies, big bag
Pasta- veggie type, potatoe type, wheat type, and regulat white type
Dried Tortellinis with cheese in them
bagels
cheese
sun dried tomatoes
a small can of tuna or meat
powdered eggs
powdered milk
instant pancake mix
*****G*O*R*P****Good ol raisens and peanuts
instant coffee
dried and fresh fruit
banna bread
Ready Meal #1
Ready Meal #2
Snack bars

A la prochaine
Foxtrots




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post #4 of (permalink) Old 04-10-2002, 11:24 PM
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One tip I recently got from a friend who does week long kayak trips is make out each separate meal into its own pack. That will minimize the amount of digging and mixing you need to do at the campsite.

Foxtrots, was the book you were thinking of the "NOLS Cookery"? It's by Claudia Pearson (National Outdoor Leadership School).





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post #5 of (permalink) Old 04-11-2002, 07:43 AM
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
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I find that so of the most interesting and unique ideas come from my local health and natural food store. As I do like the taste of Mr.Noodle, I find that the MSG really makes me feel unpleasant the next day. Some of the best soups I've ever had were broth/flavour cubes that came from europe. They're unavailable here, but far superior that what we have here.

"In it for the Supermodels."
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post #6 of (permalink) Old 04-11-2002, 08:58 AM
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Get a food dehydrator and then you can dry up all your favorite sauces for pasta and rice on the fruit rollup trays. Homemade always tastes best. Cooked hamburger meat dehyrates and rehydrates really well....one of my favorites is rehydrated chili on 10 min. rice with pan fried bisquits.

Try Lipton noodle and rice dishes and augment them by adding mixed veg, onions, mushrooms, sundried tomotoes, some parmesan cheese, and rehydrated hamburger meat..

How about some flaked chicken and veg in a stovetop stuffing mix?

If your going to eat the premade stuff, Mountain House's Beef Stroganoff has always been one of my favorites and MSR's Chilimac is good too.

Baggles and peanut butter travel well as does those little mini pita's.

For breakfast there's always the standby oatmeal packages (*gack*) <img src=icon_smile_tongue.gif border=0 align=middle> or pan fries bisquits (easy to make). I like taking granola bars and those Flash 5 energy bars.



See you on the mountain!
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post #7 of (permalink) Old 04-11-2002, 09:50 AM Thread Starter
 
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Hiker Boy can you post the recipe for pan fried bisquits in the Recipes section. They sound great...<img src=icon_smile_tongue.gif border=0 align=middle>

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post #8 of (permalink) Old 04-11-2002, 02:50 PM
 
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Among my favourite things to bring on a trip to nibble on are BBQ chex and cheerios mix, belgian waffle or maple syrup wafers (truly delightful) and if you just need that taste of meat, some McSweeney pepperoni sticks!!!(to die for!!)

Its ok Marge we don't have to go on vacation. We'll just let the killer bees come to us.

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post #9 of (permalink) Old 04-11-2002, 03:00 PM
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Mmmmmm - I'm getting hungry just reading all these good ideas!
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post #10 of (permalink) Old 04-15-2002, 10:18 PM
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Just picked up a copy of the NOLS cookery this evening at MEC. Looks like some pretty good recipes. A few cooking tips too... <img src=icon_smile_tongue.gif border=0 align=middle>





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post #11 of (permalink) Old 04-15-2002, 10:45 PM
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I should mention - it goes for $15.





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post #12 of (permalink) Old 04-23-2002, 09:02 PM
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For my extended trips my meals usually look like this:
*note* each meal is separately baged and labeled breakfast 1, lunch 1 etc. for day 1, 2, 3, etc
Breakfast
2-3 instant porage
raisins and/or dried fruit
2 hotchocolate packages/coffee bags

lunch
Bagel with cream cheese
granola bar/cliff bar
dried fruit
(iced tea or water)

Dinner
Instant potatoes with cheese or dried veggies (extra butter!!)
bannana bread
coffee/tea/or hotchocolate

In between I'll snack on GORP, cliff bars and dried fruit or beef jerky. And mix up lunches and dinners with pasta dishes and instant rice dishes. They contain carbs and fats that your body can burn effectively to maintain energy and heat, (for those long cool spring nights)

I keep all my day 1, day 2, day 3 etc. meals packed in large freezer bags and in those the separate meals for the day. Not only does this keep everything highly organized but very water proof. Additionally, you can monitor closely, at a glance, your food intake and make adjustments to your intake or trip length etc. (also the extra bags keep food odors to a minimum when you are in bear county).

It works for me, and I've noticed some adventure racers use the same method as well.

Outdoorguy



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post #13 of (permalink) Old 04-23-2002, 09:33 PM Thread Starter
 
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Thanks folks for all your input


sbouchard
Keep it coming


Edited by - sbouchard on 04/29/2002 2:44:50 PM
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post #14 of (permalink) Old 04-30-2002, 09:01 AM
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I have found that instant mashed potatoes makes a great filler. We buy one that you only need to mix with water. I can't remember the brand name but it is called something like 4 cheese mashed potatoes.

It can make a quick lunch - just add boling wated and let it sit for 5 minutes - but mostly we split a bag to supplement our dinner.

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post #15 of (permalink) Old 05-21-2002, 06:50 PM
 
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Got kids? One multi day trip we accidentally found out that kids love bannock. Bannock is a basic biscuit mix fried in a small amount of oil. We smeared peanut butter and honey on the warm bannock and the kids ate it like candy.

We also like real fruits from dare. Real fruits are like gummy bears but they are made of real fruit juice and no complex sugars.

Something we found out that is amazing, (my 16 year old son and I call it hiker NOS) that will give you a great boost of energy to get over the last hump when you are out of steam. Chow down a Cliff or Power bar with a Gatorade chaser. We fill our 800 ml water bottles with H2O and add a scoop of powdered Gatorade, drink the 800 ml while resting and eating the energy bar, then fill the bottle a second time and sip while climbing. Try not to push the other hikers off the trail as you pass them <img src=icon_smile_big.gif border=0 align=middle> The great thing about this mix is that you don't have a sugar crash like you would if you drank a bottle of soda pop.

Evileye has hit the nail on the head, health food stores have great hiker fair. It may seem amazing but health food stores have an incredible amount of instant meals. Keep in mind that meat takes 3 days to digest, beans take 24 hours or less. So if you are hiking on Saturday you are using the meat that you ate on Thursday to power you down the trail. And if you are packing meat on Saturday while you are hiking, you are burning it Monday while you are sitting in front of the TV. I would rather pack what will help push me down the trail.

Barry


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