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post #16 of (permalink) Old 07-18-2006, 02:23 PM
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Q, as for packing out "poo" in the backcountry, while I know some people do it, I can't see it ever becoming a widespread practice. I've read "How to shit in the woods" and I agree with it in principle, but in practice.....Ewwwww. Even if you could convince me to do it, I bet for each person that did it there would be 100 others that wouldn't. I do, however, pack out or burn TP, or just use leaves instead (not giant hogweed!).
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post #17 of (permalink) Old 07-18-2006, 02:49 PM
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post #18 of (permalink) Old 07-18-2006, 03:58 PM
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With regards to brushing teeth (and flossing of course) - my dentist says flossing is the more important of the two as it better removes particles from between the teeth. Unfortunately it doesn't help much with the moss that tends to grow on your teeth if you don't brush. So floss (and carry out used floss or braid it into rescue ropes [8D])and brush with little or preferably no toothpaste.
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post #19 of (permalink) Old 07-19-2006, 02:34 AM
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Park your vehicle in a pullout or a true parking area. Think about the impact your vehicle makes just whipping it into any place you wish to. Down here, fires can be supposedly started by the heat from under your vehicles parking over shrubberies....not nice green ones...

Next time you are off the paved road, don't wave at a single person you see in approaching vehicles as a test and see how many actually wave at you first. Are you the only one who is waving? I like to rate places I visit with the "wave meter." Some places, like the Western Shore of Lake Meade are way high on the friendly "wave" meter. However, eastern Arizona Strip seemed to be the lowest.
I come upon a vehicle full of people and wave through the top of the steering wheel and they won't wave back at all! ouch!
How's your wave meter been, off road?

I've always been told that vehicles yield to atv's. ATV's yield to hikers. Hikers yield to horseback riders. Horseback riders yield to yaks....

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post #20 of (permalink) Old 07-19-2006, 09:03 AM
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by seawallrunner

when your group is walking down the mountain on a path, tired and dusty, and sees another party walking up the same narrow path - who stops to give the other group priority?

Folks walking down should step aside - the party going up is working on effort and momentum.

Courtesy allows a perk - the stopping party can stop on whichever side of the trail they may choose, including the mountain side of the trail if they want to.

And - remember to say thank you to the group that stopped for you.

Cheers - Miss Demeanour
On the other hand, people going up are usually only too glad to stop and rest (by stepping aside) while ppl going down may be charging down the trail at high speed with gravity on their side.

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post #21 of (permalink) Old 07-19-2006, 09:25 AM
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I usually step aside when encountering trail runners because it is a greater waste of energy for them to stop. I was on Diez Vistas a few weeks ago and one of my companions thought the trail runners that day were quite rude by just running straight by us and not even thanking us for making way. I generally yield to others coming up, especially if they have overnight packs, actually as a general rule I make way for anyone with an overnight pack when I have a day pack.
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post #22 of (permalink) Old 07-20-2006, 02:10 AM
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I like it when foreign people on the trail say HI ! and smile.
I know that for some of them it is probably the only English they know. I wonder what greetings I would use in other countries if I saw someone on the trail... They make the effort, so I would like to know what I would say to a person on a trail lets say....in CHINA if I approach them. How about RUSSIA? Does anyone know some foreign greetings? I know what to do in CALIPORNIA....."DUDE!!"
Howdy in some states... G'DAY in Australia? What are some others you know? Urban hiking greeing.... S'up? This is fun!

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post #23 of (permalink) Old 07-20-2006, 06:20 AM
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What a great idea, Q! There should be all sorts of etiquettes for us to read everywhere we go (be it in the backcountry or not!) cause some people really need reminders at times. I think sharing ideas and tricks is the way to go. There are never enough tricks to be learned. And like others, I bet there are things I still forget or don't know about.

I'll make sure to keep an eye on this topic from time to time as I love hearing about what others have to say.

And all I have to say for now is: people should say thank you more often! And smile too, cause smiles are free and contagious...
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post #24 of (permalink) Old 07-20-2006, 08:56 AM
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Some great ideas in this thread!

I often wonder why it is that people always say Hi on the trails, but can't even manage to move a few facial muscles for a smile on the street..

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post #25 of (permalink) Old 07-20-2006, 01:01 PM
 
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by deeks

I usually step aside when encountering trail runners because it is a greater waste of energy for them to stop. I was on Diez Vistas a few weeks ago and one of my companions thought the trail runners that day were quite rude by just running straight by us and not even thanking us for making way. I generally yield to others coming up, especially if they have overnight packs, actually as a general rule I make way for anyone with an overnight pack when I have a day pack.
The last time I heard the term "back country etiquette" was when some me and my group of friends were doing a winter hike to a hot springs past nakusp, and it was getting dark (9-ish). We were passing the leader of another, much larger group, and she freaked out at us, saying that it wasn't "back country etiquette" to pass people ahead of you. She was swearing away at us saying that she had done all the work of finding the route, blah, blah , blah. But the way I see it, she's slower, so we should be aloud to pass, and then WE can be the ones blazing the trail. We passed her shortly after anyway and arrived at the camp over an hour earlier that her group (partially because she thought she knew a better way and took a wrong turn). Is she the one misinformed about back country etiquette, or am I?

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post #26 of (permalink) Old 07-20-2006, 01:12 PM
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I'd say she was the one misinformed BC Trailblazer. I would think the etiquette in this situation would be for the slower group, to move out of the way so the faster group could pass.
Never heard that there is a "No passing" law in effect on the trail. I'd think the only time where you shouldn't pass is when the trail is so narrow it's hazardous to do so.
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post #27 of (permalink) Old 07-20-2006, 01:58 PM
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Quote:
quote:she freaked out at us, saying that it wasn't "back country etiquette" to pass people ahead of you.
Excuse me????? No, she was clearly way out of line. [V] I've always thought it was obvious back country etiquette to stand aside and let faster people pass. She had no right to try and enforce a speed limit for other users of the trail.

Maybe on popular trails we should implement a "keep right except to pass" rule
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post #28 of (permalink) Old 07-20-2006, 02:39 PM
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Im stretching here but maybe she thought you would widen the trail by passing the group. Regardless, even on narrow tracks through sensitive terrain its not too hard for two groups to pass each other
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post #29 of (permalink) Old 07-20-2006, 02:57 PM
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Yeah, that's an odd one Trailblazer. The only way I could see that she might have a case is if her and her team had been breaking trail in heavy snow for the majority of the trip, while you and your team intentionally hung back to let them do all the work. Then, as you got close to a cabin that had limited space, you and your team sped by to claim the choice spots in the cabin. To me, that would be pretty poor manners, but that's a real stretch.

PB
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post #30 of (permalink) Old 07-20-2006, 03:15 PM
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Don't snowshoe or posthole a skin track if you can help it, as doing so makes the trail much more difficult to ski. This rule doesn't apply if the skin track is the only broken trail that goes where you want to go. I'm not sure if postholing a snowshoe track is similarly bad form.

Also, when skiing / snowshoeing always offer to let a group behind you pass, since it can be impossible to pass someone while breaking a new trail.
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