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post #151 of (permalink) Old 08-21-2009, 12:33 PM
High on the Mountain Top
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: , , Canada.
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by gunthur

As a smoker I carry all my butts out while hiking. The ones I don't carry out get burned in a fire along with all other combustibles.

I have picked hundreds of butts off trails and it really pisses me off that people are that selfish.
Thanks to all the conscientious smokers, indeed, for picking up their butts as they go.

However, one thing I've noticed (perhaps because I'm a reformed smoker) is that the higher you go, the fewer butts you see. There will be lots at campgrounds, in parks and on pond loops, some few at lower elevations along trails with gentle slopes and easy access, but once you're past a few hundred metres in elevation gain, they seem to disappear altogether. This could mean that all the smokers who hike pick up after themselves, but there may be a simpler explanation.

I think smokers just can't make it up to heights requiring any extra exertion beyond that needed for a gentle stroll with Grandma. And all that fresh air probably confuses their lungs.
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post #152 of (permalink) Old 08-21-2009, 12:42 PM
High on the Mountain Top
 
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by SophieThomas

On the topic of trail etiquette, I would like to add that people should use existing fire pits. I have noticed over the years the rapidly growing amounts of fire pits on some of our local mountain tops, some of them even placed within the alpine flowers (most likely put there when the flowers were not) but still, take that into consideration! In some circumstances, a small stove is even a better alternative to a roaring fire :-)
Once you're in the alpine, there isn't enough fuel anyway for more than a smudge to warm your fingers up. Even in a campground, a stove is faster and easier to use than tending a fire in a firepit or stone ring (that's not a good idea, anyway, since stones can explode when they get hot), and when you turn it off, you know it's out and can't start a forest fire.

For all practical purposes, then, a stove is the only way to go. I would say, then that "In ALL circumstances, a small stove is ALWAYS a better alternative to a roaring fire". Yeah, yeah, a fire is nice and woodsy when the day is done, and the flames keep the boogeymen away, but for simplicity, completion of the task, and ease of use, the stove wins.
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post #153 of (permalink) Old 08-23-2009, 04:23 AM
Headed for the Mountains
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: canmore, alberta, Canada.
Interest: scrambles, climbing, water, fastpacking,
Posts: 130
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being the first at a trailhead parking and taking up most of the spots by not angle parking. oops
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post #154 of (permalink) Old 07-14-2010, 09:21 AM
Off the Beaten Path
 
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Location: Burnaby, BC, Canada.
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As far as a camp fire I like to have a small one especially if I am a little wet from a long day and the nights chill is creeping in. It is well to note though that higher alpine locations where there is not allot of fuel means no fire, Meadows with no stone or sandy ground means no fire. I prefer for safety sake to have a little fire right next to a stream or lake and to maintain it at a small size. It always comes down to weather and location and surplus of deadwood in the end.

Keep our back country clean and green!
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post #155 of (permalink) Old 09-01-2011, 11:49 AM
Scaling New Heights
 
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Location: Burnaby, BC, Canada.
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Will non-native food that is put on the ground affect the ecosystem around it? For example, compare a camas flower from BC to a banana peel from Ecuador. Also, they put a lot of pesticides on your fruit, so don't put that on the ground either, unless it's organic.
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post #156 of (permalink) Old 07-16-2014, 11:31 PM
Headed for the Mountains
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Vancouver Island, BC, Canada.
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What is the standard ettiquette about ownerless backpacks?

4 days ago I was hiking a little used trail when I came across an overnight backpack sitting beside the trail. I gave a holler, nobody answered. Snapped a few shots of the pack for curiosity's sake, and kept going, as I was 2+ hours from more travelled trails, over 5 hours from my car with only 2.5 hours of daylight left.

Yesterday I got a call from the RCMP looking for information about a missing hiker. Turns out the pack was hers, she'd signed a peak log book less than an hour's hike from her pack 2 days before me. If I'd called in the pack the night I found it, Search and Rescue would have had a starting point right away when she was reported missing the next day, instead of spending another 24 hours searching before other hikers reported the pack.

When I saw it, I figured someone was answering nature's call or looking for a campsite, maybe going somewhere for a nice photo. Respect for others' property generally means don't touch, but the backcountry might be a bit different?

At what point would you check a backpack for ID, or call it in right away?

Edit: new topic started
https://www.clubtread.com/sforum/topi...TOPIC_ID=63103
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post #157 of (permalink) Old 07-16-2014, 11:45 PM
Summit Master
 
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Join Date: May 2002
Location: Victoria, BC
Interest: Love the outdoors. Hiking, backpacking, geocaching, camping, canoeing, and kayaking. Did I say camp
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by Lythe

What is the standard ettiquette about ownerless backpacks?

4 days ago I was hiking a little used trail when I came across an overnight backpack sitting beside the trail. I gave a holler, nobody answered. Snapped a few shots of the pack for curiosity's sake, and kept going, as I was 2+ hours from more travelled trails, over 5 hours from my car with only 2.5 hours of daylight left.

Yesterday I got a call from the RCMP looking for information about a missing hiker. Turns out the pack was hers, she'd signed a peak log book less than an hour's hike from her pack 2 days before me. If I'd called in the pack the night I found it, Search and Rescue would have had a starting point right away when she was reported missing the next day, instead of spending another 24 hours searching before other hikers reported the pack.

When I saw it, I figured someone was answering nature's call or looking for a campsite, maybe going somewhere for a nice photo. Respect for others' property generally means don't touch, but the backcountry might be a bit different?

At what point would you check a backpack for ID, or call it in right away?
Can I immediately suggest we peel this away into a separate topic? The discussion that results around this could be seriously useful and enlightening.
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post #158 of (permalink) Old 07-17-2014, 01:52 PM
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Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Van., BC, Canada.
Interest: Bass, bike, hike
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Control your dogs please.

No, I don't care if "it's okay, he's friendly" get your dog's nose out of my crotch.

And no, it's not cute to go chasing and digging up marmot holes or running loose and barking up deer trails.
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post #159 of (permalink) Old 09-15-2017, 08:19 AM
Hittin' the Trails
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michel View Post
Control your dogs please.
Absolutely agree. Even if a leash is not required in a particular area, dog owners should keep their pets leashed, unless they are perfectly socialized and always obey commands.
Even so, you can't be sure how your dog would act in a specific case, even if it's usually calm and quiet.
I'm a dog owner myself.
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